Monday, November 26, 2001, Chandigarh, India




E D I T O R I A L   P A G E


EDITORIALS

Quickfix history
H
ISTORY changes every time the government changes in New Delhi. So it has this month when the Ministry of Human Resource Development (HRD) ordered the NCERT, and through it the CBSE, to do some changes in four high school textbooks written by eminent academicians. The deletions, a few words here and a few lines there, reorient the text on ancient and medieval ages to the long-held views of the RSS.

Nepal towards instability?
T
HE days of the Sher Bahadur Deuba ministry in Nepal seem to be numbered with Maoist rebels killing 38 police and army personnel in a country-wide attack on the governmental authority on Saturday. In complete disregard for a four-month-old ceasefire agreement reached with the government, the Maoists have captured Dang and Syangia districts and set up a 37-member “United Revolutionary People’s Council” to run their administration.


EARLIER ARTICLES

War against terror: The public opinion conundrum
November 25
, 2001
What has Dalmiya done?
November 24
, 2001
BJP’s new stance
November 23
, 2001
Denness stumps cricket
November 22
, 2001
Call back the cricketers
November 21
, 2001
PM’s sangat darshan
November 20
, 2001
Politics of POTO
November 19
, 2001
Maharaja Ranjit Singh: Punjab’s benevolent ruler
November 18
, 2001
The Afghan endgame
November 17
, 2001
Doha resurrects WTO
November 16
, 2001

National Capital Region--Delhi

THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
OPINION

Significance of NAM today
How to make it effective in changed circumstances

A. N. Dar
N
AM (Non-Aligned Movement) almost died recently. The new government of Bangladesh which was to host the next summit of the movement in Dhaka decided that it would not do so. It made out that NAM was dead and it would not be worthwhile for it to hold its funeral. India, one of the founding fathers of the movement when the idea of non-aligned states coming together originated when Jawaharlal Nehru, Gamal Abdul Nasser of Egypt and President Broz Tito of Yugoslavia met in 1956 in the Adriatic resort of Brioni in Yugoslavia, and said that it would in that case host the summit to be held early next year.

MIDDLE

Yes men, silent consenters and passive dissenters
V. K. Kapoor
S
IDING with authority and betraying others for personal gain has a long tradition. It is both timeless and timely. The world is neither flat nor round, but crooked. Sunflowers always turn to the rising sun. For a successful long innings in corridors of power what is required is a little oiliness, an infinite capacity for simulation and double talk and a facade of altruism. People in authority are surrounded by three types of men-Yes Men, Silent Consenters and Passive Dissenters. These people are not amenable to being exiled from power and influence.

POINT OF LAW

Anupam Gupta
Today’s POTO and its foreign and Indian roots
A
FTER almost a month of aggressive campaigning for POTO or the Prevention of Terrorism Ordinance, 2001, a reluctant BJP climbed down last week under pressure of its allies in the NDA. A two-paragraph resolution passed by the coalition partners on November 19 at their meeting at the Prime Minister’s residence threw the entire campaign virtually out of gear.

TRENDS & POINTERS

Departmental stores mushroom in Delhi despite recession
T
HERE is no stopping the mushrooming of super-markets and departmental stores in Delhi. Most trade gurus feel that there is a conscious shift of consumers from the unorganised to the organised retail market.

  • Food stalls attract visitors at trade fair

A CENTURY OF NOBELS

1925 Literature: George Bernard Shaw

SPIRITUAL NUGGETS



Top





 

Quickfix history

HISTORY changes every time the government changes in New Delhi. So it has this month when the Ministry of Human Resource Development (HRD) ordered the NCERT, and through it the CBSE, to do some changes in four high school textbooks written by eminent academicians. The deletions, a few words here and a few lines there, reorient the text on ancient and medieval ages to the long-held views of the RSS. It believes that there was an unidentified period in India which was a golden age, when there was justice for everyone, when nobody starved and, again nobody ate beef.

There are several misconceptions in this and one deliberate attempt to show Muslims in bad light. Ancient and medieval India went through a harsh time with the caste system and Brahmin-ordered rituals where the ruling class secured divine blessing and the lower ones slaved for days together without the right to witness the proceedings, much less participate in them. The second flaw in this thinking is that beef eating is totally alien to Indian culture and that beef is cow’s meat. It is reasonable to assume that the pastoral society of those days sacrificed its precious asset — cattle wealth. There is also a confusion in the mind of the NCERT that beef is exclusively cow’s meat and like a later-day Go Raksha Samiti, it wants to erase any memory of eating its meat. In India today and India of ancient times animal sacrifice should have been of the male of the species. India as we know today did not exist anytime in the ancient or medieval times; there were kingdoms, big and small, presided over by minor and malicious dictators and following their own faith (pankti). To invent a pan-Indian culture of pure Hinduism is a fantasy.

Obviously, the BJP has forged a brand new issue to fight the coming Assembly elections in UP and Uttaranchal. Now that the Ayodhya issue has ceased to be a vote-getter and POTO about to explode on its face, it has given itself a new emotional issue by raking up the beef-eating past. These history textbooks have been in use for more than 20 years and there is no evidence that young men have taken to beef eating or that they have lost respect for Indian culture. For a variety of reasons, including the once dominant influence of Jainism, a good section of the population remains vegetarian. The NCERT’s sudden action is suspect for two reasons. It has not disclosed who objected to these passages or whom it consulted before ordering the deletions. What is evident is that high school education is being turned into a football in the electoral court.
Top

 

Nepal towards instability?

THE days of the Sher Bahadur Deuba ministry in Nepal seem to be numbered with Maoist rebels killing 38 police and army personnel in a country-wide attack on the governmental authority on Saturday. In complete disregard for a four-month-old ceasefire agreement reached with the government, the Maoists have captured Dang and Syangia districts and set up a 37-member “United Revolutionary People’s Council” to run their administration. Even otherwise, Maoists have been known to be running a parallel government in 40 of Nepal’s 75 districts. Thus, insurgents are back to their violent tactics, and the situation may take a turn for the worse. This is a clear civil war-like condition, an alarming development for India in view of the ISI’s use of the Nepali route to foment trouble in this country. The failure to control insurgency was the main factor behind the replacement of the K. P. Bhattarai ministry by the one led by Mr G. P. Koirala, who too had to go because of this problem. If Mr Deuba is unable to crush the insurgents or bring them back to the negotiating table with the help of other political forces, he may find it difficult to save his position. He will have a lot of explaining to do with regard to last week’s failed talks with the Maoists which, instead of generating hope for an end to insurgency, strengthened the rebels’ belief that they could not achieve their primary objective——-abolition of the institution of constitutional monarchy——through peaceful means. The question raised by the Maoists is very difficult to answer, no doubt, as no political party is prepared for such a course. However, what might be coming in the way of the no-changers is the mindset nurtured for years. But the truth is that monarchy has ceased to be a popular institution in the Himalayan country. The masses expressed little revulsion at the chilling developments in the palace leading to the death of King Birendra, Queen Aishwarya and others in June this year. The time has, therefore, come to give a serious thought to the system of monarchy if this really helps restore peace in Nepal. Moreover, how can one think of the Maoists taking interest in talks when the government gives the impression that their main demand is non-negotiable?

The resurfacing of insurgency in such a ferocious way has put a big question mark over the fate of the SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) summit scheduled to be held in Kathmandu next January. It may not be possible for the Nepalese Congress government to make foolproof security arrangements for SAARC leaders when insurgents are calling the shots in over 50 per cent of the territory, with their influence increasing with the passage of time. The government has expressed the resolve to tame the Maoists by declaring them as “terrorists”, taking advantage of the atmosphere of hatred against terrorism at the global level today. This is not so easy when the insurgents have grown powerful enough to challenge the might of the government. How far the Maoists’ writ exactly runs in the Himalayan kingdom will be demonstrated on December 7 when they have given a call for a country-wide bandh. The Deuba government faces a formidable challenge indeed.
Top

 

Significance of NAM today
How to make it effective in changed circumstances
A. N. Dar

NAM (Non-Aligned Movement) almost died recently. The new government of Bangladesh which was to host the next summit of the movement in Dhaka decided that it would not do so. It made out that NAM was dead and it would not be worthwhile for it to hold its funeral. India, one of the founding fathers of the movement when the idea of non-aligned states coming together originated when Jawaharlal Nehru, Gamal Abdul Nasser of Egypt and President Broz Tito of Yugoslavia met in 1956 in the Adriatic resort of Brioni in Yugoslavia, and said that it would in that case host the summit to be held early next year. But before India got to work on it so that the non-aligned movement did not go abegging for a country where to meet, Jordan offered to take on the task. The offer was gratefully accepted by the Foreign Ministers of the non-aligned countries who met recently in New York.

It was somewhat surprising for Bangladesh’s new government to walk out of the commitment to host the summit which had been made when the last summit was held in South Africa. In the statement it made on the occasion to give up the idea of hosting the summit it seemed to feel that it would not get anything out of it. This highlighted the lessening of the importance of the non-aligned movement. Time was when there would be a queue of countries wanting to host the summit. It lent so much prestige and the chance of becoming so to speak the president and spokesman of the movement for the three years in between two summits. But now quite plainly NAM has lost that old importance and many countries perhaps feel like Bangladesh did that why it should make such a big effort to host the summit that would bring to its capital nearly 120 presidents and prime ministers of as many countries. Quite plainly and perhaps understandably it provided little compensation.

Holding the NAM summit was once considered a great opportunity. It called for a big security management as some of the world’s most controversial leaders like Mr Castro, Mr Arafat and Mr Gaddafi came together to discuss world issues. It was bold of India, as also now of Jordan, to offer to hold the next summit. It would mean such a great demand on energy and expense. But when Jordan graciously made the offer, India agreed to allow it to play host. Jordan had a greater claim to it because it had never played host to the non-aligned summit. Among Arab countries Algeria, Egypt and Iraq had done so. The summit would be a major landmark in the reign of the new monarch of Jordan who would have to receive heads of many countries and governments.

Many believe — and not too erroneously — that NAM has lost its importance after the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union. The world is now reduced to the machinations of a single super power. When the idea of setting up the non-aligned movement was floated in 1956 by the three founders of the movement, the idea was that various countries should be able to withstand the influence of the two super powers fighting each other in the Cold War. They wanted to be neither under the influence of the western bloc nor the eastern bloc. They would judge issues independently and give out their views on their own. If they could do so, they would display their political independence on crucial world issues on which the two super powers demanded their support. This was not always easy. The Non-Aligned Movement enabled them to try to remain independent. While standing together it did not mean that they formulated a common policy. All they had to do was to take their own decisions.

This stance stood them well. It enabled them not to be sucked into either bloc. Because they were now part of a movement, the two blocs could not pressurise them too much. The yardstick was that a non-aligned country should not be a part of an alliance, much less a military alliance, of any bloc. It was because of this that Pakistan, which was a member of the Baghdad Pact, could not become a non-aligned country. Similarly, France or Germany, which were part of NATO, could not be considered non-aligned. The case was similar with say Poland or East Germany which were part of the eastern bloc. They all had to stand out.

As the movement took shape, with the first non-aligned summit which took place in 1961 in Belgrade, the participants included 25 countries like India, Ghana, Egypt, Yugoslavia, Afghanistan and Burma (which later left the movement). It was an appealing idea to be non-aligned between the eastern and western blocs. Summit after summit the number of the non-aligned went on increasing, so much so that at the last summit in South Africa the number had well crossed 100. And more countries wanted to join. As African countries threw out the yoke of colonialism almost all of them said that they were non-aligned.

The growing number of the non-aligned became a big world force. Many countries like Saudi Arabia, which were close to the western bloc, also joined the non-aligned club. So also countries like Cuba, close to the eastern bloc. The rush was so strong that new membership rules were formed. Many countries on the sidelines of non-alignment came in as “guests” and “observers”.

The movement wisely refused to convert itself into an alliance or call itself a bloc. It felt that if it became an alliance, it would turn to a group like the eastern or western bloc. All that it called itself loosely was “non-aligned club”. For the same reason it steadfastly refused to have its headquarters in any country. That was wise because this did not give undue importance to any single country. It did not even have a permanent secretariat. The issue of forming a secretariat came up at every summit but was passed over. All that it conceded was that the country where the summit was held should look after the running affairs of the non-aligned for three years till the next summit.

While the movement remained so, its critics scoffed at it because they said this movement had no teeth. They said that it was not able to pursue the resolutions it adopted. It was only a debating society, something that is also said in derision of the United Nations. Its resolutions were only mandatory. It had no way of implementing them. Another very big weakness was that the economic development of the non-aligned countries was almost at the same level. This placed a limit on their economic cooperation. They remained dependent on the developed world, the North, which in fact called the tune in giving economic aid. The shouts of the non-aligned that they wanted trade and not aid almost fell on deaf ears.

The crux came with the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, with the world now only having a single super power. The non-aligned came upon the fact that they had lost their power to influence the thinking of the big powers. Many countries called for the end of the Non-Aligned Movement. If alignment has ended, they argued, should not non-alignment end too? This argument continues to be heard.

When NAM meets in Jordan the big question that will confront it would be what should it be doing to make itself more relevant. One of the facts that it will discover will be that the only thing wrong with it is its name — Non-Aligned Movement. You cannot be non-aligned when there are no blocs. But the countries which still form part of the Non-Aligned Movement can have a role to play. They can become the conscience keepers of the developing half of the world and bring all of them together to demand a better economic order. It can become a forum against the domination by the economically and militarily stronger countries. It can become a platform for disarmament and end of the nuclear danger. It must spread the message against terrorism and religious fundamentalism. In this it will receive widespread support from the developed world which has just seen what havoc terrorism can play.

The non-aligned, if they want to work for an equitable world order for peace and disarmament, can still have an important role to play. In Jordan it can give a new direction to the movement which does not now have to stress the old theme song of non-alignment.

Top

 

Yes men, silent consenters and passive dissenters
V.K. Kapoor

SIDING with authority and betraying others for personal gain has a long tradition. It is both timeless and timely. The world is neither flat nor round, but crooked. Sunflowers always turn to the rising sun. For a successful long innings in corridors of power what is required is a little oiliness, an infinite capacity for simulation and double talk and a facade of altruism. People in authority are surrounded by three types of men-Yes Men, Silent Consenters and Passive Dissenters. These people are not amenable to being exiled from power and influence. They make their principles plain-they do not have any and that itself is a matter of principle. They are free from the daily tug of war with scruples. The past illuminates the future, the world has always been the same.

Yes men believe in self advancement. They can play up, down and side ways. To get ahead of their fellowmen, they make their virtues known and conceal their vices so that they are acclaimed good, just and strong. They watch their enemies so that they do not prosper and keep an eye on their friends so that their loyalties do not waver. They like to know the weaknesses and strengths and even the innermost secrets of those that work for or against them. They keep their opponents divided and their adherents even more so. For them life is a one big performing art. They appeal to their bosses at a subliminal level. A senior bureaucrat, before a meeting, cleaned the already clean chair of his boss with his handkerchief before the boss sat on the chair. Everybody noticed it. Netajee gave an appreciative nod, the Babu beamed. When there was a chorus of corruption charges about him, Netajee defended him “Bechara sharif aadmi hai. Kursi pe kaho, kursi pe, zamin pe kaho, zamin pe baith jata hain. Char paisa bana liya to kya hua, mehngai ka zamana hai" (A good fellow who does not mind sitting on the floor or the chairs as told. If he has made some money it is okay. Times are so expensive).

Silent consenters enslave their natural superiors by the use of cunning, which is a novel method of power, among the best that life can offer. They strive to make friends, if only to betray them more completely in the future. A face shaped by lotus petals, a voice, as cool as sandalwood, excessive humility and a heart like a pair of scissors is the hallmark of a silent consenter. Their open looks frequently hide their devious hearts. Pleasant smiles are the smooth door behind which villainy waits. They know the fact that all are amenable to profit. There is not profit in hostility. A wise babu by silently consenting to various unreasonable demands of his masters was able to establish a big business for his own self. His subordinates used to call him “Factory-wallah Secretary”. “All men have eyes”, Machiavelli says, “but few have the gift of penetration”.

Passive dissenters are a mix of cunning and convention. Their two personalities smartly co-exist. They never unveil their inner self. They possess political aptitude with moral turpitude. They easily swallow pride, make peace with the circumstances and use words with the skills of a carpet weaver. They use the primal power of sex and the commercial energy of greed. A gentleman encouraged his better-half to cultivate power dons. His arrogance grew directly in proportion to the lustre of his wife’s powerful connections. He licked above and kicked below. The rocket fuel of the lady’s charm, along with her bedroom wisdom and effective male management helped him acquire a remarkable series of mentors and allies, unless he met his nemesis. Passive dissenters believe in Machiavelli’s dictum “Wisdom consists in being able to distinguish among dangers and make a choice of the least harmful.”

Flattery is often better than gifts. A smooth tongue makes faster friends than all the virtues can. A 360-degree network making ability and attitude of upward mobility takes them high on the ladder of life. As they go up the ladder their personality traits become more visible. the higher a monkey climbs the more you see his bottom.

Top

 

Today’s POTO and its foreign and Indian roots
Anupam Gupta

AFTER almost a month of aggressive campaigning for POTO or the Prevention of Terrorism Ordinance, 2001, a reluctant BJP climbed down last week under pressure of its allies in the NDA.

A two-paragraph resolution passed by the coalition partners on November 19 at their meeting at the Prime Minister’s residence threw the entire campaign virtually out of gear.

Unanimously supporting the Ordinance, the resolution “at the same time” requested the Government to “take necessary steps to remove any apprehensions that it can be misused against the Press, political opponents and any specific community.”

Seldom before in the politico-legal history of the sub-continent has a document drafted by the political class expressed so lucidly, and in such few words, the hazards of jurisprudence.

The Noam Chomskys of dissent may well have gone wrong, hopelessly wrong, in their understanding and description of the war against terror whether in India or Afghanistan. Invaluable as they are in a wider philosophical perspective, both anarchism and liberalism often turn out to be grossly misplaced in their appreciation of ground realities, terrorism being the most horrifying and intractable of such realities.

That does not detract, however, from the serious misgivings that the manner and timing of POTO’s promulgation, and the organised political “hardsell” accompanying it, have engendered even amongst those — such as myself — who favour a special law for a special problem such as terrorism.

Misgivings centring on the danger of POTO’s misuse against the Press, political opponents and any specific (that is, the Muslim) community.

Insofar as political opponents and the Muslim community are concerned, the danger — or the possibility of the danger, to be more precise — flows from the Government’s self-empowerment to declare any organisation as a “terrorist organisation” under POTO’s chapter III, comprising Sections 18 to 22.

Independently of individual “terrorist acts” punishable under Section 3, the declaration of an organisation as a terrorist organisation entails sweeping penal consequences for all its members and supporters.

Lifted bodily from the British Terrorism Act, 2000, passed on July 20 last year, Sections 18 to 22 mark a quantum jump in Indian anti-terrorist law, there being nothing of the kind in POTO’s much-maligned predecessor, the Terrorist and Disruptive Activities (Prevention) Act or TADA which lapsed in May, 1995.

Even the draft Prevention of Terrorism Bill, 2000, proposed by the Law Commission of India in its 173rd report did not contain any such provision nor the slightest indication or hint of any such “collectivist” approach to terrorism.

This shift from the individual to the collective, from the person or persons accused of committing a specific terrorist act to an entire organisation “involved” or “deemed to be involved” in terrorism places a very heavy onus, indeed, upon the government, any government.

For the power to declare an organisation as a terrorist organisation vests exclusively in the government — the Central Government, that is — and is subject only to “its belief” that the organisation is “involved in terrorism” or “deemed” to be so involved.

It is here that the political intent of the BJP Government and its rather narrowly defined perceptions — mark the latest controversy over its self-proclaimed censorship of NCERT text-books — throws up a big question mark over the proper and impartial implementation of a law such as POTO.

The safeguard of a Review Committee, empowered to set aside as “flawed” a government decision proscribing an organisation, may well prove futile owing to the nature of the Committee’s composition being left entirely to the government itself. Legal safeguards can be only as independent and effective as the individuals appointed to administer them.

While, therefore, a special law against terrorism is needed and, post-September 11, arguments to the contrary sound rather old-fashioned, a mechanical transplant of the British Terrorism Act to Indian soil might perhaps be a case of overkill.

The possibility of POTO’s misuse against the Press has already attracted furious debate, with Union Law Minister Arun Jaitley accusing the Opposition of using journalists as “holy cows” to fight their political battle against the Ordinance.

Both Mr Jaitley and his journalist-turned political colleague in the Ministry of Disinvestment, Mr Arun Shourie — who is as able a lawyer as any other — have referred repeatedly to Section 39 of the Cr PC to make the point that a citizen’s obligation to “disclose information” of crime, and his liability to prosecution for failure to do so “without reasonable cause”, is not new to POTO but has always been a part of the Indian criminal justice system.

That is undoubtedly true but not a complete statement of the law. And it is completeness that one expects from lawpersons of the calibre of Mr Jaitley and Mr Shourie.

Titled “Public to give information of certain offences”, Section 39 obliges every person, who is “aware of the commission of, or of the intention of any other person to commit”, any of the offences in the Indian Penal Code listed therein, to “forthwith give information to the nearest Magistrate or police officer of such commission or intention”. Failure to do so is an offence punishable under the IPC.

The Section embodies what is known in English law as the offence of “misprision of felony”.

“If men were permitted to trade upon the(ir) knowledge of a crime”, ruled the House of Lords in 1866 in William vs Bayley, speaking through Lord Westbury, “and to convert their privity to that crime into an occasion of advantage, no doubt a great legal and a great moral offence would be committed. And that is what, I apprehend, the old rule of law intended to convey when it embodied the principle under the words, which have now somewhat passed into desuetude, namely ‘misprision of felony’.”

That was a case, he said, when a man, instead of performing his public duty, and giving information to the public authorities of a crime that he was aware of, concealed his knowledge, and further, “converted it into a source of emolument to himself.”

If in any future case, added the Lord Chief Justice of England, Lord Goddard, in 1948 in R vs Aberg, “it is thought necessary or desirable to include in an indictment a count of misprision of felony, great care should be taken to see what — at any rate according to more modern authorities — are the constituents of the offence.”

These comments show, as a leading British work on criminal law, Russell on Crime, points out, how “vague” the law of misprision of felony is. Or, at least, was till as late as 1948.

Then, thirteen years later in 1961, came the decision of the House of Lords in Sykes vs Director of Public Prosecutions.

“My Lords,” said the presiding judge and one of the greatest judges of all time, Lord Denning, in his opening sentence, “this case raises the question whether there is today such an offence as misprision of felony.”

I shall continue next week.
Top

 

Departmental stores mushroom in Delhi despite recession

THERE is no stopping the mushrooming of super-markets and departmental stores in Delhi. Most trade gurus feel that there is a conscious shift of consumers from the unorganised to the organised retail market.

“Shopper’s Stop, opened in the end of 1999, has just broken even ”, says Avnish Khosla, Head, Operations. The mantra of the retail industry is that of expansion rather than downsizing.

Come Nov 27, The Home Store, will launch a flagship aptly called Hyper Mall. Armed with a florist, a hairdresser and a mini creche, Hyper Mall will definitely not be short on the carrots that it offers consumers.

K’s Mall, which opened on Oct 18, promises to give a push to the retail industry. “Convenience and variety are the two foremost things on the consumer’s mind. If he gets both under the same roof, his buying power goes up,” says Ashima Jain, Marketing Manager at K’s Mall.

K’s Mall plans to open branches in Gurgaon, NOIDA and South Extension within the next six months. Westside, the other new store on the western side of the Capital has also not been idle. With seven stores already in place, it is planning to open a new one by December, in Lajpat Nagar. ANI

Food stalls attract visitors at trade fair

For food lovers, the India International Trade Fair is a delight. With a variety of dishes from all corners of the country, the food stalls at the state pavilions are a major attraction for the visitors.

The crowd thronging food stalls at the IITF proves the saying that the way to a person’s heart is through the stomach.

For the participants, it is also a way of promoting the traditional dishes of the state along with their art and culture. Large crowds at these counters have proved business viability of the idea. The variety of the delicacies is fascinating.

Be it the spicy, lip-smacking “chanajor garam” or the delicious “bati churma” at the Rajasthan pavilion, the dishes here have found a way into the hearts of the people.

“People come here and try the dal bati churma, the onion pakoras and various other traditional Rajasthani dishes which are so delicious,” said one of the stall attendants.

The traditional dishes of North at the Punjab pavilion can hardly be resisted by anyone. Dishes like the rajma chaval, sarson da sag and makki di roti are quite popular among visitors. ANI
Top

 
A CENTURY OF NOBELS



Top


 

Greed destroys men in the same manner as the moss pollutes water.

— Var Sattaq Balwand, Sri Guru Granth Sahib, page 967.

* * *

Let God work through you... Let God shine forth... Live God; Eat God; Drink God; Breathe God. Realise the Truth, and the other things will take care of themselves. Live ye the kingdom of Heaven, which is in you, which is you; all other things are added unto you.

— Swami Ramatirtha, In Woods of God Realisation, Vol 5; Forest Talks, No. 4

* * *

One who lives by truth in his own heart

Truly lives in the hearts of all people.

— The Tirukural, 294

* * *

If there is no mercy or gratitude in a man, what is the difference between him and a figure on a wall?

— Sheikh Saadi, Philosophy of the Masters, Series III, Chapter VII

Live in this world as an actor in a drama: never be negligent in playing your part, nor should you claim anything as your own. Negligence in playing one's part will constitute an act of disloyalty to one's master, and to claim anything as your own will be dishonesty, Know this world to be a stage but play the part allotted to you as earnestly as if the world real.

Life is ebbing fast; every moment we are approaching Death and very soon the sands of life will run out. Knowing this keep yourself always harnessed for the coming journey disposing of all your worldy affairs. By harnessing oneself for the journey is meant absolute renunciation of the attractions of the world and developing an intense longing to meet he Lord.

— Hanumanprasad Poddar, Wavelets of Bliss
Top

Home | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Editorial |
|
Business | Sport | World | Mailbag | In Spotlight | Chandigarh Tribune | Ludhiana Tribune
50 years of Independence | Tercentenary Celebrations |
|
121 Years of Trust | Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |