Wednesday, July 23, 2003, Chandigarh, India





National Capital Region--Delhi

E D I T O R I A L   P A G E


EDITORIALS

Acts of desperation
Terrorists can’t stand the turnaround in Kashmir
T
HE terrorist attacks on the army camp at Akhnoor on Tuesday morning in which a Brigadier and seven jawans were killed and on the Vaishno Devi pilgrims at Banganga a day earlier in which six innocents lost their lives are a sign of desperation gripping the terrorists.

Kalpakkam leak
Ensuring safety is vital
Six months ago, on January 21 to be exact, India suffered its worst nuclear accident. Due to a valve failure at the Kalpakkam Reprocessing Plant (KARP), high-level radioactive waste entered a tank designed for low-level waste.

Parkinson's law officers
Punjab is proving him right
A lawyer with his hands in his own pockets is indeed a rare sight. It must be rarer still in Punjab where a large number of lawyers seem to have perfected the art of keeping their hands warm at the expense of the tax payers. 



EARLIER ARTICLES

THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
 
OPINION

Too many MiGs are crashing
Absence of AJT is the main cause
by A.S. Sethi
Whenever there is a MiG crash, quite genuinely, much hue and cry is raised through the media and an equally disturbing concern expressed by the general public. One is often confronted with the question: why so many MiG aircraft accidents in the IAF?

MIDDLE

Bureaucratic ways
by Shriniwas Joshi
I had once gone to a hospital for my routine checkup. After a long drill of this and that test, I was given a slip by the all-knowing lab-tech that disclosed that I was three-month pregnant. I asked him, “How could it be?” He said, “Is ka jawab to MS denge.” People concerned told me that the MS — Medical Superintendent — was Dr Jekyll, in fact, but that day he was in Mr Hyde mood. 

Many states deny mid-day meals to kids
V. Eshwar Anand,
a Tribune staffer, examines the working of the scheme
U
nfortunately, the mid-day meal scheme is not being implemented by many states despite the Supreme Court’s directive of November 28, 2001 to provide cooked meals to primary school students within six months of its order. Several studies over the years have proved the scheme’s immense benefits in terms of bringing down the drop-out rate and improving the students’ attendance in schools.

Embarking on an office romance?
by Jamie Doward and Tom Reilly
B
rian could contain himself no longer. Slowly he lowered his mouth to Debbie’s upturned face. Her back arched, ready for the kiss. There, between photocopier and water cooler, the dazzling head of accounts was determined to consummate his union with the nubile typing clerk.

REFLECTIONS

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Acts of desperation
Terrorists can’t stand the turnaround in Kashmir

THE terrorist attacks on the army camp at Akhnoor on Tuesday morning in which a Brigadier and seven jawans were killed and on the Vaishno Devi pilgrims at Banganga a day earlier in which six innocents lost their lives are a sign of desperation gripping the terrorists. Though a terrorist organisation has claimed responsibility for the dastardly killings, it could be a red herring. However, there is no mistaking that they have been carried out by those who do not want peace to return to the state. By choosing pilgrims as their targets, they have proved how inhuman they are. They are misguided mercenaries who sacrifice their lives either for the money their family members receive or for the supposedly greater glory that awaits them after death. Security forces have definitely come a long way since they began their fight against terrorism but they are yet to come to grips with the phenomenon called 'fidayeen'. This explains, to a large extent, the heavy casualties the army and civilians have suffered. No security agency anywhere in the world has come up with a foolproof strategy against suicide attacks but the need for such a strategy cannot be overemphasised as terrorist organisations seem to have inexhaustible sources of gullible youth who are ready to be brainwashed into killing themselves.

Calibrated attacks of this kind are not possible without careful planning, sophisticated weapons, logistical and monetary backing. Only an intelligence organisation like Pakistan's ISI can provide this kind of support. The reason why the killers have struck now is not far to seek. There has been a thaw in Indo-Pakistan relations since Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee offered his "hand of friendship". Diplomatic relations between the two countries have, more or less, been restored. The bus service between Lahore and New Delhi has helped in establishing better people-to-people contacts. All this had a salutary effect on the ground situation in Jammu and Kashmir. And to cap it all, President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam had an extensive tour of the State where thousands of people cheered him wherever he went. As a result of these positive signals, there has been some sort of a revival of the tourism industry in the state. In short, the people had begun to look forward to, rather than lament over the past.

It is this turnaround that the terrorists want to offset. Their objective in targeting the Hindu pilgrims is to communalise the situation. While the nation has to guard against falling into their trap, Pakistan needs to be told in unambiguous terms that India expects the proxy war to come to an end before full normalcy can be restored in their bilateral relations. All that the Pakistan President, General Pervez Musharraf, has to do is to stop providing patronage to the terrorist organisations. India will take care of the rest.

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Kalpakkam leak
Ensuring safety is vital

Six months ago, on January 21 to be exact, India suffered its worst nuclear accident. Due to a valve failure at the Kalpakkam Reprocessing Plant (KARP), high-level radioactive waste entered a tank designed for low-level waste. Six workers received extremely high doses of radiation. According to prescribed safety norms, the effective dose to individual workers should not exceed 30 milli-sievert (mSv) in one full year. But the workers all of a sudden received overexposures in the range of 280 mSv, with one of them receiving a staggering 420 mSv - more than four times the permissible cumulative dose in any five-year period (100 mSv). The risk of cancer and leukaemia looms large. Since atomic-energy installations at Kalpakkam, 70 km from Chennai, consist of top-security areas, there was hardly any mention of the incident in daily newspapers. But a news magazine, Outlook, has now blown the lid off the chilling incident. Mercifully, instead of denying the story, officials have candidly admitted that the incident did take place. Nor have they been coy about the magnitude of the problem. Says Mr B. Bhattacharjee, Director of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC): “This is the worst accident in radiation exposure in the history of nuclear India….The loss is invaluable”.

The leakage and the subsequent turn of events make one jittery about the safety of our atomic plants. Nuclear-installations ought to have zero-tolerance level as far as adhering to security safeguards is concerned, but a casual approach seems to be prevalent. The BARC director is reported to have admitted that some of the workers - one of them a woman — were not even wearing badges (necessary to monitor their total exposure). The employees allege that the reprocessing plant continued to function even after the incident. Not only that, the plant does not even have a full-time trained safety officer.

All that makes extremely gloomy reading. A malfunctioning atomic plant is not only a threat to the immediate neighbourhood and human habitations but the entire country. The laxity about safety and occupational health has agitated members of the scientific community greatly. Those responsible for ensuring safety should not resist transparency just because strategic areas have to be kept away from the prying eyes. The worst enemy of the nation is the indifferent attitude, which hopefully BARC is trying to guard against. 


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Parkinson's law officers
Punjab is proving him right

A lawyer with his hands in his own pockets is indeed a rare sight. It must be rarer still in Punjab where a large number of lawyers seem to have perfected the art of keeping their hands warm at the expense of the tax payers. The tax payers do not complain. With one Advocate-General and 111 Senior Additional Advocates-General, Additional Advocates-General, Senior Deputy Advocates-General, Deputy Advocates-General and Assistant Advocates-General supporting the case for the monumental size of the Punjab Law Office, the tax payers would not stand even a ghost of a chance of preventing miscarriage of justice. The law is not always an ass. Animal lovers should take equal interest in the plight of fellow travellers. At least an Iranian vet who recently filed a case in defence of the country's donkeys may show the way to their Indian counterparts whose "brayers" for relief usually fall on deaf ears. The Iranian is fighting individuals and government departments for putting too much weight on the poor non-complaining beasts.

But it is not going to be easy to make the Punjab Advocate-General's office shed flab. According to Parkinson's law, "work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion". The size of the Punjab Law Office provides confirmation of Prof Cyril Northcote Parkinson's edict. This law recognises that an official wants to multiply subordinates, not rivals, and these subordinates create work for each other for the official to justify their recruitment. It is impossible to make the lawyers eat humble pie because there is now official confirmation that as far as professions go, theirs is the oldest. The surgeon who thought his was the oldest profession because Eve was carved out of the rib of Adam was proved wrong by an architect. The architect pointed out that God took seven days to fashion the universe out of chaos, so his had to be the oldest profession. But the lawyer clinched the argument by asking them, "and who created chaos?" Even if lawyers are sent to jail they may file a suit against themselves claiming that they violated their own civil liberties, but ask the State to pay damages because they had no income in jail!

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Thought for the day

Death never takes the wise man by surprise; he is always ready to go.
— Jean de la Fontaine

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Too many MiGs are crashing
Absence of AJT is the main cause
by A.S. Sethi

Whenever there is a MiG crash, quite genuinely, much hue and cry is raised through the media and an equally disturbing concern expressed by the general public. One is often confronted with the question: why so many MiG aircraft accidents in the IAF?

In fact, the alarm on this important issue was raised as early as 1981-82. I was then posted at the Central Air Command, IAF, as Command Flight Safety and Inspection Officer (CFSIO). A letter from the then Chief of Air Staff, the late Air Chief Marshal Dilbagh Singh, conveying personal concern of the then Prime Minister, Indira Gandhi, on the rising aircraft accident rate was circulated to all the Air Commands of the IAF. Her remarks on the note put up to her, on the state of flight safety in the IAF, if I recollect correctly, read: the situation is far from satisfactory; this is obvious.

The major outcome of these remarks, however, was setting up of a special committee on flight safety by the government under the chairmanship of the then Air Marshal and later Chief of Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal D.A. La Fontaine.

The point to highlight here is that a committee which was formed primarily to examine as to why the aircraft accident rate was rising in the operational flying units, pinpointed in its two-volume report that the quality and content of our flying training had certain inadequacies which needed immediate improvement. The committee's most crucial observation, of course, was the lack of suitable trainer aircraft, the Advanced Jet Trainer (AJT), a transonic aircraft which could fill the quantum gap between the basic subsonic Kiran and the frontline supersonic MiG aircraft.

The other serious lacunae brought out by the committee was the induction of half-baked ops (U/T Ops) pilots in the operational squadrons, which had neither an adequate number of trainer aircraft nor the qualified instructional staff, nor the requisite training aids. Such a training system not only diluted the combat effectiveness of the operational flying squadrons but also adversely affected their flight safety performance and inordinately delayed the operational training of these young U/T ops pilots.

The committee, therefore, recommended a new “three-stage flying training pattern" for the IAF which, in fact, is now being followed even by the United States Air Force. In stage-I the training is conducted on HPT-32, a piston engine trainer aircraft, while in stage-II the cadet is trained in tactical flying on Kiran mark-II trainer aircraft. On completion of the second stage the trainees are commissioned, given wings and trifurcated into three streams — fighters, transport and helicopters.

In pursuance of the La Fontaine committee training concept, the stage-III training, which was earlier being conducted in the combat squadrons, was now being undertaken by the dedicated operational training units, namely the MiG Operational Flying Training Unit (MOFTU) and the Hunter Operational Flying Training Unit (HOFTU). HOFTU has since been closed down due to the phasing out of the Hunter Aircraft. MOFTU and HOFTU were, in fact, created as an interim arrangement in the absence of the AJT which was to be inducted on a high priority.

It is indeed a sad story that more than two decades have elapsed but the AJT is not there owing to the insensitivity of the successive governments to the crying need of the IAF for an advance jet trainer. There can be no denying that non-implementation of this crucial recommendation of the La Fontaine committee has taken, and continues to take, a heavy toll on flight safety of the fighter fleet, in terms of staggeringly expensive aircraft and invaluable human lives. Because the transition from the Kiran, a basic subsonic trainer, to a frontline supersonic MiG-21 aircraft is a quantum jump (in terms of the pilots cockpit, controls, speeds and overall high performance profile).

In layman’s language, it is like asking a baby to start running the day he has learnt to stand on his two feet. Such a quantum jump makes the assimilation of flying training in stage-III quite complex. It is a sudden jump from subsonic to supersonic profile with the transonic stage-III of the AJT type completely missing.

The La Fontaine committee had recommended a review of its recommendations after a period of 10 years. One wonders as to what kind of a review can be carried out when its most vital recommendations have not been implemented for more than 20 years. In the absence of an effective solution, whenever the accident rate shoots up, the Air Force sets up ad-hoc committees on flight safety which serve very little purpose. I know of one such committee, the Rathore Committee under the chairmanship of Air Marshal Rathore. I was a Senior Air Staff Officer (SASO) at the Headquarters Training Command, IAF, when it was set up. From The Training Command side we told the committee that mere tinkering with and tailoring of the training syllabi were not going to provide an answer to the real problem.

It may be mentioned that the IAF on its part has spared no effort to stress the issue. Whatever the public postures, the successive Air Chiefs have been knocking at the doors of the government which seems to have been turning a deaf ear for reasons best known to it. I remember when I was the Director of Training (now called Assistant Chief of Air Chief, Training) at Air Headquarters, the then Air Chief Marshal, N.C Suri, emerged from the Commanders conference with a beaming smile and announced, “Well, boys the AJT is on the horizon — the government has given a green signal.” Unfortunately, the horizon continues to remain cluttered with clouds till date.

The AJT project, which was to initially cost Rs 500 crore in the early eightees after the acceptance of the recommendations of the La Fontaine Committee report by the government, would now cost a whopping over Rs 3000 crore and would continue to escalate with every passing day.

If the latest figure of category - I (total write-off) accidents every 17 days, as quoted in the media, is authentic then we do not need the enemy action, nor do we require a formal phasing out of the ageing MiG fleet. We seem to be doing the needful ourselves. A question quite naturally arises: can other countries like the US, the UK, France or Germany accept a high rate of accident, with such a large number of fatalities like that of ours? The answer is an emphatic NO! In those countries the governments are more accountable to their people as the general public there is well informed and enlightened on matters relating to defence and national security.

We must face the fact that the fourth largest air force in the world. continues to be without an operational trainer aircraft and keeps paying the price for it. While the absence of an AJT is a main reason for the high rate of accidents, there are certain other factors too which impinge on flight safety. These are the ageing of the MiG fleet; lack of spares support in the aftermath of disintegration of the erstwhile USSR; lagging behind in the maintenance environment and infrastructure vis-a-vis the induction of more advance technologies; and constraints being faced in the availability of good quality manpower, which is increasingly being drawn by more lucrative and attractive avenues. All these areas need to be addressed to in an honest and holistic way if we are to ensure an operationally effective and fully combat-worthy air force and not be content merely with its size and numbers.

It must be emphasised that the AJT is an indispensable requirement. The sooner it is met, the better it will be for operational as well as flight safety well-being of the Indian Air Force.

The writer, a retired Air Marshal, is a former Director of Air Safety, Indian Air Force.

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Bureaucratic ways
by Shriniwas Joshi

I had once gone to a hospital for my routine checkup. After a long drill of this and that test, I was given a slip by the all-knowing lab-tech that disclosed that I was three-month pregnant. I asked him, “How could it be?” He said, “Is ka jawab to MS denge.” People concerned told me that the MS — Medical Superintendent — was Dr Jekyll, in fact, but that day he was in Mr Hyde mood. I dared not go to his office and found that the Chief Medical Officer was also playing hooky.

I do not know what propelled me to go to a very senior civil servant sitting in the chair of Secretary (Health), known in the bureaucratic circle for his habit of going off at a tangent, and tell him about the wrong reporting or the possible inter-mixing of urine samples or some shortcoming somewhere. He glanced through the slip given to me by the hospital and instead of taking some action against the negligence, started counselling me on how to be a good mother. He even explained to me the method of breastfeeding the twins, if the situation might arise. The lesson is that if someone forces on you the donkey-ship, the grandmother expects you to bray.

The same blood flows in the veins of the elder sister too, i.e. the Central Government. My brother-in-law had started a consultancy in engineering in Delhi. he told me that when he went to the Ministry of Surface Transport while applying for registration of this consultancy there and wanted to know the procedure for the same, the officer, while keeping his countenance passed on a list of 27 consultancies to him that had already stood registered with the ministry. He told him that he was free to find out the procedure of getting registered with the ministry from anyone figuring in the list. The lesson is that never bother the grandmother when grandchildren are there to teach one how to suck eggs!

My brother-in-law was in Riyadh prior to fishing in Delhi waters. He informed me that there a Mudeer (Boss in Saudi Arabia) always used to sit in style in office with bottoms on chair and legs wide-spread on table. An Indian doctor had some work with him. Mudeer who did not understand English never bothered to make out meaning of the sign language that the doctor had been using. Nothing moved. The doctor was frustrated more by those known legs ever present on table. One day he met his Sudanese friend who knew Arabic too. He went to Mudeer with him and also could convey to him the discomfort that he felt seeing his legs stretched on table. The boss without change in his posture or poise replied that the “docturaa” be told that the day he kept his legs on ground there would be no need of these “Indian Docturaas” here. The lesson is when grandmother holds the purse; even the lame mare leaping over a stile has to go a mile.

Oliver Frank’s saying “the Pentagon, that immense monument to modern man’s subservience to desk” and Sisson’s epitaph, “Here lies a civil servant. He was civil/To none, and servant to the Delhi” made me think aloud that bureaucracy was same-faced everywhere.

My better half was quick in delivering a riposte, “Did you say shame-faced?”n



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Many states deny mid-day meals to kids
V. Eshwar Anand,
a Tribune staffer, examines the working of the scheme

Unfortunately, the mid-day meal scheme is not being implemented by many states despite the Supreme Court’s directive of November 28, 2001 to provide cooked meals to primary school students within six months of its order. Several studies over the years have proved the scheme’s immense benefits in terms of bringing down the drop-out rate and improving the students’ attendance in schools. They also show that diseases such as anaemia and skin affections, common among children of deprived sections, declined dramatically after the introduction of the scheme in schools.


What’s the menu today?

Photos: Kuldip Dhiman

However, the fact that only 14 states — Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Gujarat, Orissa, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Delhi — and two Union Territories — Chandigarh and Pondicherry — have implemented the scheme shows that over half of the country’s school children are deprived of the benefits. According to an estimate, 63 per cent of India’s children go hungry everyday. Half the children in the 6-14 age group do not have access to primary education. This, according to the United Nation’s “State of the World’s Children Report-1999”, implies that 40 million children are out of school.

In Punjab, the scheme remained unattractive for quite some time because Punjabi students in over 13,000 primary schools were reluctant to eat “sukhi” roti. However, they started attending schools once the government changed the menu with matthis, motichoor laddoos, pinni, kadah and pulao. Even otherwise, the scheme is being implemented only as a pilot project in 17 blocks, one in each district. Steps should be taken to expand the scope of the project, keeping in view the high incidence of drop-out in the schools. According to the Punjab Development Report 2001 of the state’s Planning Department, the incidence of drop-out was as high as 22.17 per cent as against 67.5 per cent enrolment during 1995-99.

In Haryana, the government has been implementing the scheme in six blocks of the Mewat region comprising Gurgaon and Faridabad districts. Education Commissioner Murarilal Tayal says that this is being done in conformity with the Supreme Court’s directive. Further expansion of the scheme is under the active consideration of the government. In fact, after the government stopped serving cooked food to students in July 1996 and replaced it with the supply of wheat and rice, the Comptroller and Auditor-General had pointed out in his report that this not only failed to increase the enrolment and attendance in schools but also increased the drop-out rate.

The results of a comparative study in Karnataka show that cooked mid-day meals could effectively address issues relating to school enrolment, retention and learning levels. A study entitled “Urban Poverty and Education Deprivation” by Bangalore’s National Institute of Advanced Studies notes the extent to which attendance levels in a Bangalore slum school are determined by the provision of a mid-day meal. Not only is the meal an attraction to poor students (as also parents), but it also enhances the attention span and levels of children and ensures that “absenteeism due to illness” is reduced.

Reports of over 300 students having taken ill in Karnataka after a mid-day meal are, no doubt, a setback to the scheme. However, it goes to the credit of Chief Minister S. M. Krishna that he has decided to implement the Rs 320-crore scheme in the entire state. It is noteworthy that Tamil Nadu is a success story, especially under the regimes of Kamaraj Nadar and M.G. Ramachandran. But it took years and crores of rupees to perfect the scheme there. Thus, keeping Tamil Nadu as the role model, why can’t all states implement the scheme with sincerity and earnestness?

Sadly, except in the southern states, the picture elsewhere is rather disquieting. There are infrastructural and logistic problems, but a way out should be found to implement the scheme. Orissa, for instance, cannot afford LPG and has a problem of procuring firewood. Andhra Pradesh, of course, is lucky. When Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu did not get a favourable response for 100 LPG connections for the scheme from Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited, he could save the mid-day meal scheme by requisitioning the LPG under the Deepam scheme.

It is true that the teachers’ attention gets diverted once they start cooking the meals. However, the state governments, while continuing their superintendence, direction and control over the scheme, can entrust the task of cooking food to panchayats, anganwadis, destitute women and the like. Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh have done this. Rajasthan, of course, has set a unique example. The daily problem of engaging teachers and students in cooking “ghooghri” (a mixture of jaggery and boiled wheat) has been entrusted to destitute women (especially widows).

For the success of the scheme, philanthrophic and voluntary organisations should also come forward to implement the scheme. The Akshaya Patra Foundation in Bangalore, for instance, has made a remarkable effort in this regard. The Foundation, which began a mid-day meal programme in July 2000, now feeds 43,000 children in 123 schools in Bangalore Rural district. Located in the premises of the magnificent ISKCON temple in Bangalore City, the Foundation provides facilities for preparation of the meals and for transportation to the schools. Its target is to feed 2,50,000 school children by 2005!

There is no denying the fact that some states have genuine problems in implementing the scheme. But as it is a Centrally-sponsored programme, they should not lag behind. It is also important that in the light of the latest reports of food-poisoning in some Karnataka schools, there is need for streamlining the procurement, the delivery and the surveillance mechanism of the mid-day meal scheme. If there are problems in identifying the suppliers of quality foodgrains for the scheme, the authorities concerned will have to do proper homework and plug the loopholes.
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Embarking on an office romance?
by Jamie Doward and Tom Reilly

Brian could contain himself no longer. Slowly he lowered his mouth to Debbie’s upturned face. Her back arched, ready for the kiss. There, between photocopier and water cooler, the dazzling head of accounts was determined to consummate his union with the nubile typing clerk.

‘Wait’, she shrieked. `We can’t.’ ‘Because you’re married?’ panted Brian.

`No,’ sobbed Debbie. `I haven’t informed human resources yet. We have to email them that we’re having an affair. Remember what happened to Derek...’ Bad fiction it may be, but it’s also uncomfortably close to the truth. Love and the law are on a collision course, and the unlikely battleground is the office.

Concerns over litigation resulting from office affairs are prompting more and more companies to order their staff to confess to their liaisons between the filing cabinets - or face the sack.

UK Government departments, their secret services and parts of the BBC have already told staff they must own up if they are having sexual relationships with their colleagues in an effort to stave off the threat of costly - not to mention embarrassingly high profile — law suits.

Companies fear that staff may be able to sue if rival workers who are conducting affairs with their bosses are promoted over them. Worse, if the affair turns sour, a disgruntled employee could claim they were overlooked for promotion by their former lover.

But regulating workplace affairs is a daunting prospect. At least half of us meet our partners at work, and around 40 per cent of employees admit to having had a fling with at least one colleague, according to a recently published book, Sex at Work.

The office might not be the most romantic place for love to blossom, but it happens, say psychologists, because of the way we live now. ` We work such long hours, especially in industries such as financial services, journalism and IT, that this should not come as a surprise,’ said Cary Cooper, a psychology professor at Manchester School of Management.

`When people work under stressful situations, it is common for colleagues to become each other’s counsellor. They may discuss issues that are concerning each other or complain to one another about their bosses. This sharing of problems can be an integral part of building confidences that lead a relationship to start,’ Cooper said.

Affairs have always happened at work but our increasingly litigious society means companies now have to take what would once have been treated as salacious gossip far more seriously. `We live in a culture where more employees are aware of their rights and therefore companies have to be more savvy about the claims they face and protect themselves accordingly,’ said Laura O’Connor, an employment lawyer at Collyer-Bristow.

Research by academics at the University of Sydney suggests that almost a quarter of failed office relationships end in sexual harassment cases, and a survey in America by the Society for Human Resource Management found that 52 per cent of companies believe they suffer in some way because of romance in the workplace. Nearly a third of employees quizzed said they feared office affairs would end in claims of sexual harassment. Small wonder then that 95 per cent of personnel managers said they believed office romances should not be allowed or, at least, should be discouraged. — Guardian News Service

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He who lovingly adores God, the King, wins the battle of life and conquers his mind. He remains immersed in God’s love day and night, and comes to know Him who pervades the three worlds and the four ages. He then becomes like Him whom he knows. He is rendered very pure and his body is sanctified. God dwells in his heart as his only love. He cherishes the Word within himself and remains attuned to the Truth.

Ramkali, 931

They alone who praise God early in the morning, meditate on Him wholeheartedly and grapple with their selves at the right time, are the perfect kings.

Majh, 145
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