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Sunday, May 18, 2003

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Soaps on small screen

THIS refers to the article "All's unfair on the small screen" by Renu Rangela (April 27). There is no denying the fact that in most soaps on TV women are either depicted in the Sati-Savitri mould, tolerating all sorts of maltreatment or at the other extreme of having affairs at the drop of a hat. Mostly, it is the women who are depicted as vamps out to destroy a happily married and peaceful household. The irony of the situation is that the viewership of these never-ending serials is mostly made up of women.

The show business people, be it in films or TV, have only one aim and that is to rake in maximum return by projecting women in such objectionable modes and roles. It is women's organisations and other NGOs which need to start a movement on the issue so as to put pressure on government to check this unhealthy trend.

H.S. Sandhu, Panchkula

Discard materialism

Apropos of Taru Bahl's "Gravitating towards serenity" (April 27), in the present-day materialistic world man seems to be left with only one concern and motto in life i.e. economic security and progress at any cost. And in this mad race for materialistic prosperity, one has left everything social, cultural and human concerns far behind with the result that he now stands alone with a haunting sense of emptiness staring him in the face.

 


Our youth, who are so enthusiastic about monetary gains and jumps, need to learn and inculcate in their personality a love and respect for cultural traditions and values. The progress of a nation lies not just in its factories and agricultural fields, but also in the outlook towards life of the people who run and manage them.

Ved Guliani, Hisar

Cultural heritage

I admired the article "When cultural property is a casualty of war" by B.N. Goswamy (May 4). It is a pity that war-mongers with their narrow vision, selfish approach and bloated egos have little time for the protection and preservation of cultural treasures of great civilisations, which during hostilities stand plundered or are reduced to ashes.

One can only hope that people all over the globe will join hands to salvage whatever little is left of the carnage at Baghdad. The United Nations can hopefully play a historical role by coordinating such activities.

Prem Singh Bajaj, Ludhiana

Shiv Kumar Batalvi

This is with reference to "Lesser-known facts about a well-known poet" by Jitender Puri (May 4). Although Shiv Kumar Batalvi was a matriculate, but he joined Government Ripudaman College, Nabha, to pursue graduation in 1963 and remained there for two years. I, along with thousands of students of those days at Nabha, miss and cherish his sweet nature and melodious rendering of his poems.

Rajinder Kumar, Vashishta, Kaithal

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