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FLASH
  • Akhilesh admits talks are on for alliance with the Congress; announcement soon
  • Majithia would be in jail by April 15; note the date, says Kejriwal in Chandigarh
  • Punjab BJP leader Vijay Sampla likely to meet party chief Amit Shah today.
  • BJP has no presence in Punjab, it only plays second fiddle to Akali Dal: Navjot Kaur Sidhu


'Online daters look for partners with same education level'Photo: Thinkstock

'Online daters look for partners with same education level'

16 Jan 2017 | 10:00 PM

MELBOURNE:Online daters are most likely to contact people with the same level of education as them, but are less fussy about an intellectual match as they get older, according to a new study.

[ + read story ]

Melbourne, January 16

Online daters are most likely to contact people with the same level of education as them, but are less fussy about an intellectual match as they get older, according to a new study.

The comprehensive study by researchers at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia analysed the online dating interactions of more than 41,000 Australians aged between 18-80.

"Selecting a mate can be one of the largest psychological and economic decisions a person can make and has long been the subject of social science research across a range of disciplines, all of which acknowledge one phenomenon: positive assortative mating behaviour (homogamy)," said Stephen Whyte from QUT.

Traditionally, humans look for certain characteristics and traits in a partner, including symmetry in areas such as: age, aesthetics, attractiveness, personality, culture, education, religion and race; however the internet has dramatically altered this process.

"The internet has completely changed how people choose dating partners to find love. Our study is a step towards understanding how technology is impacting on mate choice decisions based on education," the researchers said.

"Cyber dating permits multiple partner choices in real time, which allows for a significantly greater available choice of potential mates. This increased pool means greater opportunity for selection of partners with lower, similar or even higher levels of certain characteristics," they said.

"This includes education, which is commonly used in human mating behaviour as a proxy for resources and future provision as it can represent economic advantages," they added.

The study included people whose ages ranged from millennials to octogenarians, demonstrating that online dating can give people from all walks of life the opportunity to experience a new way of finding a relationship.

Whyte said another interesting finding from the study was that there was a difference in the way in which men and women looked at education levels in potential partners and also how this changed depending on the life stage of the participants.

"The more educated cohort tends to care less about matching the same level of education as they get older," said Whyte.

"Older women in particular have a greater likelihood of contacting potential partners who are less educated than themselves but conversely, younger males fall into this category as well," Whyte added.

The study was published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences. — PTI

Therapy may change your personality

Therapy may change your personality

16 Jan 2017 | 9:55 PM

WASHINGTON:Personality, long thought to be fundamental and resistant to change, may shift in response to therapy, a new study has found.

New soy-based air filter can capture toxic chemicals

New soy-based air filter can capture toxic chemicals

16 Jan 2017 | 1:32 PM

WASHINGTON: Scientists have developed a natural, biodegradable and inexpensive soy-based air filter that can capture toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, which current air filters cannot.

Stunning new view of Jupiter shows iconic Great Red Spot

Stunning new view of Jupiter shows iconic Great Red Spot

16 Jan 2017 | 1:08 PM

WASHINGTON: NASA has released a stunning new view of a crescent Jupiter, which shows the iconic Great Red Spot, along with a series of storms shaped like white ovals known as the 'string of pearls'.

‘Big chill’ after asteroid strike likely killed dinosaurs

‘Big chill’ after asteroid strike likely killed dinosaurs

14 Jan 2017 | 8:08 PM

BERLIN: The well known asteroid impact resulted in long-lasting cooling on the Earth, which may have contributed to the sudden extinction of the land-living dinosaurs 66 million years ago, a new study suggests.

Men more likely to show-off on social media

Men more likely to show-off on social media

14 Jan 2017 | 11:47 AM

LONDON: In order to show-off to friends, collect ‘likes’ on social media and to feel good about themselves, men are more likely to post their privacy away, a study has found.

Indian pepper holds key for new cancer-fighting drug

Indian pepper holds key for new cancer-fighting drug

13 Jan 2017 | 10:15 PM

HOUSTON: The Indian long pepper, widely popular for spicing up food, may soon be used as a potential cancer treatment drug, according to a new study.

Puppies respond more readily to ‘baby talk’

Puppies respond more readily to ‘baby talk’

12 Jan 2017 | 5:28 PM

WASHINGTON: Puppies respond more readily than adult dogs when people talk to them just like they would with babies — more slowly and with a higher tone, a new study has found.

‘Face with tears of joy’ world’s most popular emoji

‘Face with tears of joy’ world’s most popular emoji

11 Jan 2017 | 8:00 PM

WASHINGTON: People worldwide love the ‘face with tears of joy’ emoji, except the romantic French who prefer the ‘heart’ emoji, according to a new study that analysed 427 million messages from nearly four million smartphone users in 212 countries and regions.

Chimps create unique sticks to drink water

Chimps create unique sticks to drink water

10 Jan 2017 | 10:07 PM

LONDON: Chimpanzees in Ivory Coast create special tools for drinking water by chewing the end of a stick to turn it into a soft, fluid-absorbing brush, scientists have found.

Smartphones to evaluate sleep disorders while awake

Smartphones to evaluate sleep disorders while awake

10 Jan 2017 | 10:05 PM

JERUSALEM: A new smartphone system developed by scientists can diagnose sleep disorders while a person is awake, a breakthrough may be more convenient, inexpensive way to detect obstructive sleep apnea.

New model may help internet addicts reduce usage

New model may help internet addicts reduce usage

10 Jan 2017 | 10:02 PM

NEW YORK: Internet addicts do not always feel guilty about their usage, and in many cases do not even perceive their usage as problematic, preventing them from trying to correct their behaviours, a study has found.

Hubble detects 'shadow play' caused by possible planet

Hubble detects 'shadow play' caused by possible planet

10 Jan 2017 | 12:09 PM

WASHINGTON: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured a "shadow play" caused by a possible planet that is moving counterclockwise around a gas-and-dust disk encircling a young star.

Stardust makes up 97 per cent of our bodies!

Stardust makes up 97 per cent of our bodies!

09 Jan 2017 | 9:20 PM

HOUSTON: Ninety-seven per cent of the human body consists of stardust, claim scientists who have measured the distribution of essential elements of life in over 150,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

Bionic woman: Chinese robot turns on the charm

Bionic woman: Chinese robot turns on the charm

09 Jan 2017 | 9:13 PM

SHANGHAI: “Jia Jia” can hold a simple conversation and make specific facial expressions when asked, and her creator believes the eerily life-like robot heralds a future of cyborg labour in China.

Earwax may inspire high-tech filters, adhesives in robotics

Earwax may inspire high-tech filters, adhesives in robotics

08 Jan 2017 | 4:21 PM

WASHINGTON: Earwax, considered to be just an unappealing substance by most, may have potential as a high-tech filter or adhesive for use in robotics and other fields, scientists say.

Berry fossil may show how potatoes, tomatoes evolved

Berry fossil may show how potatoes, tomatoes evolved

08 Jan 2017 | 4:16 PM

WASHINGTON: Scientists have discovered a 52-million-year-old fossil of a berry that may help understand the evolution of the economically important plant family that includes potatoes, peppers and tomatoes.

Why some people don’t like music decoded

Why some people don’t like music decoded

08 Jan 2017 | 4:08 PM

TORONTO: People who do not like music at all may have reduced connectivity between two regions in the brain linked to sound processing and reward, a new study has found.

Even presence of smartphone may distract you from work

Even presence of smartphone may distract you from work

08 Jan 2017 | 3:35 PM

TOKYO: The mere presence of a smartphone can adversely affect your ability to focus on a given task, particularly if you are not a frequent internet user, a new study has found.

Hubble creates interstellar road map for future galactic trek

Hubble creates interstellar road map for future galactic trek

07 Jan 2017 | 10:11 PM

WASHINGTON: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is creating a road map for the two Voyager spacecraft, which will travel through unexplored territories beyond our solar system, by measuring the material along the probes' future trajectories.

Hubble spots exocomets plunging into young star

Hubble spots exocomets plunging into young star

07 Jan 2017 | 7:23 PM

WASHINGTON: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered comets plunging into a 23-million-years old star located 95 light-years from Earth.

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