Tuesday, January 17, 2017
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FLASH
  • Cong denies Ludhiana East ticket to ex-minister Manish Tewari in favour of local councillor Sanjeev Talwar
  • Akhilesh admits talks are on for alliance with the Congress; announcement soon
  • Majithia would be in jail by April 15; note the date, says Kejriwal in Chandigarh
  • Punjab BJP leader Vijay Sampla likely to meet party chief Amit Shah today.
  • BJP has no presence in Punjab, it only plays second fiddle to Akali Dal: Navjot Kaur Sidhu


Bee, wasp stings more dangerous than snake, spider bites

17 Jan 2017 | 10:15 AM

SYDNEY: An Australian research has discovered that venom from bees and wasps, rather than those from jellyfish, spiders or snakes, poses a biggest public health threat, a study has revealed.

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Sydney

An Australian research has discovered that venom from bees and wasps, rather than those from jellyfish, spiders or snakes, poses a biggest public health threat, a study has revealed.

The Australia-first national analysis of 13 years' data on bites and stings from venomous creatures, undertaken by the University of Melbourne, revealed that bees and wasps were responsible for a third of hospitalisations for venomous stings and bites, Xinhua news agency reported.

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Spider bites were the second most prevalent cause of hospitalisation in the 13-year period, accounting for 30 per cent of all admissions, while snake bites were third at 15 per cent.

Overall, 42,000 people were admitted to hospital for venomous bites or stings in the 13-year period and 64 people were killed, 34 of which were due to an allergic reaction to an insect bite that caused anaphylactic shock.

Ronelle Welton, a public health expert at the Australian Venom Unit at the University of Melbourne, said she was surprised that there were so many deaths and hospitalisations in the populated coastal areas of Australia.

"More than half of deaths happened at home, and almost two-thirds (64 percent) occurred, not in the isolated areas we might expect, but rather, in major cities and inner-regional areas where healthcare is readily accessible," said Welton. Welton said she believes the reason insect bites were so deadly was that people could be complacent in seeking medical attention and anaphylaxis can kill quickly.

Three quarters of those who died as a result of snake bites made it to hospital compared to just 44 per cent of those who were killed by insect bites.

—IANS

Bee, wasp stings more dangerous than snake, spider bites
Vape pens may up desire to smoke

Vape pens may up desire to smoke

16 Jan 2017 | 10:01 PM

WASHINGTON: Watching someone use new generation e-cigarettes or vape pens may stimulate the urge to smoke in young adults, even in those who have never smoked before, a new study has found.

Sunbeds may up deadly skin cancer risk

Sunbeds may up deadly skin cancer risk

16 Jan 2017 | 10:01 PM

LONDON:Sunbeds, used in indoor tanning sessions, may put people at increased risk of melanoma - the most dangerous type of skin cancer, a new study has warned.

Schizophrenia may increase diabetes risk

Schizophrenia may increase diabetes risk

14 Jan 2017 | 8:03 PM

LONDON: People with schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are adjusted for, a new study has found.

Calling your kids ‘fat’ may make them gain weight

Calling your kids ‘fat’ may make them gain weight

14 Jan 2017 | 8:04 PM

LONDON: Parents, take note! Telling your children that they are ‘overweight’ may make them gain weight as they grow up, new research has warned.

Malaria infection depends on number of parasites, not bites

Malaria infection depends on number of parasites, not bites

13 Jan 2017 | 10:06 PM

LONDON: Researchers have, for the first time, found that the chances of a person developing malaria infection is determined by the number of parasites each individual mosquito carries, not the number of mosquito bites a person receives.

Boy or girl? Mother's BP may predict sex of baby!

Boy or girl? Mother's BP may predict sex of baby!

13 Jan 2017 | 1:04 PM

TORONTO: The sex of a baby may be predicted by the mother's blood pressure, according to a new study which found that women with lower BP before pregnancy are more likely to give birth to a girl.

Stress may increase heart disease, stroke risk

Stress may increase heart disease, stroke risk

12 Jan 2017 | 5:22 PM

LONDON: People with heightened activity in the amygdala — a region of the brain involved in stress — may have a greater risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study published in The Lancet journal today that may lead to new treatments for stress-related cardiovascular problems.

Transfusions of old blood may be dangerous

Transfusions of old blood may be dangerous

11 Jan 2017 | 7:58 PM

NEW YORK: The oldest blood available for transfusions releases large and potentially harmful amounts of iron into patients’ bloodstreams, warns a new study which recommends reducing the maximum storage limit of red blood cells from six to five weeks.

Just a 45-minute brisk walk a week can improve arthritis

Just a 45-minute brisk walk a week can improve arthritis

10 Jan 2017 | 2:38 PM

NEW YORK: Older people suffering from arthritis can remain fit by engaging in 45 minutes of moderate physical activity such as brisk walking a week, says a study.

Drug that 'melts' cancer cells approved for human use

Drug that 'melts' cancer cells approved for human use

10 Jan 2017 | 2:07 PM

MELBOURNE: A drug that may melt away cancer cells has been approved in Australia for use in patients with a type of leukaemia who have not responded to existing therapies.

Weekend exercise alone has significant health benefits

Weekend exercise alone has significant health benefits

10 Jan 2017 | 2:07 PM

HOUSTON: People exercising only on weekends need to stop feeling guilty for not being able to workout regularly due to their busy lifestyle as they see the same health benefits as those who do it daily, a study has said.

Smoking costs $1 trillion; soon to kill 8 million a year

Smoking costs $1 trillion; soon to kill 8 million a year

10 Jan 2017 | 2:08 PM

GENEVA: Smoking costs the global economy more than $1 trillion a year, and will kill one third more people by 2030 than it does now, according to a study by the World Health Organisation and the US National Cancer Institute published on Tuesday.

Study links antacids in pregnancy to asthma in kids

Study links antacids in pregnancy to asthma in kids

09 Jan 2017 | 9:21 PM

PARIS: Children of women who take heartburn medicine during pregnancy are a third more likely to develop asthma, according to a study published today.

Table salt used to turn surgical masks into virus killers

Table salt used to turn surgical masks into virus killers

08 Jan 2017 | 4:14 PM

TORONTO: Scientists have used table salt to give common surgical masks the ability to trap and kill virus, an advance that may help keep deadly infections such as MERS and SARS at bay.

Counselling, antidepressants improve personality

Counselling, antidepressants improve personality

08 Jan 2017 | 4:12 PM

WASHINGTON: People who undergo therapies such as counseling or antidepressant use for mental health issues have better outcomes and personality trait changes than those who do not, a new study has found.

Preterm babies fare well in early language development

Preterm babies fare well in early language development

08 Jan 2017 | 3:56 PM

WASHINGTON: Preterm babies perform just as well as their full-term counterparts in a developmental task linked to language and cognition, a new study has found.

Stress may cause gastrointestinal issues in autistic kids

Stress may cause gastrointestinal issues in autistic kids

07 Jan 2017 | 10:17 PM

WASHINGTON: Stress may cause kids with autism to develop gastrointestinal issues, according to a new study that may pave the way for therapies to treat the condition.

Witnessing fear in others can alter our brain wiring

Witnessing fear in others can alter our brain wiring

07 Jan 2017 | 10:15 PM

WASHINGTON: Witnessing fear in others may change how information flows in the brain, a new study has found which may help understand how post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is caused.

Elusive structure of HIV machinery cracked

Elusive structure of HIV machinery cracked

06 Jan 2017 | 9:55 PM

LOS ANGELES: Scientists have cracked the elusive atomic structure of a key machinery that allows HIV to integrate into human host DNA and replicate in the body, an advance that may lead to the development of new drugs for the deadly virus.

New method to heal wounds without scars

New method to heal wounds without scars

06 Jan 2017 | 9:43 PM

WASHINGTON: In a breakthrough, researchers have found a way to manipulate wounds to heal as regenerated skin rather than scar tissue by transforming the most common type of cells found in wounds into fat cells.

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