Tuesday, July 15, 2003, Chandigarh, India





National Capital Region--Delhi

THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
W O R L D

Pak intrudes into Afghan territory
Kabul, July 14
An Afghan Government team has confirmed that Pakistani forces intruded into eastern Afghanistan where soldiers from both sides have clashed in recent weeks, an Afghan official said today.

US soldier killed, six hurt in Iraq
Baghdad, July 14
Attackers fired rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns at US soldiers in Baghdad today, killing one and wounding six, the U S military said. The attack came the day after the launch of an Iraqi Governing Council of local leaders, which the USA hopes will reduce resentment towards its occupation.

US troops inspect a machine gun found during a search after a convoy of military vehicles was attacked in the central al-Mansour area of Baghdad on Monday. — Reuters photo
US troops inspect a machine gun found during a search

Iraq had ‘preplanned’ guerrilla warfare
New York, July 14
A secret document, issued by Iraqi secret police two months before the US military action began, shows that ongoing guerrilla warfare was always the Iraqi plan, a media report says.

Britons feel misled over Iraq war: poll
London, July 14
Two-thirds of British voters think Prime Minister Tony Blair misled Britain over the case for war in Iraq, according to a survey in today’s Daily Mirror newspaper. Sixty-six per cent of those questioned by ICM Research said they believed the Prime Minister had misled them — either knowingly or unknowingly — before he sent troops into action.

Blast in Indonesian Parliament
Jakarta, July 14
A bomb shattered glass panels at Indonesia’s national Parliament today, just days after the arrest of Jemaah Islamiyah terror suspects, who were said to be planning attacks.
A police dog walks with its handlers after examining the site of the explosion at the Indonesian parliament A police dog walks with its handlers after examining the site of the explosion at the Indonesian parliament on Monday.
— Reuters photo



Benny Carter
Legendary alto saxophone player, jazz composer and big band leader Benny Carter died on Saturday at the Cedars Sinai hospital in Los Angeles, a spokeswoman for the medical center said on Sunday. He was 95. Carter, who was credited with breaking Hollywood's colour bar by composing and arranging music for films including such classics as "Stormy Weather," died after a brief illness, according to a statement on his Web site. — Reuters


EARLIER STORIES
 
Curiosity and a quest for neighbour-
hood peace takes Indian students to Pakistan.
(28k, 56k)

Nepal calls Maoists for talks
Kathmandu, July 14
The Nepalese Government has invited Maoist rebels to resume peace talks at the earliest with a view to solving the seven-year-old insurgency problem through dialogue and maintaining peace in the Himalayan kingdom.

Pravasi Divas to focus on younger NRIs, PIOs
New York, July 14
The Pravasi Bharatiya Divas 2004 will focus on second and third generations of non-resident Indians  and People of Indian Origin, with representation from 110 countries. The first Pravasi Bharatiya Divas was held in New Delhi on January 9-11 this year.

Unseen stars of animated film
Los Angeles, July 14
For their children or for friendship, Hollywood stars are lending their famous voices to characters in animated features. The faces of Catherine Zeta-Jones, Michelle Pfeiffer and Brad Pitt adorned advertisements for Dreamworks studios’s “Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas,” unreeled in US theatres on July 2.

Pak MPs to visit India
Fazal-ur-Rehman
Islamabad, July 14
In the midst of peace moves, a four-member parliamentary delegation of Pakistan’s pro-Islamist Mutahida-e-Majlis-e-Amal is going on a four-day visit to India for interaction with India’s political parties’ leaders.

Fazal-ur-Rehman, speaks during an interview with Reuters in Islamabad on Monday. — Reuters photo

Pak Foreign Office for recognition  to Israel
Islamabad, July 14
Concerned over the growing Indo-Israeli relations, especially in the field of defence, the Pakistan Foreign Office in a major policy shift has recommended the government to recognise the Jewish state and establish diplomatic relations to reap military and economic benefits from Tel Aviv.

Revellers are chased by a bull calf at the San Fermin festival in Pamplona Lord Swraj Paul and his wife with Cherie Blair

Revellers are chased by a bull calf at the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, Spain, on Monday. A pack of six fighting bulls and steers runs through the centre of the town to the bullring every morning during the week-long festival, made popular by US writer Ernest Hemingway.
— Reuters

Lord Swraj Paul and his wife (extreme left) with Cherie Blair, wife of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, during a function to remember their daughter Ambika Paul, who passed away 35 years ago, at the London zoo on Sunday evening. — PTI

Top








 

Pak intrudes into Afghan territory

Kabul, July 14
An Afghan Government team has confirmed that Pakistani forces intruded into eastern Afghanistan where soldiers from both sides have clashed in recent weeks, an Afghan official said today.

A spokesman for President Hamid Karzai said a tripartite commission of Afghan, Pakistani and US security officials are expected to tackle the border problem in talks tomorrow.

“There have been encroachments,” presidential spokesman Javid Loodin told a news conference, referring to a report compiled by the team that recently returned from the border.

Pakistan has repeatedly denied that any of its forces have crossed into Afghan territory.

Afghanistan and Pakistan have long had disagreements over their porous border but the recent intermittent clashes have seriously strained their relations.

Protests against Pakistan have erupted in several parts of Afghanistan, including Kabul, where a mob attacked the Pakistani Embassy, smashing windows and office equipment and damaging vehicles last week.

Mr Loodin said Pakistani forces were found to have encroached in the Goshte and Lalpur districts to the east of the city of Jalalabad. In one place they were about 600 metres inside Afghan territory, he said.

The latest border troubles have coincided with an operation by US-led forces on the Afghan side of the border, and by Pakistani troops on their side, to block the movement of fighters loyal to the ousted Taliban and their Al-Qaida allies.

Many Afghans regard Pakistan with suspicion, partly because of Pakistani support for the Taliban for years, until the September 11, 2001, attacks on the USA. — Reuters

Top

 

US soldier killed, six hurt in Iraq
Andrew Gray

Baghdad, July 14
Attackers fired rocket-propelled grenades and machine guns at US soldiers in Baghdad today, killing one and wounding six, the U S military said.

The attack came the day after the launch of an Iraqi Governing Council of local leaders, which the USA hopes will reduce resentment towards its occupation.

US forces have been attacked frequently in postwar Iraq. Officers are braced for a surge this week to coincide with several anniversaries linked to ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and his Baath Party.

A convoy of military vehicles was attacked in the central al-Mansour area of Baghdad around 6 am (local time) a military spokesman said. Casualties were taken to a military hospital.

Witnesses said one vehicle was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade and another by machinegun fire.

Dozens of US troops searched the area as helicopters hovered above. Soldiers searching an abandoned house in the area found a light machinegun probably used in the attack.

Thirtytwo US soldiers had been killed in Iraq since President George W. Bush declared major combat over on May 1.

Iraqis cooperating with the occupiers who toppled Saddam on April 9, had also been killed and wounded in attacks.

Yesterday, a bomb killed one Iraqi near a police station and a local policeman was killed when his patrol was fired on as it tried to help US forces attacked at a checkpoint.

A group calling itself the “Armed Islamic Movement for Al Qaeda, the Falluja Branch” said in an audio tape broadcast by Dubai-based Al Arabiya television yesterday that it was behind attacks on US forces in Iraq and warned of more bloodshed. — Reuters
Top

 

Iraq had ‘preplanned’ guerrilla warfare

New York, July 14
A secret document, issued by Iraqi secret police two months before the US military action began, shows that ongoing guerrilla warfare was always the Iraqi plan, a media report says.

In its upcoming issue, Newsweek reports that the document listed 11 steps if the Iraqi leadership falls to “the American-British-Zionist coalition forces.” The first step, it says, was looting and burning of all government institutions that belong to “our Directorates”.

The other steps, it says, included sabotaging power plants, assassinating Imams, buying stolen weapons from citizens and generally creating mayhem.

The document has not been officially verified, but a senior Pentagon official called it “plausible”, and the magazine says in any case the orders have been largely, if not entirely, carried out.

During the last week of June, just in Baghdad, Iraqis launched attacks on US soldiers an average of 20 times a day, Newsweek says quoting confidential military report.

“All you do is try to help them and they just throw rocks at you and spit at you and shout at you,” Sgt. Paul Harris, who is stationed outside Baghdad, tells Newsweek.

“Good works now seem like a waste of time in the searing desert heat.” Alpha Company brought in bulldozers to clean the trash off a neighbourhood soccer field. The next day people used it as a dump again. “There’s no trust anymore,” says Sergeant Harris.

The magazine says L Paul Bremer III, the American civil administrator who heads the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA), may have inadvertently recruited guerrillas for Mr Saddam Hussein by disbanding the Iraqi army and the Baath Party, and leaving thousands of men with no visible means of support.

Mr Bremer reversed himself and put the soldiers back on a small salary, yet Iraq still swarms with men who are armed and trained to kill and blow things up.

“Many Baathists did not support Saddam and would have been happy to work with the Americans, but when Mr Bremer made his decision that Baathists have no place in the future of Iraq, they were desperate,” says Mustafa, an Iraqi professional who works for the CPA and welcomes the American occupation, though not the way it is being carried out.

US intelligence officials, the magazine says, acknowledged for the first time last week that resistance seemed as if it was coordinated at the regional, if not the national, level. — PTI
Top

 

Britons feel misled over Iraq war: poll

London, July 14
Two-thirds of British voters think Prime Minister Tony Blair misled Britain over the case for war in Iraq, according to a survey in today’s Daily Mirror newspaper.

Sixty-six per cent of those questioned by ICM Research said they believed the Prime Minister had misled them — either knowingly or unknowingly — before he sent troops into action.

The poll is a further blow to Blair as he struggles to convince voters that Britain was justified in going to war.

Yesterday, former chief of UN weapons inspectors Hans Blix became the latest expert to question the evidence put forward by the British Government in making its case for war.

The Mirror poll found that 27 per cent of Britons believed Blair had knowingly given them false information, while 39 per cent thought he had misled the people without knowing.

The survey also found that one in three Britons, or 35 per cent, had lost confidence in Blair because of the war, with 11 per cent of Blair’s own Labour Party saying they had lost faith.

But the poll was not all bad news for the Prime Minister, as 66 per cent of those questioned believed Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction at the beginning of the war.

ICM Research interviewed 1,012 adults between July 10 and 12. — Reuters
Top

 

Blast in Indonesian Parliament

Jakarta, July 14
A bomb shattered glass panels at Indonesia’s national Parliament today, just days after the arrest of Jemaah Islamiyah terror suspects, who were said to be planning attacks.

Jakarta city police chief Makbul Padmanegara said he could not yet say what type of bomb was used in the blast, which caused no injuries. “I need time to carry out further laboratory research,” he told reporters.

He said the motive and the culprits were not yet clear.

Central Jakarta police chief Sukrawardi said today’s bomb was similar to one which exploded on April 24 behind the United Nations headquarters in the city centre and which also caused no injuries.

“This bomb was assembled with black packing tape, precisely the same as the one on Wahid Hasyim Street. But there’s no definite conclusion yet. A different assumption could emerge later,” Sukrawardi said.

He said today’s bomb at Parliament, which was in recess, almost certainly had a timer. — AFP
Top

 

Nepal calls Maoists for talks

Kathmandu, July 14
The Nepalese Government has invited Maoist rebels to resume peace talks at the earliest with a view to solving the seven-year-old insurgency problem through dialogue and maintaining peace in the Himalayan kingdom.

In a letter sent to the talks convener Baburam Bhattarai, Information Minister Kamal Thapa called upon the rebels to fix a date for formally starting the third round of talks and resolving all differences peacefully, a media report said.

Mr Thapa urged the Maoists to resume the stalled talks process at the earliest with a view to resolving the insurgency problem through dialogue and maintaining sustainable peace and stability in the country, according to the government-run The Rising Nepal.

The Maoists had taken the government’s letter positively and would come up with a fixed date for the third round of talks in a day or two, said human rights activist K.S. Malla, who is also a member of the government-Maoist talks monitoring committee.

Meanwhile, the Nepalese Government had agreed to release all Maoist detainees, including the three central level leaders, gradually to facilitate the peace process, Mr Malla said.

The government and the Maoists had during Friday’s informal talks agreed to avoid any armed confrontation and settle matters of dispute through mutual consultations, he said.

The five agitating parties had also asked the Maoists to come up with an agenda. They had offered to discuss the three-point agenda of the Maoists, including the constituent assembly elections, if they accepted the 18-point agenda of the parties. The agenda included provisions to curtail the powers of the monarchy. — PTI
Top

 

Pravasi Divas to focus on younger NRIs, PIOs

New York, July 14
The Pravasi Bharatiya Divas 2004 will focus on second and third generations of non-resident Indians (NRIs) and People of Indian Origin (PIOs), with representation from 110 countries.

The first Pravasi Bharatiya Divas was held in New Delhi on January 9-11 this year. About 2,000 delegates from 62 countries, including 700 from the USA and Britain, took part in the conference.

The 2004 event will also begin on January 9 to mark the return of Mahatma Gandhi to India in 1915 after a two-decade stay in South Africa. The conference will have three new features, besides the programmes held earlier this year.

“The three-day second Pravasi Divas will have a special plenary session aimed at second-and third-generation of overseas Indians, an exhibition of ethnic (Indian) news media and a global business network,’’ Mr Vivek Bharati, adviser to the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI), which is co-sponsoring the conference with the Ministry of External Affairs, said.

At a dinner meeting, hosted here over the weekend by Mr Amarendra Khatua of the Office of the Ambassador-at-large for NRIs and PIOs, Mr Bharati said, “The main aim is to focus on the younger Indians, many of whom have never visited the land of their ancestors.

“Some young Indians have expressed interest to volunteer their services.’’

Mr Bharati, one of the officials sent abroad to drum up support for the Pravasi Divas and “sell’’ the event among PIOs and NRIs in the USA, ended his 10-day America visit in New York. — UNI
Top

 

Unseen stars of animated film

Los Angeles, July 14
For their children or for friendship, Hollywood stars are lending their famous voices to characters in animated features.

The faces of Catherine Zeta-Jones, Michelle Pfeiffer and Brad Pitt adorned advertisements for Dreamworks studios’s “Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas,” unreeled in US theatres on July 2.

Unfortunately, in the movie itself, their beautiful faces can’t be seen.

But that doesn’t matter to animation expert Jim Hill.

“What really matters is that before the release, the stars are everywhere — interviews, magazines, televisions, sign ads — and this makes you (want) to see the film,” he said.

Since 1998, when the unique voice of Woody Allen joined that of actress Sharon Stone in the film “Antz,” Dreamworks has used the actors’ fame as publicity.

“Just like Steven Spielberg wants the best for his movies, we want the best talent in the world, too,” Dreamworks cofounder Jeffrey Katzenberg told USA Today. — AFP
Top

 

Pak MPs to visit India

Islamabad, July 14
In the midst of peace moves, a four-member parliamentary delegation of Pakistan’s pro-Islamist Mutahida-e-Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) is going on a four-day visit to India for interaction with India’s political parties’ leaders. The delegation, led by Maulana Fazlur Rahman, Secretary-General of the Jamat Ulama Islami (Fazlur), will drive to India by road through the Wagah checkpost near Amritsar.

Party spokesman Hafeez Hussain Ahmad, who will be a part of the delegation, told reporters that they had been invited by the leader of the Jamat Ulema Hind, Asad Madani. The Pakistani lawmakers would visit Sirhind in Punjab, New Delhi and Deoband in Uttar Pradesh, the birth place of the Deoband Sunni Islamic sect, considered to have inspired several militant outfits like the Taliban. — PTI
Top

 

Pak Foreign Office for recognition to Israel

Islamabad, July 14
Concerned over the growing Indo-Israeli relations, especially in the field of defence, the Pakistan Foreign Office in a major policy shift has recommended the government to recognise the Jewish state and establish diplomatic relations to reap military and economic benefits from Tel Aviv.

The Pakistan Foreign Office has strongly supported covert, if not overt, diplomatic ties with Israel claiming that the shift would bring about a bonanza of political, military, and economic benefits for Pakistan, media reports said here today.

The advantages and disadvantages of this significant decision, which an official described as a “cost and benefit analysis”, had been spelt out in a confidential summary prepared by the Mideast section of the Foreign Office last month on instructions from “some high office”, local daily ‘The Nation’ reported.

The recommendation stating that Pakistan would not suffer any disadvantage if it recognised Israel, was handed over to President Pervez Musharraf before he embarked on his visit to the USA.

“We don’t see any harm in recognising Israel,” it quoted an unnamed Foreign Office official as saying. — PTI
Top

 

Pak tribesmen ban women teachers

Peshawar, July 14
Tribal elders in northwest Pakistan have banned aid organisations from sending women to teach girls in their homes and have threatened to burn down the house of anyone harbouring the woman teachers, a tribal elder said today. “We have banned the entry of only those women, who were violating our traditions by visiting houses in the garb of teachers,” said Maulvi Mohammed Amin. — AP
Top

 

Fifth Indian held in kidnapping case

Singapore, July 14
The last of the five Indian nationals accused of kidnapping an 18-year-old youth has been rounded up by the Singapore police, officials said today.

Sivakumar Muthu, 29, was charged during the weekend with abducting Vigneshvaran Selvaraj, who was kept in a metal container for three days and nights. — DPA
Top

 
BRIEFLY

FISH ‘RESPOND’ TO SOFT PORN
FRIBOURG (SWITZERLAND):
Fish can be aroused by an aquatic equivalent of pornography, according to researchers at a Swiss university. They have discovered that male sticklebacks ejaculate more sperm if first stimulated by a ‘soft porn’ film showing flirting fish. It is thought that the image sparks a competitive instinct in the spectating sticklebacks to ensure that they stand the highest chance of fertilising their female’s eggs. — DPA

WOMAN SETS NEW BIKINI WAX RECORD
SYDNEY:
An Australian woman has ripped her way into the record books by giving bikini waxes to 130 persons in four hours without any apparent mishap. Lareesa Guttery, a beauty therapist in Perth, claimed her new record on Saturday when she almost doubled British woman Deanne Ware’s two-year-old mark of 77 waxes. — Reuters

3-YEAR-OLD TAKES CAR FOR SPIN
BERLIN:
A three-year-old German boy took the keys of his father’s car, started it and plowed through two tents before coming to a halt, the police said on Monday. — Reuters
Top

Home | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Editorial |
|
Business | Sport | World | Mailbag | Chandigarh Tribune | Ludhiana Tribune
50 years of Independence | Tercentenary Celebrations |
|
123 Years of Trust | Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |