Thursday, March 30, 2017
facebook

google plus


Mini female reproductive system may revolutionise drug testingPhoto source: Thinkstock

Mini female reproductive system may revolutionise drug testing

29 Mar 2017 | 9:30 PM

WASHINGTON: Scientists have developed a miniature female reproductive system that fits in the palm of the hand that could help test drugs for safety and effectiveness in women.

[ + read story ]

Washington

Scientists have developed a miniature female reproductive system that fits in the palm of the hand that could help test drugs for safety and effectiveness in women.

The new 3D technology — called EVATAR — is made with human tissue and will enable scientists to conduct much-needed testing of new drugs for safety and effectiveness on the female reproductive system.

EVATAR also will help scientists understand diseases of the female reproductive tract such as endometriosis, fibroids (which affect up to 80 per cent of women), cancer and infertility.

The ultimate goal is to use stem cells of an individual patient and create a personalised model of their reproductive system.

EVATAR, which resembles a small cube, contains 3D models of ovaries, fallopian tubes, the uterus, cervix, vagina and liver with special fluid pumping through all of them that performs the function of blood.

The organ models are able to communicate with each other via secreted substances, including hormones, to closely resemble how they all work together in the body. The organ models are able to communicate with each other via secreted substances, including hormones, to closely resemble how they all work together in the body.

"This will help us develop individualised treatments and see how females may metabolise drugs differently from males," said Teresa Woodruff, director of the Women's Health Research Institute at Northwestern University.

The EVATAR technology is revolutionary because the reproductive tract creates a dynamic culture in which organs communicate with each other rather than having static cells sit in a flat plastic dish.

The model includes ovaries, the uterus, the fallopian tubes, the cervix and vagina. The liver was also included in the system because it metabolises drugs.

The microfluidic device has a series of cables and pumps that cause media (simulated blood) to flow between wells.

The technology also will open doors into the causes of endometriosis, fibroids and some cancers.

"All of these diseases are hormonally driven, and we really don't know how to treat them except for surgery," said Joanna Burdette, of University of Illinois at Chicago.

"This system will enable us to study what causes these diseases and how to treat them," Burdette said.

"The systems are tremendous for the study of cancer, which often is studied as isolated cells rather than system-wide cells. This is going to change the way we study cancer," Burdette said.

The system also will allow scientists to test millions of compounds in the environment and new pharmaceuticals to understand how they affect the reproductive system and many other organs in the body.

The paper was published March 28 in Nature Communications. — PTI

'Bestselling cookbooks give inaccurate food safety advice'

'Bestselling cookbooks give inaccurate food safety advice'

29 Mar 2017 | 1:45 PM

WASHINGTON: Bestselling cookbooks give little useful advice about reducing the risk of foodborne illness, especially in recipes involving meat products, say scientists who found that most of the information in the books are inaccurate and not based on sound science.

New blood test identifies TB infections within hours

New blood test identifies TB infections within hours

28 Mar 2017 | 10:35 AM

WASHINGTON:US researchers said they have successfully developed a blood test that can rapidly diagnose and quantitate the severity of active tuberculosis (TB) cases, an important advance against the major global health threat, a media report said.

Nut allergy tests may be inaccurate

Nut allergy tests may be inaccurate

28 Mar 2017 | 10:34 AM

WASHINGTON: Being allergic to one type of nut may not mean that you need to stop eating all other nuts, according to scientists who claim that certain diagnostic tests may be unreliable.

Choose sunscreen according to your skin tone

Choose sunscreen according to your skin tone

27 Mar 2017 | 2:02 PM

NEW DELHI: Sun protection is essential throughout the year, but it gets yet more important during the summers. Protecting the skin from excessive exposure is the only way to prevent it from aging, sun burns, and skin discoloration.

Cutting salt intake may lower night-time toilet trips

Cutting salt intake may lower night-time toilet trips

26 Mar 2017 | 8:13 PM

TOKYO: Lowering salt intake can significantly reduce excessive night time toilet trips, a condition which is also known as nocturia, a new study has found.

Sleepless night may impair ability to recognise expressions

Sleepless night may impair ability to recognise expressions

26 Mar 2017 | 5:37 PM

LOS ANGELES: Didn’t sleep well last night? You may have a hard time identifying whether people around you are happy or sad, scientists say.

Children with autism may benefit from faecal transplant

Children with autism may benefit from faecal transplant

26 Mar 2017 | 1:11 PM

Faecal transplants – a method of introducing donated healthy microbes into people with gastrointestinal disease to rebalance the gut — may benefit children suffering from autism, a new study has suggested.

Childhood brain cancer survivors at higher heart disease risk

Childhood brain cancer survivors at higher heart disease risk

25 Mar 2017 | 8:51 PM

TORONTO: Survivors of childhood brain tumours are at an increased risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and early death because of higher overall fat tissue, a new study has warned.

10 mins of vigorous exercise may cut diabetes risk in kids

10 mins of vigorous exercise may cut diabetes risk in kids

25 Mar 2017 | 9:02 PM

WASHINGTON: Ten minutes of high-intensity physical activity every day may help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, a new study claims.

Mother's hug may boost immunity, health of baby

Mother's hug may boost immunity, health of baby

24 Mar 2017 | 4:11 PM

NEW DELHI:A mother's hug can boost immunity, stabilise heart rate and maintain body temperature of the baby, say doctors in a survey which shows that an embrace does more than simply putting a smile on your little one's face.

Weight-bearing exercises may boost bone health in men

Weight-bearing exercises may boost bone health in men

23 Mar 2017 | 9:38 PM

LOS ANGELES: Practicing weight-bearing exercises such as resistance training and various types of jumps may increase bone density in men, a new study has found.

India urged to intensify research for multi-drug resistant TB

India urged to intensify research for multi-drug resistant TB

23 Mar 2017 | 9:31 PM

NEW DELHI: As India continues to account for 24 per cent of the world's total Tuberculosis (TB) burden, the Indian Society for Clinical Research (ISCR) on Thursday called for a comprehensive research in multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis, citing that resistance to antimicrobials is growing at a faster rate than discovery of newer and more potent drugs.

New test may predict onset of Alzheimer's

New test may predict onset of Alzheimer's

22 Mar 2017 | 10:59 PM

LOS ANGELES:A new test that allows individuals to calculate their age-specific risk of Alzheimer's disease based on their genetic information has been developed by researchers including one of Indian origin.

Simple blood test may help detect cancer early

Simple blood test may help detect cancer early

21 Mar 2017 | 1:55 PM

NEW YORK: Now doctors may soon be able to detect and monitor a patient's cancer with a simple blood test, reducing or eliminating the need for more invasive procedures, according to a new research.

Functional 'beating' human heart muscle created

Functional 'beating' human heart muscle created

20 Mar 2017 | 9:44 PM

MELBOURNE: Scientists have created a functional 'beating' human heart muscle from stem cells, a significant step forward in cardiac disease research.

Your high BP might just be a case of misdiagnosis

Your high BP might just be a case of misdiagnosis

20 Mar 2017 | 12:59 PM

TORONTO: Nearly 20 per cent of people receiving treatment for hypertension do not actually have a problem, but they are often misdiagnosed as a result of doctors using manual devices to measure blood pressure, a study has showed.

Scientific breakthrough to aid malaria vacccine research

Scientific breakthrough to aid malaria vacccine research

20 Mar 2017 | 12:51 PM

CANBERRA: Australian scientists have discovered a "key molecule", which can kill microbes that infect the human liver, a breakthrough experts believe could bring a malaria vaccine one step closer.

Skinny jeans, high heels may impact women’s health

Skinny jeans, high heels may impact women’s health

19 Mar 2017 | 10:14 PM

LONDON: Love skinny jeans, oversized bags and high heels? These fashion choices may be damaging your body, scientists have warned.

New lip-reading AI system may help people with hearing loss

New lip-reading AI system may help people with hearing loss

19 Mar 2017 | 9:56 PM

LONDON: Oxford scientists have developed a new artificial intelligence programme that can lip-read more accurately than people, an advance that will help those who suffer from hearing loss.

Sleep apnea in children may impact brain development

Sleep apnea in children may impact brain development

18 Mar 2017 | 10:46 PM

WASHINGTON:Untreated sleep apnea in children causes loss of grey matter - brain cells involved in movement, memory, emotions, speech, perception, decision making and self-control, researchers including one of Indian origin have found.

LIFE+STYLE
  • Richa rich

    Richa rich

    This lovely Punjaban, Richa Chaddha, has some strong and happy memories of Punjab and a deep connect with her home state.

  • Star Track
  • Of sob stories and men...

    Of sob stories and men...

    To encourage storytelling among individuals, author, Bollywood director, scriptwriter, lyricist, and photographer, Neelesh Misra realised that men in India do have a soft spot, which they try to otherwise hide.

  • SpectrumSingle child, multiple issues

    Single child, multiple issues

    A game of street cricket breaks out into a fight; something every kid in the game knew was bound to happen sooner or later for they were playing with Rahul. The kids refuse every time he wants to play with them.

  • Panjab University: Journey and evolution

    The University of Punjab at Lahore was set up on October 14, 1882. It was the fourth university of India although it was the first university that expanded its scope from being an examining university to teaching and examining both.

more Spectrum...

YOUR WORLD AND YOU