SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
M A I L B A G

Expulsions: SC is doing its duty

ALL the three wings have their respective powers and jurisdictions and each one has to perform its functions in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution. For example, the Constitution has empowered only the courts to interpret the Constitution and judge the constitutionality or legality of any action taken by the executive or the legislature. Thus, Mr Somnath Chatterjee’s stand on the court’s jurisdiction is improper and amounts to interference with the functioning of the judiciary.

This writer holds no brief for corrupt elements, whether in the executive, legislature or judiciary. But it is true that today no one can be elected as MP or MLA without unfair and corrupt means and practices. Where and who are the holy cows amongst our present-day politicians? Parliament cannot bypass the Constitution. Therefore, the Speaker need not feel touchy if the judiciary goes into the question of the constitutionality and legality of Parliament’s power to expel tainted members.



Dear readers

Letters to the Editor, neatly hand-written or typed, upto 150 words, should be sent to the Letters Editor, The Tribune, Sector 29 C, Chandigarh. Letters can also be emailed at the following address: letters@tribunemail.com

— Editor-in-Chief

 

II

The only solution to the present crisis is that the Supreme Court should refrain from examining Parliament’s power to expel tainted members. It should not entertain petitions from corrupt, opportunistic and expelled members for reviewing the decision taken by Parliament.

For all purposes, the Speaker’s (by extension Parliament’s) right to expel tainted members should not be questioned or examined by the judiciary.

SUNDER SINGH GIANI, Dialpura (Patiala)

III

I endorse the editorial stand in The Tribune that the Speaker is right. People have overwhelmingly supported Parliament’s decision on expulsion of tainted members. Parliament enjoys some privileges which no one can challenge. The decision was a collective decision of Parliament. So, where is the question of judicial interference?

The Speaker is the custodian of the House. He is an impartial referee. One cannot go into the merits of the decision. The expulsions will help set a healthy convention in the world’s largest democracy.

PREM SAGAR SHARMA, Sangrur

IV

Parliament has rightly expelled the tainted members. It has powers to expel tainted members. In fact, the matter should not rest here. The expelled members should apologise to the nation on a public platform.

Further, they must be debarred from seeking election to any representative institution or appointed to public office.

DAYANAND, Ch. Dadri

V

All the three organs of the state should work in close cooperation with each other. They must respect each other’s powers and functions. Confrontation must be avoided. The Supreme Court’s notice to the Lok Sabha Speaker on the issue of expulsions is not in the best traditions of our federal polity. The judiciary may have the power of judicial review, but on this specific issue of expulsion, it has no power to interfere.

N.M. HANSI, Ludhiana

 

Mess in Karnataka

Karnataka Chief Minister Dharam Singh has resigned on Saturday without seeking the confidence vote in the State Assembly on Friday. The Congress has been blamed for the mess in Karnataka on the ground that it cannot handle coalitions. That may be true, but the real architect of the mess is former Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda.

The Congress should have given the Chief Minister’s post to the Janata Dal (Secular) after it lost the mandate in 2004 elections. However, once Mr Dharam Singh was installed after a month-long tussle, it was Mr Deve Gowda’s duty to assist and support him in governance and development.

Unfortunately, Mr Deve Gowda left no opportunity to undercut Mr Dharam Singh and derailed the whole process of governance. Administration became the worst casualty in the state because of the continued bickering among the coalition partners in the past 20 months.

PRANAV SACHDEVA, New Delhi

Of mind and ideas

A modern girl has short hair and is scantily dressed. One can invariably find four things in her purse — comb, mirror, lipstick and powder. This was the general response of my class students when I was teaching them modernisation.

However, one does not become modern simply by following the West, the way they dress up or by speaking a foreign language. Modernism has something to do with the mind and ideas. A person who follows the West in every way but is neither aware of the surroundings nor changes his views accordingly can’t be called modern.

ANCHAL GARG, Mansa
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