Wednesday, October 3, 2001, Chandigarh, India



S O C I E T Y

STYLE FILE
Clean cuts & earthy tones rule this autumn
Arshiya Kapadia
AUTUMN is the season when the trees shed golden-brown leaves and thereís a slight nip in the air. Itís that time of the year again...when fashion messiahs predict trends for what they term as the autumn/winter (A/W), 2001, collections.

Get adventurous in trekker trousers
A
S the weather begins to cool down, and the rains are a thing of the past, itís just the right time to think of a quick getaway. Perhaps trekking up in the hills is your style, or perhaps just a leisurely stroll in the park is what you prefer. Whatever your preference, chill out in the latest leisure style trend.

Saree keeps pace with changing trends
Piyali Dasgupta
F
ASHION, haute couture, avant garde, style gurus... somehow these words are not restricted to fashion or lifestyle glossies anymore. Keeping in step with the traditional fashion capitals of the world like London, Paris, Rome or New York, India has emerged as a fledgling, though exciting location.








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STYLE FILE
Clean cuts & earthy tones rule this autumn
Arshiya Kapadia

The futuristic look defines the current trends
The futuristic look defines the current trends

AUTUMN is the season when the trees shed golden-brown leaves and thereís a slight nip in the air. Itís that time of the year again...when fashion messiahs predict trends for what they term as the autumn/winter (A/W), 2001, collections.

While the autumn/winter collections cause a major stir in the western world and there is frenzy in the garment industry, the fever hasnít yet caught on much in India.

While some avante garde Indian designers like Hemant Trivedi and Tarun Tahiliani have revealed their autumn collections and Ritu Beri has just had an autumn/Fall show in Paris, by and large the Indian market remains lukewarm to these trends. Thatís because we donít really have a buyer-oriented market for autumn/winter, says couturier Salim Asgharally.

The look thatís in:

  • Fur-collared jackets, jackets with bright fur trimmings and coats with coloured fringes are hot for the chilly months ahead.

  • Unfussy hairstyles and minimal accessories are the call of the season.

  • Mixínímatch, add a dash of colour and spice to your attire whether at work or at play: Colourful head scarves and chain belts add a touch of colour and class to a well-cut jacket suit.

  • High heels are back. So are ankle-length boots and peep-toe shoes.

  • Pop-art designs and meshy prints go well with wet-look fabrics. Team them well with a plain trouser or skirt, to look sophisticated and sexy!

  • Crimson red and creamy chocolate are two of the hottest colours this season. While ivory and white are the preferred colours, make your choice.

  • Polo and funnel necks are very hip this autumn/winter. Teamed with a jacket they are the Ďlookí.

"For Indians, itís mostly wedding collections that dominate in these months ó as post-Divali itís shaadi time for us and not really much of autumn/winter", he adds tongue-in-cheek.

However, some of the autumn trends have caught on here too and hereís what the top-of-the-line designers have to say:

Elements: Clean, clear lines and asymmetrical cuts are in. The way an outfit is draped is the key ó the cut and presentation, both are equally important.

Prints: The neo-retro look of the 60s joins hands with the computer-graphic figures of today to culminate in a look thatís trendy and yet futuristic.

The figures are fuzzy with stripes, plaids, squares, triangles and all sorts of geometric prints are cool.

The designs are bold in all hues, ranging from the bright to the subdued.

Animal prints, pop-art designs, mosaic prints, all teamed with plain fabric, work wonders.

Colours: The colour palette this autumn varies from the earthy tones of muddy brown, camel, chocolate and rust to red, black, grey, olive and white.

However, whether itís the prints or the colours ó this autumn itís all about becoming bold.

Among Indian designers, Krishna Mehta prefers white. While Manish Malhotraís latest creations are all adorned by his trademark pastels.

Fabrics: Most designers are going in for georgettes, chiffons and wet-look fabrics like satin. Corduroys, faux fur, tweed, wool, cotton, leather and stretch fabric like lurex are in too.ó INFS



 

Get adventurous in trekker trousers

AS the weather begins to cool down, and the rains are a thing of the past, itís just the right time to think of a quick getaway. Perhaps trekking up in the hills is your style, or perhaps just a leisurely stroll in the park is what you prefer. Whatever your preference, chill out in the latest leisure style trend.

The hottest newcomers at lifestyle stores in the city this September/October are the trekking outfits that come in three colour combinations for men and women, in a washed butter-soft blend of nylon and cotton.

The menís colours include off-white, olive green and navy, while the options for women are ginger (a pinky-rust), a pale pink and off-white. Co-ordinated with these there are matching multi-pocket vests, which have a nylon net underlay at the back for ventilation. Both the trekker trousers and the vests have contrast tabs and zippers ó olive with off-white, navy with off-white and off-white with olive for men. The womenís styles offer contrasts of pink with olive, off-white with olive and ginger with off-white. A matching range of walking shorts come in off-white, pink and ginger.

The most important feature of the trekker trousers, launched by Wills in the city, is their versatility ó the menís trousers zip off into shorts, while the womenís pants shorten into capris. More importantly, all these come in many sizes to fit all figures. For men, the sizes include, small, medium, large, XL and XXL. For women, the sizes include extra small, medium, large and XL.

To go with these trousers and vests, there is also a new range of three-quarter sleeved womenís tops in cotton/lycra. These come in fine stripes of greens, blues or pinks, with contrast piping at the neck. For men, the range of colourful crew neck tees with contrast colour bands, offer plenty of scope to ring in the changes. In addition, there are loose Hawaiian shirts with a leaf print in cool poplin.

Twill boot-cut cargoes have taken over from the earlier cargos with four different colour options to choose from. Teamed with cap-sleeved stretch tees in cotton/lycra, these are the urban city favourites for women.

For men, the demand for Irish linen shirts continues unabated. Due to popular demand, half-sleeved white and the highly popular pale blue in Irish linen have been reintroduced.



 

Saree keeps pace with changing trends
Piyali Dasgupta

FASHION, haute couture, avant garde, style gurus... somehow these words are not restricted to fashion or lifestyle glossies anymore. Keeping in step with the traditional fashion capitals of the world like London, Paris, Rome or New York, India has emerged as a fledgling, though exciting location.

The saree has been subjected to a lot of innovations over the years
The saree has been subjected to a lot of innovations over the years

Fashion as an industry is still evolving in India. Designers function according to their own rules and as of now, there is no authoritative body protecting their common interest or framing common guidelines. Institutes for fashion design have mushroomed at a steady rate around the country, but few can compare to international standards.

Indian designers like Ritu Beri, J.J. Vallaya, Ritu Kumar and Tarun Tahiliani have made an entry into the international fashion scene. Though fashion is evolving in India, Indian fashion has had a long-standing influence on the West. French style guru, Jean Paul Gautlier, on a recent visit to India, has spoken of the inspiration he derived from the bright colours so prominent in India. Figures from Indian mythology have also inspired many western designers over the years. In fact, spotting a Cherie Blair in a embroidered salwar-kurta is not such a rare sight any more.

One aspect of Indian fashion, in fact, Indian tradition, has steadfastly withstood the changing hues of fashion ó the saree. This 12-yard cloth has metamorphosed to meet changing trends in fashion, though retaining its original grace and beauty.

Depending on the region of India, the saree varies in length from nine to 12 yards. The nine-yard saree is generally worn in the western and eastern parts of the country, with fewer pleats to make up the length. Over the years, the saree has adapted to different forms of fashion. Asha Parekh sizzled in the 60s in the three-tier sarees. Heroines draped themselves in sequined and bead-embroidered sarees. Heroines have always drenched themselves in see-through white sarees. So the saree has been firmly established in Hindi film scene.

Designers have long been experimenting with the traditional saree. Using hand painting, block prints or traditional motifs like ikat, contemporary designers have kept the saree alive to changing fashion trends, though hinging on a glorious tradition. The latest collections this season focus on traditional patolas and ikat, as also on hand-printed sarees. The Ďmoderní look has been achieved through abstract designs.

In one collection, the saree has again adapted itself to another very modern and Ďiní lookócrystal. Swarovski crystal, which is the latest favourite of Indian designers, has been used to embellish crepe and georgette saris.

Designers like Tarun Tahiliani and Shahab Durazi have used Swarovski extensively.

Keeping pace with the saree is the choli or blouse, which has also changed with the times and designs. Most designer sarees are worn with similar crystal or bead and shell-encrusted cholis. Traditional sarees have matching cholis too. The radical change in cholis has been in the cut. Forget those round and v-necked cholis with full-length sleeves. The new cholis have spaghetti straps and non-existent backs. Bustier sets the mood for a party.

Now take it a step further. Forget about matching centres or tailors to sew blouses. Opt for a body-hugging top in lycra or velvet and team it with a saree. For cold days, a turtle-neck top will do just as well.

Every season brings new threads and styles in fashion, making the old things redundant. But there is this one piece of garment which does not loose its lustre even after years ó the saree. Wear one and one thing is certain, youíll never be out of vogue.



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