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New smartphone app to help manage mental illnessPhoto for representational purpose only. iStock

New smartphone app to help manage mental illness

16 Aug 2017 | 7:58 PM

WASHINGTON: Scientists have developed a smartphone app to help middle-aged and older adults self-manage their mental illness and other chronic conditions.

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Washington, August 16

Scientists have developed a smartphone app to help middle-aged and older adults self-manage their mental illness and other chronic conditions.

The app takes patients through 10 sessions over a period of about three months, covering topics such as stress vulnerability and illness, medication adherence and strategies, and substance and medication abuse.

Physicians can remotely monitor app use, and intervene when problems are detected, facilitating telemedicine for less accessible populations.

Researchers at Dartmouth College in the US tested the app’s usability. They found that 10 participants (mean age of 55.3 years) with serious mental illness and other chronic health conditions reported a high level of usability and satisfaction with the smartphone application.

They found that even patients with limited technical abilities could use the app successfully.

“The use of mobile health interventions by adults with serious mental illness is a promising approach that has been shown to be highly feasible and acceptable,” said Karen Fortuna from Dartmouth College.

These technologies are associated with many advantages compared with traditional psychosocial interventions, including the potential for individually tailored, just-in-time delivery along with wide dissemination and high population impact, researchers said.

The process of adapting an existing psychosocial intervention to a smartphone intervention requires adaptation for a high-risk group with limited health and technology literacy, they said.

“Smartphone applications also potentially facilitate patient engagement in participatory, personalised and preventative care,” Fortuna said.

“As the health care industry increasingly embraces prevention and illness self-management, it is important for physicians and patients to be actively involved in designing and developing new technologies supporting these approaches,” Fortuna added.

The study was published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. PTI

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WASHINGTON: Children who get more sleep are at a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a study published in a US journal has said.

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LONDON: Lack of early diagnosis is leading India towards a breast cancer epidemic, according to scientists who suggest that educating men may be key to encouraging women to seek help earlier.

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TORONTO: Do you often forget carrying your keys or umbrella with you while stepping out of your house? A simple memory trick may help!

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12 Aug 2017 | 10:14 PM

NEW YORK:Munching on a handful of almonds daily may boost the levels of 'good' cholesterol in the body while simultaneously improving the way it functions, a study claims.

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SYDNEY: Australian researchers have discovered a dietary supplement which can prevent miscarriages, and many different types of birth defects for pregnant women.

Beer may help overcome creative block

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LONDON: Suffering a creative block? Drinking a pint of beer may trigger productivity and help you think out of the box for your artistic tasks, a study suggests.

Facebook photos may help diagnose depression

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WASHINGTON: Your Facebook or Instagram photos could tell if you are depressed, thanks to scientists who have developed a new computer programme that could diagnose depression from social media posts better than doctors.

Playing action video games may harm your brain

Playing action video games may harm your brain

08 Aug 2017 | 2:07 PM

TORONTO: Playing action video games may cause depletion of grey matter in the brain, increasing the risk of diseases such as depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, a study has warned.

Smartphone app can predict disease risk based on health inputs

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08 Aug 2017 | 12:36 PM

NEW DELHI: A new smartphone app, developed by a Gurgaon-based start-up, can provide 'smart reports' that may predict the user's risk of diseases and expose hidden disorders based on their symptoms and lifestyle inputs.

Opioid use higher among cancer survivors

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07 Aug 2017 | 3:27 PM

TORONTO: Opioid prescription use is more common in cancer survivors than in individuals without a history of the disease, a study led by an Indian origin scientist has found.

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IIT scientists develop silk mats that could treat arthritis

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NEW DELHI: Scientists from IIT Guwahati have synthesised mats made of silk-proteins and bioactive glass fibres that they believe can assist the growth of bone cells and repair worn-out joints in arthritis patients.

Source of human heartbeat revealed in 3D

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LONDON: Scientists have revealed the source of human heartbeat in unprecedented detail, an advance that may help surgeons repair hearts without damaging precious tissue.

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HOUSTON: The answer to combat sleep disorders may not be in the brain, say scientists who have found that a protein present in the muscles can lessen the effects of sleep loss.

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