Tuesday, December 31, 2002, Chandigarh, India





National Capital Region--Delhi

THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
W O R L D

Pak to continue on security-risk
list: USA
Washington, December 30
An estimated 2,00,000 Pakistanis will have to appear before the US Immigration and Naturalisation Services (INS) between January 13 and February 21 for special registration, photographs and fingerprinting.

Osama contacted Pak scientist for N-bomb
Islamabad, December 30
A leading Pakistani nuclear scientist, barred from talking to reporters, has made it known through his son that Osama bin Laden approached him before the September 11 attacks for help in making nuclear weapons, reports Toronto Star. The son, Azim Mahmood, said in an interview: “Basically Osama asked my father, ‘How can a nuclear bomb be made and can you help us make one?’”

No tit for tat on visa policy: Pak
Islamabad, December 30
Pakistan today said it was not considering a tit-for-tat response to India’s plans to tighten restrictions on Pakistanis visiting there.

British TV to show ‘man eating baby’
London, December 30
Britain’s Channel 4 television, which recently broadcast the country’s first public autopsy for 170 years, is to show a Chinese artist eating the flesh of a dead baby, a British newspaper reported today.



EARLIER STORIES
 

Ten-year-old identical twins Holly and Noel Adcock are pictured at a Kansas City park on Friday. Cloned baby claim draws flak
London, December 30
World leaders and religious figures joined ranks with scientists at the weekend to pour scorn on claims by a company set up by an obscure cult that it had produced the first clone of a human being.

Ten-year-old identical twins Holly (left) and Noel Adcock are pictured at a Kansas City park on Friday. Though the girls have identical genes, they have differing interests and abilities raising doubts that a human clone could be an exact replica of its progenitor. — AP/PTI

A South Korean activist speaks near a poster of the latest James Bond's movie A South Korean activist speaks near a poster of the latest James Bond's movie "Die Another Day" during a news conference in Seoul on Monday. The activists said the latest Bond film depicted North and South Korea poorly, and said they would start a movement to boycott the movie. The film is scheduled for release in South Korea—the 10th largest overseas box office market for US pictures—on December 31.
— Reuters

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Pak to continue on security-risk list: USA

Washington, December 30
An estimated 2,00,000 Pakistanis will have to appear before the US Immigration and Naturalisation Services (INS) between January 13 and February 21 for special registration, photographs and fingerprinting.

This follows the US Government’s rejection of appeals by Pakistan Ambassador Ashraf Jehangir Qazi that his country be removed from the list of nations whose citizens are considered a security risk. “We are allies in the war against terrorism. We do not belong to this list,” he told reporters here.

But the US authorities were unmoved by the argument that one of its closest allies should not be placed on the list.

Mr Qazi said he had apprised senior US officials of the difficulties the Pakistan Government would face in explaining to the Pakistani public the rationale behind the US move to include the country in the list of nations whose visiting citizens pose a security threat.

While US officials declined to take Pakistan off the list, Mr Qazi was assured that the list was not Pakistan-specific and that it would eventually require visitors from all countries to register with the INS.

According to media reports, the State Department and the National Security Council had voiced opposition to the proposal to include Pakistan in the list, but fell in line once Attorney-General John Ashcroft went ahead with the decision to name Pakistan and Saudi Arabia security-risk countries.

In the face of pressure from the Pakistani community in the USA, Mr Qazi intends to take up the issue with US officials again after the Christmas holiday break, the reports said.

Meanwhile, a group of two influential senators and a Congressman have urged the US Government to suspend the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System until Congress and the Department of Justice and INS conducts a thorough review of the programme. UNI
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Osama contacted Pak scientist for N-bomb

Islamabad, December 30
A leading Pakistani nuclear scientist, barred from talking to reporters, has made it known through his son that Osama bin Laden approached him before the September 11 attacks for help in making nuclear weapons, reports Toronto Star. The son, Azim Mahmood, said in an interview: “Basically Osama asked my father, ‘How can a nuclear bomb be made and can you help us make one?’”

“My father said, ‘No, and secondly you must understand it is not child’s play for you to build a nuclear bomb.’ “

The scientist, Sultan Bashiruddin Mahmood, is under a gag order from Pakistani intelligence officials, but his conversations with Bin Laden in 2000 and as late as July, 2001, were reconstructed by his son.

The conversations as described by the son clearly show Bin Laden was interested in developing nuclear weapons. They don’t, however, shed any light on whether the Al-Qaida leader had taken even the first steps along that complex technological road.

The US Embassy declined to discuss Mahmood’s story. US officials in Washington also would not comment.

There has been previous evidence of the Al-Qaida’s interest in nuclear weapons. Computers found by journalists and US troops at a variety of facilities in Afghanistan indicated that the Al- Qaida had sought to obtain and develop nuclear and other potent weapons. During a New York trial two years ago stemming from bombings at two US embassies in Africa, a former Bin Laden aide testified he was ordered in 1993 to try to buy uranium on the black market to develop a nuclear weapon. Jamal Ahmed Al-Fadl said the Al-Qaida was prepared to spend $ 1.5 million, but he did not know if a purchase was ever made.

In addition, US officials have said captured Al-Qaida lieutenant Abu Zubaydah told US interrogators that the terrorist network was working on a “dirty bomb,” a conventional bomb that would scatter radioactive material. Such a radiological weapon would be far less deadly and damaging than a nuclear explosion.

A United Nations report issued by experts monitoring Al-Qaida movements warned that the Al-Qaida had the potential to obtain nuclear material and build “some kind of dirty bomb.”

The conversations related by Azim Mahmood confirm Bin Laden’s nuclear ambitions. They also offer a glimpse at the nexus of science and conservative Islam at a high level in Pakistan, one of the world’s newest nuclear powers along with neighbouring India.

Mahmood first met Bin Laden in 2000 while visiting Afghanistan to build a school, the son said. He wanted to help the Taliban, because he was angry at the international criticism of the regime’s brand of Islam, the son recalled.

When Bin Laden learned a nuclear scientist was in Kabul, he sent an Al-Qaida operative, Abu Bilal, to Pakistani’s hotel to arrange a meeting, the son said.

“My father went to meet him and he said, ‘Why don’t you come and help us build these things?’ “ Azim Mahmood said, adding that the two men met several times in the Afghan capital and the discussion invariably returned to nuclear weapons. ANI
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No tit for tat on visa policy: Pak

Islamabad, December 30
Pakistan today said it was not considering a tit-for-tat response to India’s plans to tighten restrictions on Pakistanis visiting there.

“We have seen these reports,” but at this point no reciprocal response is being planned, said Interior Ministry spokesman Iftikar Ahmed.

Mr Ahmed said Pakistan would return Indians who had overstayed their visas, many of whom were stuck here because of shut down in rail, road and air links between the two South Asian neighbours following an upsurge in tensions last December.

Currently, Indians travelling to Pakistan have to specify which cities they wish to visit. Mr Ahmed said this process would continue, but there were no plans to restrict the number of cities. AP 
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British TV to show ‘man eating baby’

London, December 30
Britain’s Channel 4 television, which recently broadcast the country’s first public autopsy for 170 years, is to show a Chinese artist eating the flesh of a dead baby, a British newspaper reported today.

The bizarre act will be shown in a documentary called “Beijing Swings”, which looks at extreme practices of Chinese artists. The programme, to be shown on British screens late Thursday, also shows a man drinking wine that has had an amputated penis marinaded in it. “The programme will be controversial and will shock some viewers but a warning will be given before it goes out on air,” a Channel 4 spokesman said. AFP 
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Cloned baby claim draws flak

London, December 30
World leaders and religious figures joined ranks with scientists at the weekend to pour scorn on claims by a company set up by an obscure cult that it had produced the first clone of a human being.

Besides almost universal condemnation across the globe on ethical grounds, many experts doubted whether the world’s first cloned baby had been born at all as the cult had given no proof.

The White House said U S President George W. Bush was “deeply troubled” by the human cloning issue, while French President Jacques Chirac called on all governments to outlaw the practice and punish anyone attempting to create a clone.

The world’s three main monotheistic religions were at one in denouncing the claim.

The announcement of the cloning was made on Friday by a French scientist who belongs to the cult, called the Raelians, which believes human life was begun by aliens who arrived 25,000 years ago and created humans through cloning.

Brigitte Boisselier, chief executive of the cult’s biotech company, Clonaid, told a news conference in Hollywood, Florida, the baby girl, called Eve, was born to a 31-year-old woman after being cloned from cells taken from the mother. She said the parents, who had been infertile, did not wish to show off the baby and declined to disclose who they were or where the child had been born. Reuters 
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GLOBAL MONITOR


Nepalese women walk past policemen standing guard during the second day of a general strike
Nepalese women walk past policemen standing guard during the second day of a general strike in Kathmandu on Monday. — Reuters

27 KILLED IN PRISON FIRE
TEHERAN: A prison fire in northern Iran on Monday killed 27 persons and injured around 50, the state-run IRNA news agency quoted unofficial sources as saying. Officials in Gorgan, close to the Caspian Sea, declined to confirm the number of dead, it said. The fire, which broke out in the early hours today, was probably caused by an electrical fault. Reuters

THREE US DOCTORS SHOT
SAN’A
:
Three US doctors were shot on Monday in a missionary hospital at Jibla in Yemen where they worked, security officials said. The attacker, a suspected fundamentalist, was later arrested, the officials said, without providing further details. A fourth American, the hospital’s pharmacist, was seriously injured. AP

MADONNA BANS GAME SHOOTING ON ESTATE
LONDON:
Madonna has banned game shooting at her £ 9 million, 1,200-acre country estate in Wiltshire, England because she believes the souls of thousands of dead game birds will return to haunt her, according to a press report. Britain’s Mail newspaper reported on Sunday that the millionaire pop singer’s devotion to Kabbala, an ancient mystical tradition which counts reincarnation among its central beliefs, was behind the decision to end all bloodsports at her Ashcombe estate. DPA

MALAYALAM RADIO BROADCAST FROM UAE
DUBAI:
Radio Asia, a pioneer in broadcasting Indian language programmes from the Gulf, has become the first-ever Malayalam radio station to provide services round-the-clock from the UAE and the 24-hour broadcast will begin from the New Year. PTI
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