SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI



THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
O P I N I O N S

Editorials | On this day...100 years ago | Article | Middle  

Oped Review

EDITORIALS

Gavaskar checks in
Can he do the Herculean job?

F
inally
, after some very strong remarks by the Supreme Court, N Srinivasan, the controversial president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), is willing to relinquish his position. Sunil Gavaskar, one of India's greatest cricketers, will head the BCCI in respect of the administration of the IPL. Another former cricketer, Shivlal Yadav, who is a BCCI vice-president, will carry out the other duties of the BCCI president. It is heartening that the Supreme Court is taking such a deep interest in the affairs of the BCCI.

Acting by abstaining
India takes a pragmatic stand on Sri Lanka
India
has abstained from voting in the United Nations Human Rights Council on a resolution against Sri Lanka. The resolution, passed by the UNHRC, was propelled by the US and other western nations and it asked for an international investigation into possible war crimes in 2009. Both the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tiger rebels have been widely accused of committing atrocities and widespread human rights violations.



EARLIER STORIES

Populist as usual
March 28, 2014
The battle for Varanasi
March 27, 2014
BCCI clean-up
March 26, 2014
India's TB scare
March 25, 2014
Stalwarts sally forth
March 24, 2014
Wrong to tell Russia what it canít do
March 23, 2014
Strongman Modi
March 22, 2014
Terror taint
March 21, 2014
No longer a secret
March 20, 2014
Infighting in BJP
March 19, 2014
Targeting television
March 17, 2014



On this day...100 years ago


lahore, Sunday, march 29, 1914
Literature in the Punjab
T
HERE was a slight decrease in the number of publications issued in 1912-13, the total having fallen by 33 to 1532. But this is ascribed to the exclusion of a number of leaflets which cannot properly be classed at literature. The number of original works was 1079, the rest being translations or republications. The linguistic classification shows that 38.5 per cent of the publications were in Urdu, 34 per cent in Punjabi, 7.3 per cent is English, 0.8 per cent in two languages. 

 
ARTICLE

Consensus on talks with Taliban
Political parties in Pakistan, however, protect their own turf
D. Suba Chandran

E
ver
since the current round of negotiations with the Taliban in Pakistan began, there have been numerous committees, limited military strikes and continuing violence by militants. A cursory look at the problematique reveals two major fault lines. The first is between the multiple actors who are directly and indirectly party to the negotiations and its outcome ó political parties, the military, the Taliban and civil society. Second, there is also a fault line within each of the above actors on the endgame.



MIDDLE

Enhancing rhythm with weak forms
Sharda Kaushik

"... every accent, every emphasis, every modulation of voice, was so perfectly well turned and well placed, that, without being interested in the subject, one could not help being pleased with the discourse..." óBenjamin Franklin

The rhythm of the language, in harmony with its distinct melody, adds to the listener's delight and augments communicative worth of connected speech. In English, stressed and unstressed words are interspersed at regular intervals, and their recurrence gives the language its characteristic stress-timed rhythm. 



OPED

Where has the fun gone...
Nonika Singh

y
eh
na dekh sakta hai na sun sakta haiÖ sarkar hai kya. Funny? We guess. Alas! The film, in which rib-tickling one-liners either miss the point or fail to pack a punch, isnít. The so-called punch lines actually are by and large singularly not funny and positively un-amusing. But for a stray dialogue here and there, the humour is the filmís biggest casualty.

Directionless pursuit
Johnson Thomas

t
his
is Shilpa Shetty and Raj Kundraís first home production and as such, much was expected from it. However, this one could have well been left alone.

Not on fertile political ground
Johnson Thomas
taking
advantage of the election season to fashion a story about young love juxtaposed against tragic circumstances, national responsibility and conservative old-school mindset, Syed Ahmed Afzal makes an attempt to garner box-office eyeballs and is at least a trifle refreshing.

Of saviour and salvation
Ervell E.Menezes

s
o
, itís back to Biblical times. And who doesnít remember the deluge and the birds and animals aboard the Ark to increase and multiply after the destruction of earth and the receding flood waters. The man anointed for the task is Noah.







Top








 

Gavaskar checks in
Can he do the Herculean job?

Finally, after some very strong remarks by the Supreme Court, N Srinivasan, the controversial president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), is willing to relinquish his position. Sunil Gavaskar, one of India's greatest cricketers, will head the BCCI in respect of the administration of the IPL. Another former cricketer, Shivlal Yadav, who is a BCCI vice-president, will carry out the other duties of the BCCI president. It is heartening that the Supreme Court is taking such a deep interest in the affairs of the BCCI. It has emerged as a beacon of hope because the BCCI officials have allowed the sport to fall into a state of disrepute, especially the scandal-hit IPL. It's clear that a massive clean-up exercise is required.

Will Gavaskar be able to do the job in his temporary role at the BCCI? It is difficult to be too hopeful because several powerful business and political interests are deeply entrenched in the BCCI structure. They will resist change and eviction. The BCCI is a super-rich organisation which has become a den of corruption; but, as a few former cricketers noted on Friday, the latest measures are akin to treating cancer with band aid. Even Gavaskar, who was a controversial if an undoubtedly great player, has been part of the self-serving BCCI system. Critics have called him the mouthpiece of the BCCI because of his constant defence of the cricket administrators. It would be interesting to know the reasoning behind the Supreme Court opting for Gavaskar as an agent of change and clean-up. Why not, say, Kapil Dev?

The Supreme Court has noted that Srinivasan -- as the BCCI president and IPL team owner ó is in a position of a serious conflict of interest. To allow Srinivasan to buy IPL team Chennai Super Kings (CSK), the BCCI's rules had been changed retrospectively, much after he had actually bought CSK. Sadly, this situation could have been averted by the Supreme Court. In a separate case, a split Supreme Court verdict allowed Srinivasan to become BCCI president. The subsequent IPL scandal, and the involvement of Srinivasan's son-in-law in it, underlined why conflict of interest is a perilous and undesirable situation.

Top

 

Acting by abstaining
India takes a pragmatic stand on Sri Lanka

India has abstained from voting in the United Nations Human Rights Council on a resolution against Sri Lanka. The resolution, passed by the UNHRC, was propelled by the US and other western nations and it asked for an international investigation into possible war crimes in 2009. Both the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tiger rebels have been widely accused of committing atrocities and widespread human rights violations.

Earlier, India had supported other resolutions that censured Colombo. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had even abstained from attending the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting Summit held in Colombo last year. However, this time, India was uncomfortable with a resolution that asked for an international inquiry. India considers such an inquiry intrusive, and that it would set a wrong precedent. Predictably, South Block is facing considerable flak from Tamil political leaders like M. Karunanidhi, and even Finance Minister P Chidambaram.

India faces a delicate task. Human rights got a short shrift during the 26-year civil war, more so in the final stages. Various revelations of extra-judicial killings and torture that have hit the headlines have continued to build pressure for a proper inquiry into the conduct of both sides, something that Colombo has stoutly resisted. Sri Lankan Tamils continue to be discriminated against and there has been little development in the Tamil-dominated northern Sri Lanka. However, an intrusive inquiry into the events may not help the situation. India now must put pressure on Colombo to speed up the process of reconciliation, accountability and political resolution. Tamil Sri Lankans need to be brought into the mainstream of the Sri Lankan story. Human rights violations need to be investigated and those guilty must be punished. India has a major role to play in Sri Lanka and its foreign policy must reflect its concerns and strengths, as it has in this case.


Top

 

Thought for the Day

If you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people. óVirginia Woolf

Top

 
On this day...100 years ago



lahore, Sunday, march 29, 1914
Literature in the Punjab

THERE was a slight decrease in the number of publications issued in 1912-13, the total having fallen by 33 to 1532. But this is ascribed to the exclusion of a number of leaflets which cannot properly be classed at literature. The number of original works was 1079, the rest being translations or republications. The linguistic classification shows that 38.5 per cent of the publications were in Urdu, 34 per cent in Punjabi, 7.3 per cent is English, 0.8 per cent in two languages. About one-quarter of the Punjabi books are also more Urdu than Punjabi ďbeing written by Mahomedans in Persian script and containing a large proportion of Persian and Arabic words.Ē Whether Punjabi Mahomedans have begun to disregard their mother tongue or whether the works have been produced by the few enthusiasts of the Pan-Islamic School is not stated, but the tendency itself is significant.

Mr. Pearsonís impressions

THE Rev. Mr. W. Pearson, who accompanied the Rev. Mr. Andrews to South Africa, has written a brief letter to the press embodying a few impressions of his visit. He says that in his evidence before the Commission he strongly criticised the system of indentured labour and now gives his reasons for that criticism. He writes: ďAfter a careful study of the laws relating to this aspect of the Indian question and of their actual working, I feel bound to come to the conclusion that they do not afford adequate protection to the workers. For this, however, the blame must rest chiefly on the Government of IndiaÖ I believe that, if the Europeans of this country realised the possible abuses of the indenture system as I have seen them during a close and persistent study of nearly two months, they would agree that a system of free labour in which the good master gets and keeps the willing service of his workers would be more in accordance with British ideals.Ē

Top

 

Consensus on talks with Taliban
Political parties in Pakistan, however, protect their own turf
D. Suba Chandran

Ever since the current round of negotiations with the Taliban in Pakistan began, there have been numerous committees, limited military strikes and continuing violence by militants. A cursory look at the problematique reveals two major fault lines. The first is between the multiple actors who are directly and indirectly party to the negotiations and its outcome ó political parties, the military, the Taliban and civil society. Second, there is also a fault line within each of the above actors on the endgame.
Maulana Sami-ul-Haq, a negotiator for the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), addresses the media after a meeting of the negotiation committee in Islamabad on March 22, 2014.
Maulana Sami-ul-Haq, a negotiator for the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), addresses the media after a meeting of the negotiation committee in Islamabad on March 22, 2014. AFP

There have been numerous ďall-party conferencesĒ and debates within and outside Parliament. Though there seems to be a consensus in negotiating with the Taliban in Pakistan, there are subtle differences within the political parties in terms of the endgame. The ruling PML-N and the Punjabi leadership seems to be primarily interested in ensuring that violence does not spread into Punjab. It appears they prefer to live with an element of Taliban presence and influence in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), provided they do not attempt to infiltrate into Islamabad and the rest of Punjab.

The regional political parties, especially in KP, including the Awami National Party and Imran Khan's PTI, also seem to be pursuing a same goal, but to a limited extent. It appears that the political parties in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa are also willing to live with a Taliban presence and influence in FATA, and selected settled regions in KP such as Swat, as long as the TTP and its ideology gets quarantined within these tribal belts.

The MQM and the PPP also seem to be more interested in protecting Sindh, especially the port city and economic capital of Pakistan, Karachi. Today, there are more Pashtuns living in Karachi than in Peshawar, Kabul and Kandhahar. The Taliban has an influence over the Pashtuns in Karachi, which undermines the MQM, the ANP and the PPP. Since the PML-N has a smaller political constituency in Sindh, the Punjabi leadership may not be averse to an element of Taliban presence in Karachi as long as it does not affect economic growth and the economic corridor to Lahore and Islamabad.

Given the nature and size, the Baloch parties have less or no say in what they want vis-ŗ-vis the Taliban, though the latter's presence in Balochistan has increased sectarian violence and undermined Baloch nationalism. For the rest of Pakistan, perhaps the undermining of Baloch nationalism under the heat of a violent sectarian discourse suits their larger, but narrow interests.

If these factors drive the negotiating positions of the political parties at the national and regional levels, it appears each one of them is trying to protect its own territory and allow the Taliban to function to a limited extent outside its sphere of influence.

If the political parties have an agenda to protect their own turf, religious leaders of different parties such as JI, JUI-F and JUI-S along with self-styled maulanas and mullahs are trying to increase their political clout. Supporting the Taliban, its ideology and the need to negotiate with the militants gives them an edge, as could be seen in the composition of committees.

After becoming politically less relevant if not totally irrelevant, the maulanas and mullahs see the Taliban as an opportunity to rekindle the entire Islamic and Islamisation debate within Pakistan. For them the Taliban and the negotiation agenda open a debate which would bring them into the mainstream debate on the future of Pakistan. The Taliban offensive opens a political door for the clergy and religious parties.

What is the endgame of the military in talking to the Taliban? Though most of the TTP's demands such as the release of prisoners and stopping military actions are directly related to the military, the GHQ and the ISI seem to have succeeded in allowing the political leadership take the primary heat and blame. A section within the GHQ and the ISI still seems to believe in a role for the Pakistani Taliban in any future negotiations with Afghanistan. While a section of the TTP may be fighting the Pakistani military, a section in FATA and across the Durand Line still works for the military such as the Haqqani network and its supporters in FATA along with a few ďpro-StateĒ militants.

The military's thinking perhaps is: once the Americans leave Afghanistan, a substantial section of the Afghan Taliban and its supporters within Pakistan would move west of the Durand Line. So if the GHQ and the ISI could sit tight during this year, calibrate its military responses to the TTP's intrusions and ensure that the political leadership takes the blame for any inaction, there would be a different security environment post 2014.

What is the endgame of Pakistani Taliban and its franchisees? Even if the political and military leadership in Pakistan is willing to give FATA and select settled districts of KP in a platter to the Taliban, Mullah Fazlullah is unlikely to be contended with this. What the State is willing to give the TTP is what it already controls. It is unlikely that the Pakistani Taliban would be contended to have its influence only in FATA.

Going by what Fazlullah wanted in the Swat valley and knowing the State's weakness, the Taliban leadership should be well aware of the importance of 2014. Instead or along with accepting its own sphere of influence in the tribal belt, the TTP leadership would use the negotiations as a strategy, build its own empire, create confusion within the political leadership and ingress into the rest of Pakistan. Also in the process, it would allow its franchisees in Quetta, South Punjab and Karachi to expand their presence.

Perhaps, the TTP is also waiting for the 2014 deadline following which the Afghan Taliban have an opportunity in Kabul, and the Pakistani Taliban their own ďstrategic depthĒ across the Durand Line.

Finally, the endgame of civil society. Though the liberal civil society is opposed to negotiations with the Taliban, its voice is small and weak, perhaps limited to English newspapers and TV channels. The larger debate is being shaped by the mullahs, maulanas and their supporters along with a few political leaders such as Imran Khan (referred as Taliban Khan now). If the moderate civil society has to impose its own endgame in terms of completely negating the Taliban and its influence, it would need the support of the political leadership and the military.

It is unfortunate that the only section that does not want to provide any space for the Taliban in Pakistan is also the weakest. And there lies the strength of the Taliban and its franchisees.

The writer is the Director, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies (IPCS), New Delhi

Top

 

Enhancing rhythm with weak forms
Sharda Kaushik

"... every accent, every emphasis, every modulation of voice, was so perfectly well turned and well placed, that, without being interested in the subject, one could not help being pleased with the discourse..." óBenjamin Franklin

The rhythm of the language, in harmony with its distinct melody, adds to the listener's delight and augments communicative worth of connected speech. In English, stressed and unstressed words are interspersed at regular intervals, and their recurrence gives the language its characteristic stress-timed rhythm. The intelligibility of many non-native speakers gets affected since they don't pay due attention to the aspects taken up below:

1. The 'man has 'had his 'meal at 'home.

Marked with a stroke, "man, had, meal" and "home" indicate sentence stress placed on them, realized as emphasis; heard loud and clear. On the other hand, "the, has, his" and "at" are unstressed, spoken quickly; almost glided over. Helping verbs, articles, prepositions, conjunctions and most personal pronouns have two or more pronunciations, a strong form and one or more weak forms. Weak forms are the shortened spoken versions of those words. In its weak forms, "has" is heard as /hez/, /ez/ or /z/. The schwa symbol /e/ stands for a weak vowel sound, heard like the second vowel sound of "focus". The unstressed "his" is heard as /iz/ and "at" as /et/.

2. 'Arms and the 'man is the 'name of a 'play.
Here, each stressed word is followed by two unstressed words, resulting in a different rhythmic pattern. The article "the" in both the positions has the vowel // since "the" is unstressed and appears each time before a consonant: "the man" and "the play". But if "the" occurs before a vowel, as in "the alien", it will be heard as /i/ as in "sip". The other unstressed words "and, is, of" and "a" are spoken as /en/, /iz/, /ev/ and /e/.

3. 'Write and 'send it as 'soon as you 'can.
Since nouns, main verbs, adjectives and adverbs are generally stressed, "write, send" and "soon" receive the stress. The word "can" is also stressed as it is the last word in the sentence behaving like a main verb. The conjunction "and" is heard as /en/ with the /d/ dropped and the conjunction "as" as /ez/, both following their weak forms.

4. 'Bebo? 'No. I 'said, 'Bebo 'and 'Saif; 'the 'Saif.

The rhythmic pattern is somewhat unusual here because almost all the words are stressed. The words "and" and "the" receive special stress here to indicate that it is not Bebo alone, and that Bebo is accompanied by the well known Saif. Following their strong forms, "a" in "and" is articulated as "a" as in "lap" and the vowel in "the" is pronounced as "ee" as in "reed", the sound represented with the symbol /i:/.

Since many Indian languages like Hindi have a syllable-timed rhythm where not much time distinction is made between stressed and unstressed words and syllables, learners find it difficult to acquire the rhythm or beat of English. Reference to rules of rhythmic patterns and their practice help enhance international intelligibility.


Top

 
OPED REVIEW


Role model

Bollywood actor Varun Dhawan said he is deeply inspired by megastar Amitabh Bachchan, whom he considers his idol. "For me the most important thing is that the audience enjoys my film.Ē

Going strong

Celebrating three years of its existence, the food lifestyle channel is now focusing on strengthening its reach in International markets. It launched its Rogers Cable Network in Canada.

Good luck

Bollywood actor Shatrughan Sinha will be given the International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) award for his outstanding contribution to cinema. The IIFA awards ceremony will be held at Tampa Bay.

Where has the fun gone...
Nonika Singh

yeh na dekh sakta hai na sun sakta haiÖ sarkar hai kya. Funny? We guess. Alas! The film, in which rib-tickling one-liners either miss the point or fail to pack a punch, isnít. The so-called punch lines actually are by and large singularly not funny and positively un-amusing. But for a stray dialogue here and there, the humour is the filmís biggest casualty.

missing the punchline: Bilal Amrohi and Pulkit Samrat
missing the punchline: Bilal Amrohi and Pulkit Samrat

No wonder the much hyped situational comedy dealing with tainted politicians, corrupt media and a whole lot of bad men and women turns out to be a mirthless affair. Sure, the movie has its heart in its right place but the rest of the organs are completely out of sync if not out of order. So what you get is a mishmash where neither comedy works nor its noble message. Never mind that it comes straight to the point with the murder of a CBI officer probing into a Commonwealth Game type of scam. By the way, you neednít rack your brains as to whodunnit. The mystery is revealed quite soon. For, who else can be the killer but the wily politician the officer was investigating? Only the officer it seems has been murdered twice over, shot dead by the arch enemy of the politician to frame his rival. But before the dead man can be laid to rest, the now found now lost dead body begins to play a crucial role.

And here we digress. Remember a gem called Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro that has gone down in the annals of cinematic history as a cult classic and entertained you all the way. O Teri is somewhat fashioned on similar lines in which two simpletons (Pulkit Samrat and Bilal Amrohi) bump into a laash and consequently uncover the sinister plot. But thatís where the similarity ends. If in the Kundan Shah film even the dead body acted and emoted with its poker face expression here even gifted actors like Anupam Kher are given a short shrift. Comparatively, Vijay Raaz (as Kherís bÍte noire) with a sexual predilection, is better lampooned and the song picturised on him is groovy too. But little else about the film is. Actually ten minutes into the film you are served the Bollywood song and dance routine with songs like Your butt is going round on the platter. All this naach gaana does isóit brings the lead Pulkit Samratís dancing skills to the fore. No more, no less. Sure, Pulkit is earnest moreso in the final act. Actually the anticlimax packs a few stirring moments but by then itís a classic case of too little too late. The biggest redeeming feature of the film its short length of less than two hours too doesnít save it from falling into the drab and dreary abyss.

Watch it only if your funny bone is tickled without provocation. Our adviceógrab a DVD of the good old Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro. As for Sallu Bhai fans, hereís the real dampener. He makes his presence felt only in the end in a song when credits roll. Needless to add by then his charismatic presence can do little to lift the film or cinegoersí spirits. The only uplifting element of the film of course is the sartorial choice of two lovely women. Mandira Bedi playing media management consultant attired in deep back cut blouses and exquisite sarees looks fetching. The wardrobe of Sarah Jane Dias as Monsoon, a TV channel head, is noteworthy too. Their performances, however, are hardly worth a note.

Amidst the din of dead body and scandalous CDs changing hands we are struck by an afterthought. Why didnít Salmanís dear sister Alvira, who along with hubby Atul Agnihotri, has produced the film cast the superstar bro in the film? It would have saved them a whole lot of money and audiences (critics too) would have known in advance what to expect. To be honest typical Salman Khan potboilers would any day be a better option.

Top

 

Directionless pursuit
Johnson Thomas

this is Shilpa Shetty and Raj Kundraís first home production and as such, much was expected from it. However, this one could have well been left alone.

This is basically a film about a guy who wants to join the underworld and become a gangster. Set in the backdrop of Mumbaiís ghettos, this film tells the story about an upper middle class manís descent into crime. Itís an all seen-before scenarios that just donít engage, enthrall or entertain.

Viki (Harman Baweja), a motherless boy clamouring for love, doesnít get it from his busy father who supposedly is a Gandhian. All the luxuries of his life can do little to stem the discontent in his soul. So, he starts selling drugs and uses Mota Tony (Prashant Narayanan) to wreak revenge on those who bullied him in school. He enters the world of crime and thatís where he meets Lakwa (Sunny Deol spewing haryanvi). Viki shores up his gangsta credibility by spreading rumours about his heroics but never manages to live up to it. We really donít know what the writer or director wanted to convey. Incoherence plagues you at every turn thereafter!

Thereís no clear exploration of Vikiís discontent or why he is attracted to the dark side. The screenplay doesnít have much depth. The pace is lethargic and extremely debilitating. Sunny Deolís presence does liven up things for a bit, but thatís certainly not enough to set things right here.

Top

 

Not on fertile political ground
Johnson Thomas

Jackky Bhagnani and Farooq Shaikh
Soft Impact: Jackky Bhagnani and Farooq Shaikh

taking advantage of the election season to fashion a story about young love juxtaposed against tragic circumstances, national responsibility and conservative old-school mindset, Syed Ahmed Afzal makes an attempt to garner box-office eyeballs and is at least a trifle refreshing.

Abhimanyu (Jackky Bhagnani) and his live-in girlfriend Anvita (Neha Sharma) are enjoying life in Tokyo when he is forced to get back to the country of his birth following his father (Boman Irani), the Prime Minister's, death. Once back in the home country, the path to love becomes further complicated by the rigours of political life and conservative expectations.

The premise was intriguing but the exposition, set-up and eventual progression to the climax too shifty to be riveting. The dialogues lack wit and polish while the screenplay is also lacking. The political drama and love story is not crafted with much finesse either.


Top

 

Of saviour and salvation
Ervell E.Menezes

so, itís back to Biblical times. And who doesnít remember the deluge and the birds and animals aboard the Ark to increase and multiply after the destruction of earth and the receding flood waters. The man anointed for the task is Noah.

Russell Crowe
Russell Crowe

Based on the Book of the Genesis, director Darren Aronofsky takes some liberties with the text but brings out the spirit and substance of that era which began with the beginning, when there was nothing.

Slowly, colour appeared, then nature and then lifeóbirds and creatures and lastly humans. Adam and Eve and the serpent, the apple, sin and being driven out of Paradise is all old hat. Much, much later came Noah (Russell Crowe) and his family, his wife Naameh (Jennifer Connelly) and sons Ham (Logan Lerman), Shem (Douglas Booth) and Japheth (Leo McHugh Carrell). They come across an orphan child Ila (Emma Watson) who later marries Shem but life is anything but smooth.

Noah is very demanding and in his interpretation of Godís wishes rubs folks wrongly. First, it is Ham who breaks away from the family due to differences with Noah. Meanwhile, Methuselah (Anthony Hopkins) plays the guiding senior who lives in the mountains and keeps searching for berries.

The visuals are fetchingly shot by Matthew Libalique and an apt screenplay, not unduly verbose, imbues Noah with an old-world charm. Then excellent performances by Russell Crowe and Jennifer Connelly further embellish the narrative. Anthony Hopkins is his usual self and though the 132-minute work could easily have been clipped of 20 minutes, still it is wholesome entertainment. It may not be in the same league like Quo Vadis and Ben-Hur but it is still worth watching.

Top

 

TV movies

Saturday March 29
9:00AM Zee Cinema
Taarzan: The Wonder Car is a romantic thriller film directed by Abbas Burmawalla and Mustan Burmawalla. The film stars Vatsal Seth, Ajay Devgn and Ayesha Takia in the lead roles. The film is inspired by the 1983 horror, Christine.

ZEE CINEMA
11:27AM Shiva Shakti
5:40PM Anari
9:00PM Taarzan: The Wonder Car
MOVIES NOW
10:00AM Fantastic Four
12:10PM Shutter
6:00PM Crisis
7:00PM Swordfish
9:00PM Mr. Go
ZEE STUDIO
10:10AM Where Do We Go Now?
12:30PM Guthy Renker
5:00PM Mars Needs Moms
6:45PM The Hitcher
8:20PM Real Steel
10:30PM Pretty Woman
MOVIES OK
10:50AM Mela
5:05PM Badal
8:00PM Dulhe Raja
11:10PM Hukumat Ki Jung
STAR GOLD
11:45AM Jaani Dushman: Ek Anokhi Kahani
8:00PM The Return of Sikandar
10:15PM International Khiladi
ZEE ACTION
10:30AM Sahhas
5:30PM Kaala Bazaar: Underworld
8:30PM Shera
SONY PIX
10:27AM How to Train Your Dragon
5:02PM The Pink Panther 2
6:59PM The Expendables 2
9:00PM Kung Fu Hustle

Sunday March 30
6:55pm Zee Studio 
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids is a live-action comedy film. The directorial debut of Joe Johnston and produced by Walt Disney Pictures, the film tells the story of an inventor who accidentally shrinks his and his neighbour's kids. 

ZEE CINEMA
11:32AM Shiva: The Super Hero 2
5:51PM Coolie
9:00PM Shahenshah
MOVIES OK
11:30AM Chalte Chalte
5:35PM Amrit
8:00PM Main Insaaf Karoonga
10:45PM Ragada
ZEE ACTION
10:30AM Papiyon Ka Ant
5:30PM Prem Qaidi
8:30PM Anokha Jaanwar
STAR GOLD
11:55AM Makkhi
5:45PM Hero No. 1
8:00PM Bodyguard
10:45PM Return of Ghajini
ZEE CLASSIC
10:26AM Gehri Chaal
8:00PM Mother India
11:28PM Ankhen
INDIA TALKIES
1:00PM Chalte Chalte
4:30PM Salaam-E-Ishq
8:00PM Love Aaj Kal
ZEE STUDIO
10:25AM Play Misty for me
12:30PM Guthy Renker
5:15PM The Hitcher
6:55PM Honey I Shrunk the Kids
8:45PM Stop! or my Mom will Shoot
10:30PM Real Steel

Top

 





HOME PAGE | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Opinions |
| Business | Sports | World | Letters | Chandigarh | Ludhiana | Delhi |
| Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |