Friday, November 23, 2001, Chandigarh, India





National Capital Region--Delhi

E D I T O R I A L   P A G E


EDITORIALS

BJP’s new stance
H
OME Minister L. K. Advani surprised his secular critics by unambiguously denouncing the VHP (Vishwa Hindu Parishad) for its forced entry into the makeshift structure in Ayodhya on October 17. He went one step ahead. He agreed with the views of journalist Kuldip Nayar that Mahatma Gandhi’s views that the Hindus and the Muslims were the two eyes of the nation were very true even today. This is anti-communalism pure and simple. Some journalists see in this a dramatic shift in Mr Advani’s ideological stance. That is simplistic.

Reviving Afghan relations
I
NDIA'S decision to station in the Afghan capital medical and paramedical personnel and set up a liaison office can be considered a good beginning to reconstruct its Afghan policy, in tatters since September 26, 1996, when the Burhanuddin Rabbani government was ejected by the Pakistan-backed Taliban from Kabul. This is right time New Delhi made its presence felt in an appropriate manner when UN-guided efforts are on to establish a broadbased government in Afghanistan with the India-friendly Northern Alliance poised to play a dominant role.



EARLIER ARTICLES

Denness stumps cricket
November 22
, 2001
Call back the cricketers
November 21
, 2001
PM’s sangat darshan
November 20
, 2001
Politics of POTO
November 19
, 2001
Maharaja Ranjit Singh: Punjab’s benevolent ruler
November 18
, 2001
The Afghan endgame
November 17
, 2001
Doha resurrects WTO
November 16
, 2001
Quieter Divali
November 14
, 2001
Bin Laden’s bluster
November 13
, 2001
India’s major gains
November 12
, 2001
POTO is a must to tackle terrorism 
November 11
, 2001
Severe blow to farmers
November 10
, 2001

 

THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
 

FRANKLY SPEAKING

Hari Jaisingh
Building new strategic ties
Moscow has always stood for a strong India
Moscow: "Shout for us across the Himalayas whenever you need us." This is how Nikita Khrushchev reassured a newly independent India in 1955. We did shout for help of all kinds, and we got them in abundance, though at a price. We continue to shout for help even today and the Russians have never said no.

MIDDLE

Oh Calcutta!
Robin Gupta
T
HERE was a practised knock on the door. We had just checked in at the Great Eastern Hotel, one time the Claridges of Calcutta. Having undertaken an arduous journey and still fragrant with the perfumes of North Bengal’s jungle, I was quelling my exhaustion with deep draughts of Gilbey’s gin with a friend. Reluctantly, I got up to open the door to find a gaudily dressed middle aged lady accompanied by two girls, enter discreetly. We were not surprised. The Great Eastern had that kind of dry, decadent, elevated ambience.

OPEN FORUM


Knee-jerk reaction: let’s grow up
The Sachin hands: is it ball tampering? THE Indian reaction to Mike Denness’s fines is classic desi knee-jerk. There is a process in place. Either we respect it or scrap it. If we do not like the decision, how about asking for a review by the ICC? Your editorial and other such articles only inflame the environment at the expense of the game and spectators. We have to grow up and behave as adults, and do not threaten the future of cricket because our poor feelings have been hurt.
  • Protest with dignity
  • Don’t call them back
  • Is this circus?
  • Discrimination
  • Racism
  • Condemnable

TRENDS & POINTERS

Why a challenge for some is pain for others
A
person’s ability to cope with stress may help doctors predict their risk of heart and vascular diseases, a Finnish study has found. New findings from a study begun over 20 years ago by five Finnish universities showed that a combination of a demanding family environment, dissatisfied parents and a temperament that copes poorly with stress raised the risk of physical illness.

75 YEARS AGO


Storm in Burma

A CENTURY OF NOBELS

1922 Physics: NIELS BOHR


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BJP’s new stance

HOME Minister L. K. Advani surprised his secular critics by unambiguously denouncing the VHP (Vishwa Hindu Parishad) for its forced entry into the makeshift structure in Ayodhya on October 17. He went one step ahead. He agreed with the views of journalist Kuldip Nayar that Mahatma Gandhi’s views that the Hindus and the Muslims were the two eyes of the nation were very true even today. This is anti-communalism pure and simple. Some journalists see in this a dramatic shift in Mr Advani’s ideological stance. That is simplistic. Take the Ayodhya temple. Long time ago, the Supreme Court has banned entry into the makeshift temple and what the VHP leaders, Ashok Singhal and S.C. Dixit, had done is a clear violation of the orders of the apex court. Further, a PIL ( public interest litigation) has been filed in the Supreme Court and the country’s Home Minister cannot ignore these high judiciary matters. This explains his “denunciation” of the VHP and its forced entry. It was simply a question of ministerial responsibility versus ideological calling.

Some commentators have interpreted his statement on Wednesday in the Rajya Sabha as a new-found dovish line which is unwarranted. Mr Advani cannot militate against the well-publicised Supreme Court ruling even if the affected party, the VHP, is a prominent arm of the Sangh Parivar, to which he belongs. The apex court has before it a PIL challenging the entry of the VHP leaders into the makeshift structure. And the Supreme Court has also issued a notice to the Centre and the state government of Uttar Pradesh to remedy the legal infirmity in the order against Mr Advani and others in the Babri Masjid demolition case. This is the background against which Mr Advani’s categorical statement should be viewed. He has not changed his views but the law, rather the legal demand, has forced him to adopt a different line. What it means is that the BJP, both at the Centre and in the state, realises that the Ayodhya issue is no more a vote getting proposition. So the search is for another issue that will fill its vote bank. That is POTO and Mr Advani, a dove on the Ayodhya issue, is becoming increasingly a hawk on this.

More importantly, Mr Advani agreed to the proposition of journalist Kuldip Nayar and by implication that of activist actress Shabana Azmi that (a) the Muslims feel insecure and (b) a nation cannot allow one-sixth of the population’s patriotism being constantly questioned. All three subscribed to the theory of Mahatma Gandhi that the two communities are like the two eyes of a human being. The complaint is well taken but the government’s action does not fully inspire confidence. An occasional call by disgraced BJP chief Bangaru Laxman or a post-script to Mr Advani’s Parliament statement is not likely to remedy the situation.
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Reviving Afghan relations

INDIA'S decision to station in the Afghan capital medical and paramedical personnel and set up a liaison office can be considered a good beginning to reconstruct its Afghan policy, in tatters since September 26, 1996, when the Burhanuddin Rabbani government was ejected by the Pakistan-backed Taliban from Kabul.This is right time New Delhi made its presence felt in an appropriate manner when UN-guided efforts are on to establish a broadbased government in Afghanistan with the India-friendly Northern Alliance poised to play a dominant role. The liaison office was obviously the first requirement before establishing a full-fledged embassy, and it will enable India to rush adequate medicine and food supplies not only to earn goodwill of the war-ravaged and drought-hit people but also to remind them that this country continues to remain their well-wisher because of its traditional bonds. India has already promised to send one million tonnes of foodgrains which may be increased by the time a provisional governing council, as envisaged by the UN and possibly headed by ex-king Zahir Shah, is in place. New Delhi had excellent relations with Kabul during the rule of Zahir Shah, when he was deposed by his nephew Dawood. Circumstances have provided India an opportunity which could never be expected before September 11 when the Taliban rulers were exposed for their alliance with international terrorism. India should play its cards extremely carefully to prevent any threat to its interests in Kabul owing to any Pakistan game plan.

The Vajpayee government should use its influence in the larger grouping that has been created besides the six-plus-two arrangement to gain a major share of the administrative cake for the Northern Alliance to strengthen India's ties with the Rabbani-led faction. This does not mean that the Zahir Shah camp or the non-Taliban Pashtun groups which may be included in the interim administrative arrangement being worked out till democratically elected people's representatives take up the reins of power should be ignored. The former king is well-disposed towards India, but the problem is that he has got a soft corner for Pakistan too, and that is where the rub lies. Contrary to this, the Rabbani-led alliance of minority Uzbeks, Tajiks, Hazaras, etc, has been in constant touch with India even when its control was reduced to less than 10 per cent of Afghanistan after the emergence of the Taliban. Besides India, it trusts Russia and Iran too. It suspects the USA despite having been helped by the super power by bombing the Taliban military bases. Hence the US subtle move to prevent the Alliance from growing into a force capable of threatening its interests at any stage. But the Alliance is the most visible reality today irrespective of how the USA or other western powers look at it. India, however, should not put all its eggs in one basket (the Rabbani group). There is need to cultivate non-Taliban Pashtun forces too so that this major lacuna in our Afghan policy is removed. This is a big challenge before India at the moment, indeed.
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FRANKLY SPEAKING

Building new strategic ties
Moscow has always stood for a strong India
Hari Jaisingh

Moscow: "Shout for us across the Himalayas whenever you need us." This is how Nikita Khrushchev reassured a newly independent India in 1955. We did shout for help of all kinds, and we got them in abundance, though at a price. We continue to shout for help even today and the Russians have never said no.

Indo-Soviet relations have been a unique feature in the history of nations. They laid the foundations for India's economic development at a time when the Western world was opposed to the industrialisation of the newly free countries. Soviet assistance advanced the cause of the country's self-reliance and economic independence. It also supported India's independent foreign policy, though the Americans saw in it a pro-Soviet tilt.

The basic aim of Soviet assistance was to help India develop its industries, above all heavy industries at a time when the private sector was too weak to take up the industrial development of the country.

Thus, from its very inception, Soviet assistance was geared to serve the objectives of India's Five-Year Plans. Soviet credits and the "rupee trade" system overcame the foreign exchange constraints.

One recalls these facts for the benefit of our younger generation which has probably no idea of the significance of Soviet assistance to this country in those critical years half a century ago to build up its economy. As for India's defence, it was almost entirely dependent on Soviet military supplies.

"We don't want a weak India as a friend," Khrushchev once said. I also recall his excitement at a "virtual red revolution" in the mouth after chewing a paan during his visit to Calcutta in 1955 along with Bulganin. I was then a school student in the city of processions which is also dubbed as the city of joy. Those were different days. Indo-Soviet ties then had begun to shape on concrete lines.

Moscow has always wanted a strong India. Which is why it has equipped the Indian armed forces with the latest hardware, though there have often been murmurings about the quality of equipment and spare parts. Russia, however, continues to be the most reliable source of latest arms. What is more, it is ready to transfer military technology to India and create facilities for the joint production of military items in this country. Thus, even today about 70 per cent of the military hardware used by the Indian armed forces are of Soviet or Russian origin.

I have no intention to go into great details. What is important is that Russia continues to be our main supplier of defence equipment. Some of the items are superior to even US arms. For example, SU 31 Kl, the long-range interceptor. Mention must be made here of the Russian offer of a missile defence system, the joint test firing of cruise missile from India and the renovation of Gorshkov, the aircraft carrier. Let us not forget that we have waged three wars successfully with Russian military hardware.

The late eighties and early nineties of the last century were almost wasted years. Russia was in deep distress. Indo-Russian cooperation almost came to a halt. But Russia held. It did not break up as was expected by its detractors.

Indo-Russian cooperation began to pick up from the late nineties. And with President Putin at the helm (he calls himself "the best friend of India in Russia"), it has almost bounced back to normalcy.

One must recall here the Moscow Declaration signed by the two countries in 1994. In the context of what is happening in our neighbourhood, it is of great significance. It sought to protect multi-religious and multi-cultural societies. It also spoke of "their deep interest in promoting peace and stability in the area between the borders of the Republic of India and the Russian Federation." There is a large Russian population in Central Asia. Islamic fundamentalism can threaten their life. As for India, it is keen to protect its integrity from religious and ethnic separatism.

The Moscow Declaration of November, 2001, on international terrorism signed by Prime Minister Vajpayee and President Putin in Moscow this time underlined the need for "decisive measures" against all states which support this scourge by adopting an international law in this regard.

The joint statement issued by the two countries have affirmed their commitment as "strategic partners" to actively cooperate in addressing issues of global and regional security, including threats posed by terrorism and extremism.

Indo-Russian cooperation is largely confined to defence, energy, space and science and technology. In the last few years, defence cooperation between the two countries has grown at an incredible speed. There is a commissioner to oversee this military cooperation.

Cooperation in science and technology, I believe, is the most significant aspect of our relations with Russia, for India can expect little help in this area from the western countries. In any case, the private sector in the advanced countries refuses to cooperate with Indian R&D institutions.

At present there are 150 research projects in which the two countries are engaged. Mention may be made of infotech, communications, power, biotech, medicine and others — in all covering some 17 industrial fields. Russia wants a two-way flow — high tech from Russia and software from India. Russia is in need of a large number of computers for its school programme. The Indo-Russian computer centre was opened in July, 2000. It uses India's super computer.

Russia will be helping in setting up a nuclear power plant at Kundankulam (South India). India has invested in an oil project in the Sakhalin island of Russia. It is proposed to jointly explore the Bay of Bengal for hydrocarbons. The two are working on a north-south transportation corridor. Moscow is also interested in making civilian aircraft for the world market in collaboration with New Delhi.

Economic cooperation has declined with the change in India's economic ideology. The current annual trade turnover is less than $ 2 billion. It does not reflect the "strategic partnership" between the two countries.

Central Asia is an area of neglect. Only, of late, India has devoted attention to this area. And yet it is of vital importance to the country. The Central Asians feel that India is following a policy of "wait and watch". This is unfortunate.

It is true that India cannot take up any official investment in the region except in the energy sector. Even otherwise, it is the job of India's private sector. But the private sector has been hesitant largely because of the risks involved.

Today the two countries are engaged in a major struggle against terrorism. Since both are victims of terrorism, they have set up a joint working group to combat the menace.

The Declaration on Strategic Partnership signed in October, 2000, and the Moscow Declaration of 2001 guide the two countries on new lines. They provide a framework for joint operations in various fields of vital interest to the country. Indeed, the visit of Prime Minister Vajpayee to St. Petersburg and Moscow marks the beginning of a new phase in bilateral ties.

As Russia is getting Euro-centric, the relationship between the two countries will have to be totally recast. They have to be more pragmatic, well-focused and result-oriented. Indeed, Indo-Russian friendship henceforth will be tested not on sentiment but on the touchstone of professionalism and the competitive thrust in today's market economy to mutual advantage. The tunes of Raj Kapoor days would surely continue to haunt the oldtimers in Moscow softly but the new mantra in Indo-Russian relationship will be mainly the quality in cooperation.

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Oh Calcutta!
Robin Gupta

THERE was a practised knock on the door. We had just checked in at the Great Eastern Hotel, one time the Claridges of Calcutta. Having undertaken an arduous journey and still fragrant with the perfumes of North Bengal’s jungle, I was quelling my exhaustion with deep draughts of Gilbey’s gin with a friend. Reluctantly, I got up to open the door to find a gaudily dressed middle aged lady accompanied by two girls, enter discreetly. We were not surprised. The Great Eastern had that kind of dry, decadent, elevated ambience.

The ladies made themselves comfortable without any ceremony, slipped into couches and joined us in our libations. As happens in life when people, however, disparate, drink together walls collapse rapidly; barriers vanish. “What savoury do you suggest with the drink?” I politely enquired. My friend, a military officer, was outlining a stratagem and started gearing up his reflexes. “They all know what we prefer,” said the older woman. The girls were deliberately coy.

The door opened again and trays of chilly chicken and fish tikka were laid out on the coffee table. I never oppose situations. I became a part of their lyrics to participate and to rejoice in moments. It was clear that there was a calligraphic unity between the waiters, the well used furniture, the ladies and their silent gestures. However, our responses had almost diminished, courtesy the countless tumblers of gin.

I discovered that evening that gin is a depressant. We started talking about life. The elder lady told me that she had been sold by her parents and had trained in “Mujra”. She could sing and she could dance. She operated a renowned “kotha” in Sonagachi. When she was in the fullness of youth and travelling in the erstwhile kingdom of Murshidabad, a rich zamindar heard her singing and bought her. She lived happily with him in a palatial mansion by the Ganges. As age advanced she was granted a handsome pension, a house in Calcutta and was “superannuated.”

Thereafter, she set up her own establishment. The two girls were her “wards”. They remained silent mostly, but made polite gestures and now and then looked at me and my friend out of the corner of their eyes. The Madame, however, was full of life’s experience. She did not display any kind of bitterness. She noticed that the military man was fast disintegrating.

I was amazed at her knowledge of classical music. She explained to me the divergence between Shastriya Sangeet in Northern India and in the Punjab region, in particular, in contrast to the “Purab Ang”.

We gave up attempting any physicality, for we had crossed that stage. There may have been the desire, but the ability had left us. So, we talked of many things and exchanged our respective sorrows. One of the younger girls told me that during the Durga Puja, in the previous year, she had once tried to enter a “pandal” to propitiate Goddess Kali. There were tricksters with lit torches between clenched teeth, dancing on the street. There was pious old men, who tried to elbow her. She had to beat a hasty retreat. “Life”, she said, “is an endless theatre, in which we are spectators during the day and can participate only in the night.”

I felt a strange stirring of sorrow. I turned around to the Madame and said, “I will be your brother from now onwards”. She looked at me and said: “I shall tie a Rakhi on you.” We exchanged addresses. She decided to punctuate the moment and tore a strip of cloth from the hem of her petticoat and tied it around my wrist. I do not remember anything beyond this point, for I had succumbed to oblivion.

I woke up early. The sun rises earlier in the East. However, it was dark. I seemed to be reeling out of a nightmare. I looked under my pillow for a kerchief. Our gold chains and wallets were missing. I awakened my friend. He told me to have a large drink. It will part the clouds. “What happened?” I asked. I then saw a strip of cloth around my wrist which awakened me fully. I inhaled the torrential downpour of the monsoon rain, that had just started.

In the street below someone had completed his journey. I could hear a chorus chanting “Hari Bol; Ram Nam Satya Hai. Hari Bol; Ram Nam Satya Hai.”

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OPEN FORUM

Knee-jerk reaction: let’s grow up

THE Indian reaction to Mike Denness’s fines is classic desi knee-jerk. There is a process in place. Either we respect it or scrap it. If we do not like the decision, how about asking for a review by the ICC? Your editorial and other such articles only inflame the environment at the expense of the game and spectators. We have to grow up and behave as adults, and do not threaten the future of cricket because our poor feelings have been hurt.

There does not seem to be a voice of calm or patience, especially when it comes to bashing the Brits. Of course, had it been the Americans, we would have been bending backwards to please them, to put it mildly, even though the Americans are no less racist than the Brits, and monumentally ignorant.

Rajinder Singh, by e-mail

Protest with dignity

It is shocking to know that captain Saurav Ganguly, Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Shiv Sunder Das, Deep Dasgupta and Harbhajan Singh have been wrongly penalised. But we should not be so short-sighted as to withdraw the Indian team from the third Test match to be played on November 23 at Centurion Park, as we have no dispute with the United Cricket Board of South Africa (UCBSA) We should avoid sending any wrong signals to the cricket lovers and the people of South Africa.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) should just replace all the 11 players of the regular Indian team from the third Test match to save our top cricketers from further humiliation and punishment by the highly prejudiced and arrogant Mike Denness. India should instead field a new B-grade team to play against South Africa in the third Test match. BCCI should prevent any further damage being done to the careers of the top Indian cricketers by the now very angry match referee Mike Denness, who is expected to do his worst against the Indian team in the third Test match.

Let the UCBSA deal with the problems of low turnout of spectators, low gate earnings and low advertisement revenue from TV broadcasting rights etc. Let the UCBSA curse Mike Denness for his wrong decisions leading to the huge loss of revenue as well as the loss of prestige that will be caused to it due to the replacement of all our top 11 players with the new ones. BCCI has every right to safeguard the genuine and legitimate interests of all the top players of the Indian Cricket team.

Ashok T. Jaisinghani, Pune

Don’t call them back

Racism is a complicated charge. If you accuse Mike Denness of being a racist, you must also be able to give substantial evidence that Mike treats people of different races differently. A single case of Mike being harsh towards a particular race does not prove anything.

Now that we are in this problem, and we feel that we have been treated unfairly, why not fight it. Let us report to the ICC and demand sacking of Denness for his disproportionate decisions.

Let us make sure that this injustice does not go unnoticed. Let us haul up our contacts in the foreign media and publicise this grave mistake. Let us show the Proteas that such anger inspired in us can be disastrous for their series ambitions.

What is this attitude of "calling our team back" and "requesting the English team to leave"? Is your editorial decision to include England in this controversy only because the English are also white like the South Africans?

AMRINDER ARORA, by e-mail

Is this circus?

Yes, this is how Mike Denis has behaved on the fourth day of second test match between India and South Africa. He acted as a ringmaster with a whip in his hand by suspending and fining innocent Indian players.

Is this not racial indiscrimination when players like Shaun Polock, Micheal Slater and Andrea Nel went scot-free even after seriously misbehaving in the field? The BCCI should strongly take up with the spineless (rightly called by Navjot Sidhu) ICC and Denness should be barred from being referee in any match as it looks he has gone insane.

To my mind, the Indian team should take up this matter with the legal authorities of South Africa on whose land this injustice has been done to them.

SURENDER SYAL, Panchkula

Discrimination

Whenever an Indian cricket team goes abroad, it suffers double humiliation. First, it suffers due to bad performance. Second, it suffers at the hands of bad umpiring and racial discrimination. When an Indian player is playing well, he is given out unjustly, for instance Sachin was given out in a strange and bizarre manner - shoulder before wickets.

And now at Port Elizabeth South Africa in the second cricket test Shiv Sunder Das was given out L.B.W. when the ball has clearly nicked his bat. Laxman was given out L.B.W when the ball was clearly going down the leg side.

On both occasions bowler Shaun Pollock made a prolonged and theatrical appeals. As a result the empire buckled under pressure and gave the wrong decisions.

But when the Indian players appealed loudly, they were penalised heavily by Mike Denness. Why was Pollock not punished?

Earlier in the series against the Aussies, the player from the host country Maccgrath was spared by the match referee but Venkatesh Prasad was punished for the same act. Later on Michael Slater was spared by the match referee when the Aussies toured India. It smacks of racial discrimination.

Indian players like Mohinder Amarnath had to suffer racial comments at the hands of Aussies.

The ICC must do something so that Indians should not feel hurt and let down. Something must be done to stop the sledging.

KANWAR YADVINDER SINGH, Ludhiana

Racism

Cricket is a game of the white men, for the white men and by the white men. The white men have neither come out of their colonial mindset nor from their racist or fascist thinking. The ICC is governed by conspirators, racists, fascists, clowns and lunatics. The white men in the ICC are full of bias against the coloured people. The ICC rules are twisted at will to harass only the browns and blacks. A white man is allowed to walk away scot-free even if he seriously violates any of the rules of the ICC.

The Indian team, if they have any self-respect, should walk out of the South African tour. BCCI President Jagmohan Dalmiya should not make our players scapegoats in his efforts to globalise cricket. The BCCI is a toothless body of jokers. Indian Sports Minister Uma Bharati has little knowledge of sports and knows only how to break the places of worship of minorities like the Babri Masjit. It is futile to expect any support from the BCCI and the Indian government.

SYED TANVEERUDDIN, Mysore

Condemnable

I strongly object to the decision imposed by the match referee against the six players of the Indian cricket team, including master blaster Sachin Tendulkar.

The incident is highly condemnable as this highly biased, one sided and overlooks many episodes that happened in this very match and many earlier matches. Why is India being victimised.

PANKAJ AHUJA, Jalandhar
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Why a challenge for some is pain for others

A person’s ability to cope with stress may help doctors predict their risk of heart and vascular diseases, a Finnish study has found.

New findings from a study begun over 20 years ago by five Finnish universities showed that a combination of a demanding family environment, dissatisfied parents and a temperament that copes poorly with stress raised the risk of physical illness.

The study of 3,600 people linking physical and psychological factors to heart and vascular diseases, is the longest of its kind, said Liisa keltikangas-Jarvinen, professor of psychology at the University of Helsinki.

“A person’s temperament determines what he considers stress and how he reacts or what kinds of physical reactions emerge during stress,” keltikangas-Jarvinen told a news conference.

While stress had been considered a factor in the illness for a long time, the concept of stress had been vague, she said.

“Temperament has not earlier been seen as a risk factor (of heart and vascular diseases),” keltikangas-Jarvinen said.

Innate temperament, or the way people deal with situations, also explained why the same things were a challenge for some and a pain for others, and why in the same stressful situation some people got ill but others grew stronger.

“One cannot say what kind of stress is physiologically dangerous for people. It is how they feel the stress which determines whether they will get ill or not,” she said.

An easily stressed person who was brought up in a stress-causing environment had an increased risk of falling ill with heart and vascular diseases, keltikangas-Jarvinen said.

One risk factor was a family environment where the child did not get emotional support, where he or she was not accepted, and where goals set for the child were extremely high.

Further risks were parents who were not satisfied with their lives — such as career-oriented mothers who had cold and distant relationships with their children — and who compensated for this dissatisfaction by working hard, she said.

There were also differences between the sexes on what kind of temperament types were risky and what were not.

Women who were dependent on social support did well but men who needed positive feedback were unable to see the physical warning signs their bodies were sending them during stress and faced a greater risk of heart disease.

Perfectionism was a risk factor for women but was not a problem for men, the study found. Reuters
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Storm in Burma

Rangoon
Another breach has occurred on the main line to Mandalay above Yamethin. Transshipment is not impossible. It is not known when thorough running will be resumed. The Southern Shan States Railway is also breached in several places. The Postmaster General, Burma, intimates that a severe storm which struck the Aracan coast on Saturday, wrecked the main Indo-Burma Telegraph lines in several places above and below Taungup. On Monday floods which breached the Railway line above Yamethin, also washed away several posts on the main telegraph line, thus interrupting the second route to India. The breakdown was repaired the same evening and the Aracan route still remains interrupted as the transport of labour and material over difficult countries takes time.

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A CENTURY OF NOBELS

 
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