The Tribune Spectrum
Sunday, November 25, 2001


ART & LITERATURE
'ART AND SOUL
BOOKS
MUSINGS
TIME OFF
YOUR OPTION
ENTERTAINMENT
BOLLYWOOD BHELPURI
TELEVISION
WIDE ANGLE
FITNESS
GARDEN LIFE
NATURE
SUGAR 'N' SPICE
CONSUMER ALERT
TRAVEL
INTERACTIVE FEATURES
CAPTION CONTEST
FEEDBACK


Of glitter, glamour, market economy and communism
Hari Jaisingh

Moscow

WHEN I came here first in the early eighties, it was the heyday of communism. Brezhnev was at the helm. He was no Stalin. But the prying eyes of the dreaded KGB were everywhere — virtually under every bed. Russia was still a super power. But communism was changing slowly but surely. The regime by then had become less harsh, but less efficient too. Perhaps, gone were the days of total fear. And without fear, corruption entered the soul of the system. Thereafter the process of decline became rapid.

Week Specials

The great unsavoury story
A
MERICA is no longer what it was. Till yesterday, it was the mightiest power of the world. Its people were a proud lot. Today, there is gloom everywhere. It is as if the country is in the midst of mourning, in a state of paralysis.

ARCHIVED TRIBUNE SPECIAL
MAHARAJA RANJIT SINGH: SPECIAL FEATURES & PHOTOS
 

Olympians relive the peaks and the troughs
by Ravi Dhaliwal
T
HE erudite hockey Olympian, Rupa Saini belongs to a Faridkot-based family which has a rich tradition in sports, particularly in Indian hockey. At one time, the Saini sisters dominated women's hockey in India and this can be gauged from the fact that three of them— Rupa, Krishna and Prema- turned out for the country in a Test series against Japan in 1970.

Too many cooks spoiling the sports broth
by M.S.Unnikrishnan
T
HERE are too many cooks spoiling the sports broth, and the Sports Ministry is just one of them. Yet, the existence of the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports cannot be wished away as the Sports Ministry plays a prominent role in the growth of sports in the country. A conscientious sports minister can indeed elevate the standard of sports in the country.

Early burnouts the bane of Indian sports
T
HE country has lost many promising youngsters to sport-related injuries and may lose some more in the future with sports medicine being a low priority field in the present hierachy and sportsmen simply being denied the required sports accessories to prevent injuries or proper rehabilitation facilities.

Made for each other, Milkha leads the way
F
LYING Sikh Milkha Singh has so many firsts to his credit. Not only did he excel in track events but has been a trendsetter in other areas too, he was the first Indian athlete to get the Padam Shri in 1959.

Treasurehouse dedicated to the Koran
by K.R.N. Swamy
W
ITH the sacred month of Ramadan, the Holy Koran takes on a new meaning for Muslims all over the world — from Spain to China and from Uzbekistan to Indonesia. But it is only in the tiny island state of Bahrain (area 669 sq km and population 6.29 lakh) that we find a museum, rather a shrine, dedicated to collection of Korans from early 8th century A.D. to modern digital times.

Reliving the tragedy of Mirpur
by Sansar Chandra
I
T was November 25, 1947, when I was driven out from my home town — Mirpur, district headquarters of J&K state — after it was attacked and captured by Pakistan.

HOLLYWOOD HUES
Film that symbolises meeting of two great minds
by Ervell E. Menezes
F
IRST it was E.T. the extra-terrestrial now it is A.I. Artificial Intelligence. Steven Spielberg has unusual ways of naming his films. But his latest effort is a combined effort with his guru Stanley Kubrick whose concept it was. Since Kubrick died before he could do it, Spielberg did it for him.

Exploring small screen’s potential
by Nutan Sehgal
A
LMOST three decades after retiring as one of Bollywood’s most durable lead stars, Asha Parekh is making waves on TV. after ctitically acclaimed serials like Jyoti, Palaash Ke Phool and Baaje Payal, she produced a classy comedy, Daal Mein Kaala, a highly popular tear-jerker Kora Kagaz and is now Kangan which is all set to break a few records in the viewership ratings.

Indian sportsmen swear by non-veg food
by Jangveer Singh
O
UR country may profess vegeterianism, but that is not true of our sportsmen. They cannot have enough of non-vegetarian food, which they feel is the only diet that can take them ahead in their chosen sports.

Do men & women shop differently?
by Mohinder Singh
M
EN and women differ in just about every other way, so why shouldn’t they shop differently? The conventional wisdom on male shoppers is they don’t especially like to do it, which is why they don’t do much of it. It’s a struggle to get them to be patient company for a woman when she shops — often he stands outside and watches girls.

  Week Specials
 

TELEVISIONWillingly suspend your credibility for this one
by Mukesh Khosla

WHAT'S COOKING: Pasta pizzaz!
by Geetu

 

NATURE: They are the creatures of the caves
by Nutan Shukla

LIFE TIESNot all can be achievers
by Taru Bahl

DREAM THEME: Dreaming of togetherness
by Vinaya Katoch Manhas

SUNDAY ACTIVITY: Pack a punch into your picnic
by Chetna Banerjee

VIP TOON TALES: Dalai Lama
by
Ranga

BRIDGE: Sometimes, it pays to break the rules
by Omar Sharif

FEEDBACK: The magnificent Maharaja

Book Reviews

WRITE VIEW
Israel’s lost tribes, Jesus and India
Review by Randeep Wadehra

Sound of music
Review by Kavita Chauhan

Forgotten comedians in classic mould remembered
Review by Philip French

When faith collides with belief
Review by Kuldip Kalia

OFF THE SHELF
Pre-47 Panipat revisited
Review by V. N. Datta

Dying with dignity
Review by Shelley Walia

PUNJABI LITERATURE
Krishna and his role in social change
Review by Jaspal Singh

Home
Top