SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS

           J A L A N D H A R

Every Friday

For Cheema brothers, the game must go on
Till the early nineties, this family of basketball players made the nation proud on courts across the world. Now they are handing over the big red ball to the equally-talented next generation, reports Deepkamal Kaur

The game runs in the family. Over six feet tall men, who have won baskets-full of glory in the seventies, eighties and early nineties, are now watching the new generation enter and excel in the “family game”. 
The Cheema brothers who were once a rage on the basketball court The Cheema brothers who were once a rage on the basketball court. — Tribune photo by Pawan Sharma









EARLIER EDITIONS

 

Earning livelihood from demonstrations
The livelihood of this family depends on the number of demonstrations held in the city. Working with straw, waste paper and bamboo sticks, they carve out the most commonly used props for the protests organised in the city. Almost all members of this joint family operating from their residence-cum-shop behind the Central Jail are engaged in making effigies.
Effigy-makers selling glittery buntings in Jalandhar. — Tribune photo by Pawan Sharma
Effigy-makers selling glittery buntings in Jalandhar

Noise pollution? Only if you are not ‘party’ to it
With the year’s first marriage season going full throttle, many people in the city say they are searching for some relief now: not because of too many invitations but, as they add, because of too much noise.

Say it with flowers on the D-day 
When it comes to floral arrangements at weddings, individuality rather than convention is the norm. And it is idiosyncratically stylish to be profligate at the weddings. At a recent wedding in Phagwara, a family is said to have splurged Rs 2 lakh just on floral arrangements.

What’s in a name?
Numerous shops, showrooms and even garages in this city of NRIs and wannabe NRIs carry names of foreign locales 

Birmingham Car Garage, Dubai Jewellers, Singapore Emporium and the Cambridge International School for Girls. No, these are not the names of off-shore workshops, showrooms or institutions. These are all here in Jalandhar. Most of these have been started by the people who lived abroad for long and returned with bag and baggage to begin a new enterprise back home. Sometimes, those who yearn to move to greener pastures also go in for names with foreign connections.

The singer and the poet
It was a rare treat for music lovers with the singer of the hit song “Naag Sahmbh Lai Zulfan De” and its lyricist came together again. It was Jazzy B and the California-based lyricist, Mr Makhan Loharanwala, and the occasion was a “Sanman Samaroh” organised by the Punjabi Kala and Sahit Kendar, Phagwara, and the Punjabi monthly magazine “Sangeet Darpan” here on Thursday.

‘Punjaban Mutiyaar’ keeps the culture alive
College-going students competing to show their expertise at a spinning wheel, girls preparing flour with manual “chakki” and weaving “Phulkari” — the Punjaban Mutiyaar contest to be held during the “Punjabi Sabhyacharak Pidh,” to be organised in Kapurthala in the last week of February, would provide an opportunity to girls to show their talents and artistic skills.

The ‘saas bahu’ of kids
With a surfeit of cartoon channels, children in the city have found their own escape route

“When would Bob the Builder come and repair our roads?,” six-year-old Rohan often asks his father while they travel on the bumpy roads of the city of Jalandhar. “Bob the Builder”, “Pokemon”, “Scooby Doo”, and “Powerpuff Girls” and many others are a rage in the households with a TV and children.

Playing a good Samaritan
Playing a Good Samaritan is not always an easy job. It can be mistaken to be a misplaced sympathy or even a patronizing attitude. But these dampeners have not affected Mr Michael Sehgal, a Newcastle-based NRI, who has taken upon himself to sponsor a student every year to Northumbria University in the United Kingdom. Mr Sehgal, who is in the city these days, said that he wanted to give his bit to his native land.

Michael Sehgal receiving the honour of MBE from Prince Charles.
Michael Sehgal receiving the honour of MBE from Prince Charles'

Seminar on socio-economic paradigms
The Department of History and Sociology, Hans Raj Mahila Maha Vidyalaya, organised a seminar on ‘Changing socio-economic paradigms in the north-western region’ on last Saturday. Dr Pam Rajput, Executive Director, Women Resources and Advocacy Centre, Chandigarh, spoke on various socio-economic issues such as the declining sex ratio, NRI marriages, consumerist culture, crime against women and privatisation of education.

A bird’s-eye view

Birds of feather are said to flock together. But little do these guinea fowls know that they may end up as a dish at a dinner table. These birds are being sold along the GT Road in the city. Photo: S.S. Chopra

Cultural programmes organised
A cultural programme was organised by the Department of Punjabi, Government Arts and Sports College, on Saturday. Two Canada-based Indian artists, Supanpreet and Rajesh Raju, shared their experiences with the students even as they sang songs to entertain them.

Students bid adieu to seniors
The Plus One students of Police DAV Public School bid adieu to Plus Two students on Wednesday. The cultural function began with a welcome address by Vishesh, anchor of the show. Dance items were presented by Ishita, Vatsalaya and Nishant.

Amjad Ali Khan to perform today
There’s good news for music enthusiasts. Ustad Amjad Ali Khan and his two sons, Ayaan and Amaan Ali Bangash, would perform on Friday in the “Peace & Serenity” concert at the Red Cross Bhavan here.

Lecture on ‘Knowledge Management’
Dr Suresh Chadha, Professor, University Business School, Panjab University, delivered a lecture on “Knowledge Management” at the Apeejay College of Fine Arts on last Friday. He gave a motto that knowledge is power and gave the message of improving knowledge base through its sharing.

In tune with tradition — modernity does not always hold charm 

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For Cheema brothers, the game must go on
Till the early nineties, this family of basketball players made the nation proud on courts across the world. Now they are handing over the big red ball to the equally-talented next generation, reports Deepkamal Kaur

The next generation of the Cheemas
The next generation of the Cheemas. — Tribune photo by Pawan Sharma

The game runs in the family. Over six feet tall men, who have won baskets-full of glory in the seventies, eighties and early nineties, are now watching the new generation enter and excel in the “family game”.

The Cheema brothers, a popular name in the Indian basketball team till the last decade, are now training a new brigade of boys who have already proven their mettle at the national level. One of the youngsters is a gold medalist in the Junior National Basketball Championship and the other one is a four-time participant in the Inter-University Basketball Championship and has won medals thrice.

The younger two but more promising are getting trained at the Baba Lodhiana Basketball Academy in Ludhiana, while the two junior-most boys have joined the Government Sports School here and learning to dribble the ball.

The Jalandhar Plus team met the two generations of basketball players in the house of Arjuna Awardee Sajjan Singh Cheema at Ladhewali here this week and watched them discuss the game.

He recalled that the game was introduced in their family in 1970 by his elder brother, late Balkar Singh Cheema, a former international player with the Indian Army. “He was declared the best player of the Services twice and represented the team at Sri Lanka and Malaysia. He had also played in Indian team against Pakistan”, Sajjan Singh Cheema narrates his brother’s achievements.

His cousin, Kuldeep Singh Cheema, a player in the Border Security Force (BSF) team, followed suit four years later and played 22 events for the BSF, winning 14 golds, four silvers and one bronze at the All India Police Meet. He turned out to be the highest scorer in the international championship held at South Africa and remained in the limelight for 13 long years like his elder cousin. He was also declared the National All Star of the game in Bangalore in 1976.

Four years later, in 1978, Sajjan Singh Cheema too started putting baskets. After playing his first national championship in Jaipur, he went on to play Inter-University for the Guru Nanak Dev University, Asian Basketball Federation Championship, Asian Games and six international championships held in Seoul, Russia, Hong Kong, Bangkok, Singapore and Malaysia. He continued as the vice-captain of the team for a long time and also won the prestigious State Government Maharaja Ranjit Singh Award.

But one of the most memorable moments in the game for the three brothers has been the Asian Basketball Federation camp held at Calcutta in 1981 which they attended together. An even more cherished time was the national tournament held in Jaipur in which the trio was joined by Gurmeet Singh Cheema, Sajjan Singh’s younger brother. “People loved to watch Balkar Singh and Kuldeep Singh representing the Services pitted against Sajjan and me as a part of the police team,” Gurmeet Singh, now serving as an inspector with the Hoshiarpur police, said. He too has played an international event against a Russian team in New Delhi.

Sukhdev Singh Cheema, the younger brother of Kuldeep Singh Cheema, had also contributed to the game as a junior national, senior national and university player.

Since he was more interested in shooting, he is currently the in-charge of the shooting team of the Punjab Police. Hardeep Singh Cheema, the elder brother of Sajjan, too played inter-services for the Indian Army and is currently a coach with the MGN School in Kapurthala.

In fact, the entire family hails from Dabulian village in Kapurthala. The village has its own basketball stadium where the Cheema brothers once played against the Rest of Punjab and defeated them.

Vikramdeep Singh Cheema and Mandeep Singh Cheema, the sons of Kuldeep Singh Cheema, have already shot into limelight with gold medals at national tournaments, but both have left the country. Vikramdeep, a pass out of the National Institute of Technology, is in the US and Mandeep is studying in Australia.

Guneet Kaur Cheema, the daughter of Sajjan Singh and a student of the DAV Institute of Engineering and Technology, has played in the under-17 category at the national level and was adjudged the best player of the Punjab Technical University. But she too is able to spare little time for the game.

Jasmeet Cheema, Guneet’s brother, is more interested in shooting.

The most promising of the lads are Harvinder Singh Cheema, the son of Hardeep Singh, who has represented Punjab in the under-17 category and is presently taking training at Ludhiana; Charanjit Singh Cheema, Harvinder’s younger brother who has participated in a state championship as a Class VIII student of the Government Sports School; and Harpal Singh, the son of a sister of the Cheema brothers.

All eyes are on the newer lot, waiting for them grow taller and every time reach that lone basket in the court. 

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Earning livelihood from demonstrations
Deepkamal Kaur
Tribune News Service

The livelihood of this family depends on the number of demonstrations held in the city. Working with straw, waste paper and bamboo sticks, they carve out the most commonly used props for the protests organised in the city.

Almost all members of this joint family operating from their residence-cum-shop behind the Central Jail are engaged in making effigies. From the effigies of the Chief Minister to those of the local ministers, mayor and other political bigwigs, they have the expertise in making the look-alikes.

One just needs to hand over the photograph of the person whose effigy is to be made. The photograph has to be handed just two hours before the protest, and the work would be done with much perfection at a cost ranging between Rs 350 and Rs 450, depending on the expertise involved.

Mr Jeewan, popularly known as Lal, has been doing the business for almost the past one decade. His aged mother and younger brother, too, help him in the business. His wife and sister-in-law also lend their helping hand by attending customers, in case the men folk are away for some work.

The family is said to have earlier been involved in the same business in Old Delhi, from where they shifted to Jalandhar in the 1990s. The family members said that they were doing the business openly in Delhi, but here they had to be very alert as the policemen often kept a check on the effigies they made.

“We do not keep any sample of the effigy with us here for the same reason. You can get one by placing an order at least two hours in advance. Also an advance payment has to be made. Most Opposition parties, religious groups and unionists have been our customers for years,” they said.

The family is also engaged in selling glittery buntings that are often used for decorating streets or pathways during any religious ceremony or wedding function. This job is carried out by three ladies of the house and the grown-up children.

They make these buntings by cutting out shimmering paper in the shape of laces, making small tufts by tying up a few of these together with thread, and finally tying all tufts in a row over long plastic ropes that can be hung from one pole to the other.

“These buntings can also be used in another way,” said Mr Jeewan as he explained that these were also bought by school teachers for use as “pom-poms” made by arranging tufts tightly and then “winding” them on the wrists of students during various cultural functions. 

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Noise pollution? Only if you are not ‘party’ to it
Tribune News Service

With the year’s first marriage season going full throttle, many people in the city say they are searching for some relief now: not because of too many invitations but, as they add, because of too much noise.

Those who never got that coveted invitation or were too busy to spare time on social niceties had to bear amplified DJs rocking parties at the nearest marriage palace, kothi or bylane. And the rest of the “disturbance” was remixed with astronomically-priced firecrackers lighting up the sky every minute or two, sound-effects included.

“Too bad,” some residents say, adding: “How can the students study? How can the elderly sleep?” But then would they care if it was their cousin’s or nephew’s or friend’s daughter’s marriage and the same feet would be burning the temporary dance floors? Would they go and ask them to wind up the fun a bit early because the uninvited might be sleepless?

As for the rest of the time, the voice of protest remains their fundamental right. And why not? “The use of loud speakers goes beyond the stipulated hours despite restrictions imposed by the administration,” a housewife from Model Town, says. She said there should be a stricter implementation of the rules. But she refused to divulge what she would do if the same happens at a function she and her family was invited to.

Ms Gita, a homemaker from Saraswati Vihar, says her children are under severe pressure of the coming exams and loudspeakers installed at marriage palaces add to the tension. “The children find it hard to concentrate on their studies. I just want peace of mind to help my children study in a noise-free environment before their final exams,” she adds.

Prakash from Rajinder Nagar has another grievance: noise pollution affects the health of the elderly.

“My parents suffer from blood pressure and the night-long celebrations are affecting their health.”

Then there is another strange issue. Rajmeet Singh, a breeder from Mota Singh Nagar, says his pets are “dead scared and keep howling because of the loud noises.” No parties for animals. Sorry!

The administration, however, claims that measures are being taken to check the rise in noise pollution during the marriage season.

The police has already banned the bursting of fire crackers between 10 pm and 6 am and at weddings through the night.

This issue, assuming all those who went to such “loud” parties were not party to the pollution issue, also came up at the meeting of the committee, which redresses the grievances of the residents here on January 11. The meeting was headed by the SDM, Mr Mahinderpal Gupta.

The Deputy Commissioner, Mr Ashok Gupta, in his capacity as District Magistrate, ordered the strict implementation of the Supreme Court ruling in this regard.

Strange, such rules are never applicable in villages. Why? May be the entire village parties. 

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Say it with flowers on the D-day 
Anil Jerath
Tribune News Service

When it comes to floral arrangements at weddings, individuality rather than convention is the norm. And it is idiosyncratically stylish to be profligate at the weddings. At a recent wedding in Phagwara, a family is said to have splurged Rs 2 lakh just on floral arrangements.

This, however, was like peanuts when compared to a Phagwara-based family that spent approximately Rs 8 lakh on similar decorations at a wedding. Sure, a great way of saying it with florals!

Flowers constitute a subtle element that sets the tone and mood for wedding ceremonies. Wedding flowers follow fashion trends, says Ms Josan Kaur, a city-based businesswoman.

Used for adornment as well as for ceremonies, for garlands as well as for showering blessings, flowers form an integral part of any wedding, she adds.

The floral arrangements at a wedding are determined by various factors. Predominantly dictated by the season, and the overall ambience of a wedding, flowers lend a special charm to the wedding. “Beginning with the ring ceremony and invitation cards to the trousseau, cuisine, décor, props, entertainment and clothes, everything revolves around the chosen theme,” says Mr James Pubby, a florist. Gladiolus is outdated, while Orchid, Bird of Paradise and Cymbidiums are in.

“On most occasions, the flowers at the venue are planned to coordinate with the bride and bridegroom’s attire,” affirms Ms Josan.

For the opulent, the preference stops with the exotic. Bold and striking flower arrangements are taking over the traditionally romantic ones. When it comes to dramatic and distinctive designs, the hand-tied French twist bouquets incorporating bold ribbons, crystals and pearls make a striking statement.

Even for simpler, more intimate weddings, flowers can make a big statement, irrespective of the budget. From a modest Rs 20,000 to lakhs of rupees, the expenses could vary depending upon the client’s budget.

“During the wedding season, the demand for flowers goes up to 700-1,000 bunches per day,” says a city-based florist.

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What’s in a name?
Numerous shops, showrooms and even garages in this city of NRIs and wannabe NRIs carry names of foreign locales 
Deepkamal Kaur
Tribune News Service

Birmingham Car Garage, Dubai Jewellers, Singapore Emporium and the Cambridge International School for Girls. No, these are not the names of off-shore workshops, showrooms or institutions. These are all here in Jalandhar. Most of these have been started by the people who lived abroad for long and returned with bag and baggage to begin a new enterprise back home. Sometimes, those who yearn to move to greener pastures also go in for names with foreign connections.

The trend is unique to the city, where the “craze” for going abroad is the highest in the region. Signboards flashing the names of most common foreign destinations can be easily seen in most markets of the city.

Rainak Bazaar, perhaps, has the highest number of shops having the name of a foreign place. The market gets the maximum number of NRIs, who get lured by such names, feel the shopkeepers. In fact, at the very start of the market, such signboards can be seen on either side. On the left corner is Dubai Jewellers, on the right side towards the Old GT Road is the Singapore Emporium.

While the two showrooms are quite old in the city, a resident has recently opened a new car workshop by the name “Birmingham Car Garage” on the Garha Road. Says Mr Hardeep Singh, owner of the garage, “My cousin is settled in Birmingham. He was here at the time when I was to open the workshop and he suggested to me to open it by that name. The idea clicked with me and it was done.” He added, “The purpose was simply to keep a fancy name and nothing beyond it.”

The shop “Dubai Jewellers”, too, has a “Dubai link”. “The owner, Mr Shakti, has come from Dubai, where he continues to own jewellery shops,” said a saleswoman in the showroom.

The idea behind the opening of the Cambridge International School for Girls in Urban Estate here almost two years back was clearly to lure the parents who wanted to send their children abroad, revealed a member of the Jalandhar-based Hans Raj Memorial Education Society.

“Doabans have always wanted to give their children an international experience and this is exactly what we do,” he said, adding that the school was linked with Cambridge University and students completing their senior secondary education were not required to clear IELTS or TOEFL before getting a direct admission to Cambridge University. 

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The singer and the poet
J.S. Gandam

Makhan Loharanwala and Jazzy B
Makhan Loharanwala and Jazzy B

It was a rare treat for music lovers with the singer of the hit song “Naag Sahmbh Lai Zulfan De” and its lyricist came together again. It was Jazzy B and the California-based lyricist, Mr Makhan Loharanwala, and the occasion was a “Sanman Samaroh” organised by the Punjabi Kala and Sahit Kendar, Phagwara, and the Punjabi monthly magazine “Sangeet Darpan” here on Thursday.

In an exclusive conversation, Mr Makhan Loharanwala, who had so far penned 250 songs, maintained that folk was divine. “I did not have any hunch that the song would become so much popular when I had written it,” he said.

“But later it became my ‘pehchan’ rather a surname, as people started addressing me as Makhan Naag Sahmbh Laiwala,” he said, with a smile. “I write by diving deep into my heart and soul,” he remarked. “I do not think about who would sing my lyrics,” he said.

He also admits that since Jazzy is a singer, his face is more visible and therefore, more popular than his. On this, Jazzy B was quick to interject, as he said that the beauty of the wordings of the song was behind his success. “Voice of the singer and the music did matter much, but it is the beauty of wordings that mattered most,” remarked Jazzy.

Emigrated to America in 1999 from his native village Loharan near Goraya, Mr Loharanwala disclosed that he was fond of writing since childhood.

“My book, titled ‘Naag Sahmbh Lai Zulfan De,’ with 100 songs, would be released soon,” he said.

“People find my songs very cultural and clean, which could be heard together with all family members,” he said, adding that, “My songs ‘Chhahan Di Kuriye’, ‘Garib Ditta Maar Ni’, have also been a hit among the people.”

He called upon his fellow lyricists to pen down the constructive songs which could showcase the clean and rich culture of Punjab. “Vulgar writings should be discouraged,” he added.

Jazzy B also asserted that he sung out from his heart. “Andron gayiye tan liv lagdi, scene khichya janda, jadu hunda (If sung deep down from heart, one becomes one with the divine, graphic picture obtains and a spell is cast),” B said in a typical Jazzian style.

He disclosed that he had sung a solo “Chuk De Punjabi Bale Balle Bolda” in Sunny Deol-Preity Zinta starrer Hindi film “Teesri Aankh”, directed by Harry Baweja.

“His new album, ‘Collaboration’, was also coming out next month,” he disclosed. “In the album, I have sung duet songs with Sukhjinder Shinda, Gurdas Maan, A.S. Kang, Pakistani singer Abrar Aulakh,” he said. “It would be simultaneously released all over the world,” he said.

So far, Jazzy has given ten albums, including two religious ones. His next album was under the making. He said he liked folk songs.

“But, we have to change with the changing times,” he added. “Sometimes singing gets demand-oriented and era-specific”, he maintained.

When asked if he justified nudity and obscenity in videos, Jazzy said he did not do so, but added that “vulgarity lies in the eyes of the beholder.”

“Now we wear jeans and shirts, not suits,” he quipped to drive home his point of changing with the times.

Jazzy termed the honouring of Loharanwala as an honour of clean Punjabi writings and singing.

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‘Punjaban Mutiyaar’ keeps the culture alive
Arun Sharma
Tribune News Service

College-going students competing to show their expertise at a spinning wheel, girls preparing flour with manual “chakki” and weaving “Phulkari” — the Punjaban Mutiyaar contest to be held during the “Punjabi Sabhyacharak Pidh,” to be organised in Kapurthala in the last week of February, would provide an opportunity to girls to show their talents and artistic skills.

The girls from the city would have to qualify four rounds during the contest. All rounds in the competition have been planned to assess how the modern girls could preserve their ethnic culture, and excel in household chores.

In the first round, the participants would exhibit their dancing skills. The second question-answer round would test the aspirants’ knowledge about the Punjabi culture. In the third round, the girls would get a chance to demonstrate their interest in any one of the arts like mono-acting, singing, histrionics, and mimicry, which would be presented on the stage for one minute. The fourth round would assess the expertise of the participants in the household chores.

The winner of the contest would be awarded a gold “saggi” (an ornament to be worn on head) along with a trophy. The first runner-up and the second runner-up would be given a silver “saggi” and trophy.

Besides, prizes could also be won by the participants in various categories like “saroo varga kadh”, “tunehari akh”, “gidhian di rani”, “taur panjaban di”, “sohna haassa”.

Elaborating on the objective of holding the contest, Mr Bikramjit Bikki, general secretary of the Punjabi Sabhyacharak Pidh, Kapurthala, said that the Pidh had taken the initiative to convey the message to the society that female foeticide should not be done as a girl child was a treasure. “This contest is an effort to make the girls more confident and also make them feel that they are the keepers of culture,” he added.

Incidentally, the winner of the Punjaban Mutiyaar, 1999, Ms Sandeep Kaur, was successful in getting a break in films. Ms Manpreet Kaur, the winner in 2004, got a direct entry in the World Punjaban Mutiyaar contest.

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The ‘saas bahu’ of kids
With a surfeit of cartoon channels, children in the city have found their own escape route
Anita D. Mahajan
Tribune News Service

“When would Bob the Builder come and repair our roads?,” six-year-old Rohan often asks his father while they travel on the bumpy roads of the city of Jalandhar. “Bob the Builder”, “Pokemon”, “Scooby Doo”, and “Powerpuff Girls” and many others are a rage in the households with a TV and children. A quick bite of Tom & Jerry as the mother makes the kid swallow cornflakes or paranthas or after school when they throw away the heavy bags and search for the TV remote, cup their chins in their hands and enter the realms of fantasy made real.

“Watching cartoons has become an obsession with children,” Ms Kamalpreet Kaur, a mother of two children, says. “Today’s kids are so engrossed with toons and animation that they usually imitate the styles of these characters. Many a times, they also keep their parents engaged with queries after watching a cartoon serial.” She adds that sometimes even parents cannot avoid accompanying their kids in watching TV. “We also find these appealing.”

“Noddy, Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and Tom & Jerry are the all-time favourites with kids and youngsters,” she adds.

With the coming of a number of 24-hour cartoon channels, there has been a conspicuous increase in the viewing of cartoons among children. Most of them devote two-three hours daily on cartoons, but parents and child psychologists opine that around one hour of viewing is ideal. Earlier it used to be the creations of Walt Disney, but nowadays, its Japanese cartoons or anime that is pulling children, the leader being Nintendo.

“Viewing cartoons for long hours has side-effects like obesity and stress on eyes. The kids instill fighting habits like their cartoon heroes from these serials,” Ms Kalpana Bhaskar, a teacher in Mayor World School, says. She is also a mother of two. “But completely abstaining from cartoons is also not fare,” she adds.

Experts say animation is entertainment, and it can be educative too. “Through these characters, we can teach our children about modern concepts and technologies. Many of the cartoon serials inspire children to eat a healthy diet like green vegetables and fruits,” Mr Kulwinder Chawla, a businessman, with two kids, says. “Besides, most of the cartoons are based on the theme of victory of the good over the bad.”

He said sometimes social and cultural topics become more interesting for kids when it is transformed into the toon language. “The recent animated movies on Ramayana and Hanuman were popular among the children,” he adds.

However, experts advocate parental guidance in this field too. “It’s the adults who can control the harmful effects of excessive viewing. If parents show enthusiasm in accompanying their kids while watching their favourite serials, there wouldn’t be any worries,” Ms Kalpana Bhaskar says. “Moreover, the kids themselves are conscious towards their studies.”

“I like Barbie movies, but I do not watch too much TV these days, as exams are near,” 11-year-old Rhea, says. Ms Kamalpreet Kaur says that as these serials are telecast in Hindi, they are more popular.

Another dimension to the toon world is its commercial aspect which benefits a number of companies.

“Many have tied up with cartoon channels to make their products popular through the serials, like Beyblades, which is the latest craze among children,” Mr Surinder Singh, a resident of Urban Estate Phase 1, says.

While the mothers are hooked on to the “saas bahu” serials, the children have found their own escape. And the one cannot blame the other.

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Playing a good Samaritan
Minna Zutshi
Tribune News Service

Playing a Good Samaritan is not always an easy job. It can be mistaken to be a misplaced sympathy or even a patronizing attitude. But these dampeners have not affected Mr Michael Sehgal, a Newcastle-based NRI, who has taken upon himself to sponsor a student every year to Northumbria University in the United Kingdom.

Mr Sehgal, who is in the city these days, said that he wanted to give his bit to his native land.

“Decades ago, when we shifted to the United Kingdom, life was not so easy. We had to prioritise things and it entailed some sacrifices, too. Today, looking back over all those years, I feel that I must give something back to my country. I owe a lot to my native land,” he said.

“The formalities for the sponsorship are being completed. But I am sure a really deserving student would get this chance to study abroad,” he said.

Incidentally, he has been honoured with an MBE (Member of British Empire) by the British royalty.

“There are so many things that we can learn from the people of the United Kingdom. For one, the work culture there is remarkable. And there are no bureaucratic hassles,” he said.

However, he has a deep and abiding respect for the Indian culture. “The close kinship ties of Indians are remarkable. We believe in togetherness and therein lies our strength,” he added.

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Seminar on socio-economic paradigms
Tribune News Service

The Department of History and Sociology, Hans Raj Mahila Maha Vidyalaya, organised a seminar on ‘Changing socio-economic paradigms in the north-western region’ on last Saturday. Dr Pam Rajput, Executive Director, Women Resources and Advocacy Centre, Chandigarh, spoke on various socio-economic issues such as the declining sex ratio, NRI marriages, consumerist culture, crime against women and privatisation of education.

Prof S.K. Goyal, Vice-chairman and Professor Emeritus, Institute of Studies in Industrial Development, New Delhi, emphasised on the need to look at various socio-economic problems at a national level.

Dr Inder Pal Singh, former Pro-Vice Chancellor, Guru Nanak Dev University, was the chief guest during opening of the seminar.

Dr D.R. Vij, former Dean, College Development Council of Punjabi University, and former Principal, Government College of Education, Jalandhar, was the chief guest during valedictory function.

Dr S.L. Sharma, Course Director, Institute of Co-relation Administration, Chandigarh, chaired the post lunch session. Ms P.P. Sharma, Principal of the host college, welcomed all the guests.

Ms Saroj Sharma, Head of the Department of History, coordinated the seminar.

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Cultural programmes organised
Tribune News Service

A cultural programme was organised by the Department of Punjabi, Government Arts and Sports College, on Saturday. Two Canada-based Indian artists, Supanpreet and Rajesh Raju, shared their experiences with the students even as they sang songs to entertain them.

On this occasion, Prof Waryam Singh Sandhu, a well-known short story writer in Punjabi, also interacted with the students.

Ms Karamjeet Kaur, Principal, was also present on the occasion.

Meanwhile, Hans Raj Mahila Maha Vidyalaya organised its annual fete on Sunday.

Stalls of eatables, games, swings and raffle draw were set up for the visitors.

The students danced to tune of their favourite songs.

The chief guest on the occasion was Mr Kanwaljit Singh Lally, MLA and Chairman of Sugarfed.

He announced a grant of Rs 50,000 to the college. Amrinder Gill, folk singer, enthralled the audience with his melodious rendering of Punjabi numbers. Teji Sandhu, another artiste, entertained the audience with his songs.

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Students bid adieu to seniors
Tribune News Service

The Plus One students of Police DAV Public School bid adieu to Plus Two students on Wednesday. The cultural function began with a welcome address by Vishesh, anchor of the show. Dance items were presented by Ishita, Vatsalaya and Nishant.

Games filled the atmosphere with fun. A modelling show was presented by the Plus Two students.

Hemant Dutta was chosen as “Mr Police DAV” and Raminder Kaur was selected as “Ms Police DAV”. Karan clinched “Mr Smart” title, while “Ms Smart” title went to Surbhi.

A delegation of teachers from the UK under a Teachers’ International Professional Development programme visited Police DAV Public School on Thursday.

They studied the educational techniques and curriculum followed by the school. Dr Rashmi Vij, Principal, gave a presentation on ‘Educational set up in India’. 

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Amjad Ali Khan to perform today
Tribune News Service

There’s good news for music enthusiasts. Ustad Amjad Ali Khan and his two sons, Ayaan and Amaan Ali Bangash, would perform on Friday in the “Peace & Serenity” concert at the Red Cross Bhavan here.

Sarod has been given a new interpretation by Amjad Ali Khan. Khan. The programme would showcase the brilliance of this sarod maestro. Also, the audience would have a chance to listen to his sons, who are musicians in their own right. The evening promises to be a musical treat for the city. 

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Lecture on ‘Knowledge Management’

Dr Suresh Chadha, Professor, University Business School, Panjab University, delivered a lecture on “Knowledge Management” at the Apeejay College of Fine Arts on last Friday. He gave a motto that knowledge is power and gave the message of improving knowledge base through its sharing.

He said the academic achievements must be supplemented by latest information for getting better opportunities in life. He insisted on reading articles, journals and internet for enhancing knowledge. Ms Vandana Gautam, Head of Commerce Department, was present on the occasion. — TNS

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Market Buzz

Club Cabana is coming up in the vicinity of Jalandhar. Spread over 17 acres of lush greenery, the club, with the state-of-the-art facilities, including spa, gymnasium, therapy rooms, offers a lot to its members, claims the club’s spokesperson.

“With theme restaurants, a pub and a lounge at the club, it is a wonderful experience to be here. The members can choose from a variety of cuisines. Even the ambience of the restaurants has been carefully planned to enhance the experience,” claims the spokesperson.

According to the club spokesperson, the tranquil atmosphere in the midst of nature adds to the charm. Sprawling lush lawns, badminton courts, squash courts, tennis courts, basketball courts, billiards and snooker room, gorgeous cottages along a beautiful lake, apart from super-deluxe suites overlooking a beautiful landscape — the club promises the members an exhilarating experience.

The other highlights of the club, according to the club spokesperson, are the hi-tech business centre that offers wireless internet and video-conferencing facilities, crèche facility for couples wanting to spend quality time alone, beauty parlours, men saloons, mediation centres, cyber café, library and private helipad.

“The spa at the club offers 300 different treatments from the world over. The club has been designed not only to accommodate facilities for physically challenged, but also it is eco-friendly,” adds the spokesperson of the club.

Diamond Mela: Offering a new collection of diamond jewellery, Tanishq has organise a “Solitaire Mela” at its showroom in Jalandhar. The mela, started from Wednesday onwards, is showcasing over 30 items of diamond jewellery that include a rare 5 carat diamond. Mr Mayank Kampani, Punjab Region Head, Tanishq, in a press release, said “We are sure that this mela will bring pure joy to our customers who wish to make this festive season memorable.”

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Passing Thru

Ramneek Paintal
Ramneek Paintal, anchor and grooming expert

What’s your impression of the city?

It’s vibrant and teeming with life. It has a certain charm about it. And it makes me feel at home. My childhood was spent in Kapurthala. So, it’s more of a homecoming here.

Is modelling all about looks?

It is about looks and it is also about attitude. But over the years, the idea of beauty has undergone a change. Traditionally, the glamour world has been kinder to fair-skinned girls. But now things have changed. Dusky girls are doing quite well. And that’s heartening.

Did Bollywood never hold any attraction for you?

I will be honest. There’s no point in doing C-grade movies. It is better to be a big fish in a small pond than to be a small fish that gets lost in a big pond!

— Minna Zutshi

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Calligraphy

A calligraphy competition was organised in pre-primary wing of Seth Hukum Chand SD Public Senior Secondary School, Kapurthala Road, in Jalandhar. The students used different styles to write a passage given to them. Ms Manju Arora, Principal, gave prizes to the winners.

Media fest

The students of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, the Regional Campus of Guru Nanak Dev University, Ladhewali, would organise a media fest, Bon Jour, on March 3. The students from various institutions and media persons from the region are expected to attend the festival. The department will also release the second edition of their souvenir, Crescendo, on the same day, which will include write-ups of well-known personalities from various fields.

Workshop

The Business Club of the Department of Commerce and Business Administration, Lyallpur Khalsa College, organised a workshop on “Computerised Accounting” for the final year students of commerce on Wednesday. Prof G.K. Jain, Head of Department of Commerce, showed how computerised accounting was made easy with the latest versions of “Tally 7.2 programme”.

Show

Three students of the Kanya Maha Vidyalaya have won in the “30 sawal” programme being telecast by the Jalandhar Doordarshan. Vandana, Neha and Leesha, the winners of the show, were congratulated by Ms Gurjot Kaur, Head of the Department of Social Sciences, and Ms Rita Bawa, Principal. (Compiled by Deepkamal Kaur)

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