Thursday, October 11, 2001, Chandigarh, India





W O R L D


After the second day of attacks on Afghanistan, security has been beefed up at American and British consulates in Karachi.
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Bush urges halt to anti-US protests
Warns of lengthy military campaign

Washington, October 10
US President George W. Bush has urged protesters assailing US-led strikes on targets in Afghanistan to reconsider, saying that the campaign against terrorism “is in the best interests of freedom and humankind.”

Laden tops US list of terrorists
Washington, October 10
The White House today released a list of 22 “most wanted terrorists,” including Islamic militant Osama bin Laden and others indicted in connection with five major incidents in the 1980s and 1990s.

USA slams Sudan for bombings, still wants its help
Washington, October 10
The USA which has recruited Sudan for its coalition against international terrorism, has blamed the African country’s government for the “senseless” bombing of UN food operations.



British divers, left to right, Mathew Atkinson, Ian Chapple, Peter Clark and Steve Apwood celebrate the lifting of the Kursk nuclear submarine aboard the salvage vessel Mayo in the Barents Sea on Monday. — AP/PTI

Bio-terror experts have testified at a hearing before a Senate committee, calling for a clear mandate and practical measures to defend the USA from the threat of bio-terror attacks. 
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THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
A Sudanese protester kisses a poster of Osama bin Laden during a demonstration in Khartoum, on Tuesday. Thousands of Sudanese demonstrated in central Khartoum to denounce the US and British military action in Afghanistan. 
— AP/PTI photo

UN sanctions on 11 Laden organisations
United Nations, October 10
The United Nations has ordered member states to freeze the funds and assets of 27 organisations, individuals and firms linked to suspected terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden.

Afghan Shoora in offing
Islamabad, October 10
The stage appears to be set to form a 20-member joint council of Afghan representatives once the Taliban Government collapses under the weight of the ongoing attacks by the United States and its allies, reports said.

Afghans stone Pak, French scribes
Peshawar, October 10
Detained French journalist Michel Peyrard and two Pakistani colleagues were displayed on the streets of a Taliban-held city and stoned by angry residents, a Taliban source said today.

EARLIER STORIES
 

Asylum seekers are rescued by Australian naval personnel (far L) from the HMAS Adelaide in the Indian Ocean, about 120 nautical miles (200 km) from Christmas island, on Sunday. The Australian navy was forced to rescue a group of mainly Iraqi asylum seekers after they sabotaged their rickety Indonesian vessel, officials said. Australian Prime Minister John Howard said on Wednesday he would make inquiries after doubt was cast on government claims asylum seekers threw children off their boat when they were intercepted by the navy.
 — Reuters

Anti-US protests rock Jakarta
Jakarta, October 10
As Jakarta was rocked today by another day of anti-US demonstrations, the Indonesian police fired teargas on crowds of student protesters in front on parliament building and arrested six others near the American Embassy.

White House rejects Al-Qaida message
Washington, October 10
The White House said a statement from the Al-Qaida network run by Osama bin Laden, whom Washington blames for September 11 terror strikes, did nothing but bolster its view that the group must be eradicated.

Alliance wrests key city
Dushanbe, October 10
Northern Alliance troops have captured the strategically important city of Panjkaria in Samangan province, said Muhitdin Mekhti, adviser to the Ambassador of the Islamic State of Afghanistan in Tajikistan today.

Khaleda Zia sworn in PM
Dhaka, October 10
Begum Khaleda Zia was sworn in today as Bangladesh’s Prime Minister. President Shahabuddin Ahmed administered the oath of office to Ms Khaleda in a ceremony at the Presidential palace.

Nobel winners work as a team
Boulder, Colorado, October 10
They are a team, whether working in a laboratory on a project that will rewrite science books or finishing each other’s sentences at a news conference after winning a share of the Nobel Prize for Physics.

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Bush urges halt to anti-US protests
Warns of lengthy military campaign

Washington, October 10
US President George W. Bush has urged protesters assailing US-led strikes on targets in Afghanistan to reconsider, saying that the campaign against terrorism “is in the best interests of freedom and humankind.”

“I understand people’s willingness to protest, but they should not protest the decisions our coalition is making because it is in the best interests of freedom and humankind,” the President told reporters.

Mr Bush drew a sharp distinction between Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers, who have refused to turn over suspected terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden and members of his Al-Qaida network, and the long-suffering Afghan population.

He emphasised that Washington was dropping food and medicine for Afghans even as its missiles and bombs struck sites linked to the Taliban.

“Ours is a compassionate nation ... there are thousands of starving Afghans because there is a Taliban government in place that has caused starvation and deprivation and discrimination. And they are now housing terrorists,” said Mr Bush.

US reprisals, which the President announced on Sunday, have led to protests throughout the Muslim world and even in some spots in Europe and the USA.

The deadliest violence was in Pakistan, where three people were killed during violent rallies by Islamic militants.

Earlier, Mr Bush publicly contradicted Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf warning again of a protracted military campaign in his war on terrorism.

Mr Bush appeared miffed yesterday when asked by a reporter about General Musharraf’s public statements that the US aerial campaign against terrorist camps and Taliban military targets in Afghanistan would be “short”.

“I don’t know who told the Pakistani President that,” Mr Bush snapped. “Generally, you know, we don’t talk about military plans.”

Mr Bush had just explained his decision to limit classified briefings to members of the US Congress because of press leaks that he said endangered the lives of US troops by divulging military plans.

Mr Bush had formally notified Congress of his decision to deploy US troops in combat in Afghanistan today and warned that the deployment could be lengthy.

“It is not possible to know at this time either the duration of combat operations or the scope and duration of the deployment of US armed forces necessary to counter the terrorist threat to the USA,” Mr Bush wrote in a letter to congressional leaders. “As I have stated previously, it is likely that the American campaign against terrorism will be lengthy,” he said.

In his remarks to reporters, with German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder at his side, Mr Bush said the international coalition he had formed following the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington would be “patient.”

“The terrorists of the world will understand that I’m determined ... to bring them to justice,” Mr Bush said. “If it takes one day, one month, one year or one decade, we’re patient enough, because we understand that the actions we take together are not only important for today but will say to future chancellors, our future presidents, ‘Here’s how we fight terrorism’.”

He praised Mr Gerhard Schroeder’s support since September 11 strikes on the USA, saying that he had “no more steadfast friend” in the global war on terrorism.

“I’m proud to have him here,” Mr Bush said. The German leader said the meeting showed that “in these difficult times friendship must prevail and does prevail” and expressed Germany’s “deepest solidarity” in word and deed with the USA.

“We very much are in agreement about the fact that this fight against terrorism which we are all involved in by now must be a very comprehensive approach,” with economic and diplomatic fronts as well as military action, said Mr Schroeder.

Mr Schroeder praised Mr Bush for the “fantastic way” he ordered food and medicine drops for displaced Afghans even as military strikes pounded Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers and reiterated the message often heard from the White House that military action targets the suspected terror mastermind, not all Muslims. AFP, DPA

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Laden tops US list of terrorists

Washington, October 10
The White House today released a list of 22 “most wanted terrorists,” including Islamic militant Osama bin Laden and others indicted in connection with five major incidents in the 1980s and 1990s.

The list highlights a new joint effort by the FBI and State Department to capture the suspects, which is backed by a $ 5 million reward for useful information.

They are wanted in connection with the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847 in Beirut, the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, a 1995 plot to bomb jumbo jets in the Far East, the 1996 Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia and the 1998 bombings of the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

Bin Laden, suspected of masterminding the September 11 attacks on the USA, is on the list due to his indictment in connection with the embassy bombings. Reuters

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USA slams Sudan for bombings, still wants its help

Washington, October 10
The USA which has recruited Sudan for its coalition against international terrorism, has blamed the African country’s government for the “senseless” bombing of UN food operations. But State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said this would not stop Washington from seeking help from Sudan for its fight against Osama bin Laden, who lived in the African country from 1991 to 1996 but is now believed to be based in Afghanistan.

Though the USA has accused Khartoum of carrying out such attacks in the past, the bombings on Friday, Saturday and Monday were the first reported since hijackers crashed planes into landmarks in New York and Washington on September 11.

On Monday the UN World Food Programme said two days of bombing had disrupted relief food distribution to about 20,000 people in the village of Mangayath in Raga province.

Vancouver: Canadian troops will join forces in a few days in the United States-led reprisals against Osama bin Laden and the Taliban government in Afghanistan.

The deployment of warships, aircraft and 2,000 troops, including a special anti-terrorism unit, amounts to a contribution similar to what this country made during the Gulf War. Although the length of Canada’s deployment is uncertain, officials have said it would initially be for six months.

Rabat: Morocco’s King Mohammed VI has issued instructions to dispatch emergency humanitarian assistance to the Afghan population displaced in Pakistan and border areas, following recent developments and launching of US-British action in Afghanistan. Reuters, UNI, MAP
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UN sanctions on 11 Laden organisations

United Nations, October 10
The United Nations has ordered member states to freeze the funds and assets of 27 organisations, individuals and firms linked to suspected terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden.

The USA on September 24 also ordered the funds frozen for the same 11 organisations, 13 individuals and three firms.

Al-Qaida, which the USA says is run by Bin Laden, topped the list of terrorist organisations placed under sanctions on Saturday. The list was made public yesterday.

The Bush administration says that Bin Laden and Al-Qaida carried out the September 11 attacks that demolished the World Trade Center and damaged the Pentagon.

The Security Council Sanctions Committee for Afghanistan ordered states to freeze the assets of 13 individuals and three companies in addition to the 11 terror groups.

The Bin Laden-linked groups placed under sanction include the Abu Sayyaf of the Philippines, the Armed Islamic Group of Algeria and the Harakat ul-Mujahidin of Kashmir.

Also listed were the Egyptian Islamic Movement and the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, Asbat Al-Ansar, Salafist Group for Call and Combat, Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, Al-Itihaad Al-Islamiya (AIAI), the Islamic Army of Aden.

Individuals placed under sanctions included Shaykh Saiid, who was in Bin Laden’s financial affairs in Sudan and Abu Hafs, the Mauritanian, believed to be a key lieutenant of Bin Laden. AP

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Afghan Shoora in offing

Islamabad, October 10
The stage appears to be set to form a 20-member joint council of Afghan representatives once the Taliban Government collapses under the weight of the ongoing attacks by the United States and its allies, reports said.

The Northern Alliance and deposed King Zahir Shah will nominate 30 members each to the new Shoora by month-end.

The News quoted highly placed sources as saying that out of 60 nominated persons, 20 would be selected through a scrutiny process keeping in mind their links with Afghan tribes and different Mujahideen organisations.

The proposed Afghan council is said to have full blessings of the USA while Pakistan is understood to have accepted it with a pinch of salt, the reports said and quoted a diplomat as saying: “For Pakistan, the dilemma is like heads they win, tails we lose.”

Recently a representative delegation of the Northern Alliance headed by its Foreign Minister held a meeting with former King Zahir Shah in Rome after a US congressional delegation held talks with him to work out details of the future Afghan set-up. Pakistan has also extended an invitation to Zahir Shah to visit Islamabad after special emissary of the monarch held talks with the Foreign Office here a week ago, the News said.

Pakistan has long been opposed to any role of the Northern Alliance in any future set-up and has been supporting the Taliban after being the first country to grant recognition to their government. UNI

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Afghans stone Pak, French scribes

Peshawar, October 10
Detained French journalist Michel Peyrard and two Pakistani colleagues were displayed on the streets of a Taliban-held city and stoned by angry residents, a Taliban source said today. The source with the Taliban’s official Bakhtar news agency said Peyrard and Pakistani journalists Mohammad Irfan and Mukkaram Khan were pelted with rocks as they were displayed to the public in the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad.

He said they were made to wear burqas, the compulsory head-to-toe veil for women which Peyrard was allegedly wearing as a disguise when he was arrested yesterday on suspicion of spying.

“They were taken to Jalalabad and displayed wearing burqas. People were hitting them with stones and demanded that they be handed over to the people for punishment,” the Taliban official said. The three were arrested for allegedly entering the country illegally and Taliban officials said that Peyrard was suspected of spying, a crime punishable by death. AFP

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Anti-US protests rock Jakarta

Jakarta, October 10
As Jakarta was rocked today by another day of anti-US demonstrations, the Indonesian police fired teargas on crowds of student protesters in front on parliament building and arrested six others near the American Embassy.

The six arrested university students were die-hard members of more than 1,000 protesters who gathered outside the embassy today for the third day to shout anti-American slogans for the US air and missile bombing of Afghanistan in retaliation for the September 11 terrorist attack in New York and Washington. DPA

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White House rejects Al-Qaida message

Washington, October 10
The White House said a statement from the Al-Qaida network run by Osama bin Laden, whom Washington blames for September 11 terror strikes, did nothing but bolster its view that the group must be eradicated.

“If anybody needed further proof that this group of terrorists has launched attacks on freedom and civilisation, all they had to do was watch that statement,” said a White House official yesterday who declined to be named.

Earlier, Al-Qaida spokesman Suleiman Abu Ghaith warned in a pre-recorded message broadcast by Qatar-based Al-Jazeera satellite television station that “the Americans must know that the storm of airplanes will not stop.” AFP

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Alliance wrests key city

Dushanbe, October 10
Northern Alliance troops have captured the strategically important city of Panjkaria in Samangan province, said Muhitdin Mekhti, adviser to the Ambassador of the Islamic State of Afghanistan in Tajikistan today.

In an interview with Novosti Mr Mekhti said Panjkaria was only 7 km from the province’s major city of Aibak.

The Taliban troops’ morale has got a beating after Taliban Minister of Aviation Akhtar Muhammad Mansur was killed in the US airstrikes, and desertion cases became more frequent, he said. UNI

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Pro-Taliban Quetta DIG removed

Islamabad, October 10
A key police official in Pakistan’s Quetta town has been removed following his failure to curb violent anti-US rallies allegedly due to his pro-Taliban leanings.

Quetta police chief Haji Habibur Rehman is accused of not arresting 18 persons, who were behind the riots and demonstrations. PTI

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Khaleda Zia sworn in PM

Dhaka, October 10
Begum Khaleda Zia was sworn in today as Bangladesh’s Prime Minister. President Shahabuddin Ahmed administered the oath of office to Ms Khaleda in a ceremony at the Presidential palace.

Ms Khaleda was swept to power in the October 1 general election which outgoing Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina alleged had been rigged.

Ms Khaleda’s Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) and its allies won more than two-thirds of Parliament’s 300 seats against 62 by Hasina’s Bangladesh Awami League. Reuters

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Nobel winners work as a team

Boulder, Colorado, October 10
They are a team, whether working in a laboratory on a project that will rewrite science books or finishing each other’s sentences at a news conference after winning a share of the Nobel Prize for Physics.

Carl Wieman, 50, is shy and soft-spoken, while Eric Cornell, 39, flashes a quick smile and is always ready with a quip. And while Cornell had already lined up a baby sitter for his two children so he could celebrate the honour, Wieman had the press conference moved up 15 minutes so he would be on time for his passion, teaching a university class called ‘‘ Physics for the non-scientist.’’

Eric A. Cornell, Wolfgang Ketterle and Carl E. Wieman were jointly awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in physics yesterday.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm cited the three laureates ‘‘for their achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates’’.

Cornell and Wieman along with Germany’s Wolfgang Ketterle, 43, won the prestigious $1 million prize for creating a form of matter, something Albert Einstein predicted in the 1920s. ‘‘We know each other very well,’’ Ketterle said of his co-winners. ‘‘We have been racing and hunting for this new matter.’’

Cornell from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, and Wieman, of the University of Colorado, created in 1995 the coldest place in the Universe by building an ‘‘atom trap’’ with magnetic fields to skim off hot atoms, hugely magnifying the natural way a cup of coffee cools.

CAMBRIDGE: The third Nobel prize winner, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Professor Wolfgang Ketterle said he was stunned to win the nobel prize in Physics with two others scientists, saying their creation of a new state of matter was a great moment for Atomic Physics. ‘‘We know each other very well,’’ Ketterle yesterday said of his co-winners, ‘‘We have been racing and hunting for this new matter.’’ ‘‘You never expect it,’’ Ketterle said of the prize. Ketterle is a German citizen who came to the MIT in 1990 as a postdoctoral fellow.

Since their 1995 discovery of Bose-Einstein condensate , more than 2,000 scientific research papers by other physicists have appeared. The speed with which the three scientists were awarded the nobel prize reflected the ‘‘breadth of this discovery,’’ Ketterle said. Reuters

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