SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI

           J A L A N D H A R

Every Friday

A pat for pets
Shrinks say they are the best bet when it comes to relaxation. Spending even half an hour with them is cathartic. Those with religious inclination look for some kind of spiritual atonement in caring for them.

Children find this mother-daughter duo of miniature Pinschers perfect playmates A dog-breeder trains his German Shepherd.
Four Friends: Children find this mother-daughter duo of miniature Pinschers perfect playmates
Big is Beautiful: A dog-breeder trains his German Shepherd.

— Tribune photos by Pawan Sharma



EARLIER EDITIONS

THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS

Serpentine queues are a routine affair at the Suwidha Centre of the District Administrative Complex, Jalandhar Vehicle registration: An inconvenient job at Suwidha Centre
Long queues, single counter, no specified instructions and repeated visits. You will have to bear with such inconveniences, in case, you have just bought a new vehicle and want to get it registered at Suwidha Centre of the district administrative complex.

Serpentine queues are a routine affair at the Suwidha Centre of the District Administrative Complex, Jalandhar. — Tribune photo by Pawan Sharma

Winners of Miss Farewell contest organised at the Prem Chand Markanda SD College for Women, Jalandhar.
Party time
: Winners of Miss Farewell contest organised at the Prem Chand Markanda SD College for Women, Jalandhar.
— Photo by S.S. Chopra 

 Students of KMV College, Jalandhar, at their patriotic best.
Students of KMV College, Jalandhar, at their patriotic best. — Photo by S.S. Chopra

Learning communication skills through ‘navras’
Parents and educators from various schools participated in two workshops organised at Eklavya School, Model Town, on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Lights, camera, action Retake!
For five anxious groups of budding film makers, it was a dream come true after their hurriedly-made short films were not only screened on a big screen but also appreciated by noted film experts, during a valedictory function of the Indian Institute of Film and Media Arts at the Red Cross Bhawan here on Tuesday.

Career counselling gaining popularity
When it comes to choosing a career, one does not want to take any chances.

No takers for brass bands, orchestras
There was a time when one could not imagine a “baarat” without a brass band and a marriage party without an orchestra. These were the highlight of any typical Indian marriage.

Tracing women’s journey from bondage to freedom
For 35 minutes, “Chidi Di Ambar Wal Udaan”— an one actor poetic play, staged recently by Suchetak Rang Manch, Mohali, at the local Guru Nanak College, mesmerised the audience.

Workshop for teachers
Guru Amar Dass Public School organised an accountancy workshop for 50 teachers of Plus One and Two from various local schools.

Over 500 students awarded degrees
Over 500 students were conferred degrees on the occasion of annual convocation of the Prem Chand Markanda SD College for Women recently.

Jonathan Beck, a US-based scientist who was on a visit to JalandharYouthspeak
‘Jalandharis are warm and friendly’

“The city has a unique charm. It is vibrant and it is rich culturally. Unlike in the West where individualism is the way of life, people here are ready to help you out even before you ask for it.

Jonathan Beck, a US-based scientist who was on a visit to Jalandhar

The dispensary at Shree Satya Narayan Mandir, Kapurthala, caters to over 200 patients daily. Dispensary for the poor
In March 1992, this free allopathic dispensary in Kapurthala began with a doctor and a dispenser. In the last 14 years, Swami Mukand Hari Dharmarth Aushdhalya at Shree Satya Narayan Mandir has grown to the size of a mini-hospital with an OPD that handles daily an average of over 200 patients.

The dispensary at Shree Satya Narayan Mandir, Kapurthala, caters to over 200 patients daily.
— Tribune photo by Pawan Sharma

From Schools and Colleges
The annual sports meet of Guru Nanak Dev University College, Basti Nau, was held on Saturday. The function began with the unfurling of the national flag by Mr Ashok Gupta, Deputy Commissioner. He gave prizes to the winners of various events.

Market Buzz
A wide range of hand-painted unstitched suits, sarees, dupattas, stoles with sequins work would be displayed at an exhibition-cum-sale event by “Bugli’s Creations” at Hotel Shangrila at New Jawahar Nagar in Jalandhar on Saturday.

Tiny tots take part in ‘Graduation Ceremony’
Tiny tots from CT Public School took part in a “Graduation Ceremony” recently. Students presented a cultural show. Mr Manbir Singh, Chairman, Ms Lakhwinder Kaur, Principal, and Ms Nidhi Ghai, in charge of pre-primary wing, were also present on the occasion.
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A pat for pets

The city is fast becoming the hub of dog-breeders and pet lovers, finds out Minna Zutshi

Shrinks say they are the best bet when it comes to relaxation. Spending even half an hour with them is cathartic. Those with religious inclination look for some kind of spiritual atonement in caring for them. Children find them good, albeit sometimes naughty, companions. But talk to a pet owner and the answer invariably is that pets give a new perspective on life. 

Style ‘unleashed’

If you thought that pet-care was an easy job, take a reality check. It’s not just leashes and harnesses that you require. You need much more. Pets like to have it all in style. Paw care products, food supplements, odour remover, beds, mats, toys (balls, and chew, fetch and pull toys, catnip toys), scratching posts, shampoos, brushes, deodorants — you may have to spend a fortune to keep your pet in good humour! 

“Eyes shining with implicit trust and a tail that is ready to wag at the hint of joy — I need not ask for anything more. When I am tense and my dog ‘Cliff’ sits near my feet, my worries start ebbing away,” remarks Arshdeep, a Plus Two student.

Pet lovers say the unconditional trust of the pets makes them adorable. “I have a Labrador that is quite intelligent. Though sometimes, it does throw a tantrum or two when all alone, I know a bit of reassurance on my part is all it needs,” sallies Madanjot Kaur, a young professional.

For Arshdeep Rayat, BCA II student of Saint Soldiers Management and Technical Institute, keeping “Tuffy” as his pet has been one of the best things he has ever done. “Tuffy is a gourmet when it comes to ladoos. Mention the word ‘ladoo’ and he comes running at a speed that would shame Olympic champions,” he explains.

Many NRIs, too, have their pets waiting for them back home. Mr Ram Singh Dhesi from Lambran village says that when he returns from the UK, his pet Gauri greets him with affection that would rival that of a child.

Not surprisingly, dog-breeders are cashing in on this ‘pet craze’. “Eight years ago when I joined this business, it was different. Today, pet-keeping has become the latest fad. Labradors, German Shepherd and Pugs are the most favourite dogs,” says Mr Gaurav Singh Hoon, a dog- breeder.

He adds that Poodles are also getting popular, though Pugs (thanks to their Hutch connection) are considered the cutest. “Even in the choice of the pets, media publicity counts a lot. I am sure if there’s an ad featuring a Poodle, people will start asking for Poodles,” he reasons.

Interestingly, cats are yet to catch the city residents’ fancy. Seemingly, people still are superstitious about a cat’s proverbial nine lives. And unconventional pets like goldfish are a rarity in the city.

Perhaps, dogs, with their perfect obedience stance, make all-time favourite pets! 

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Vehicle registration: An inconvenient job at Suwidha Centre
Deepkamal Kaur
Tribune News Service

Long queues, single counter, no specified instructions and repeated visits. You will have to bear with such inconveniences, in case, you have just bought a new vehicle and want to get it registered at Suwidha Centre of the district administrative complex.

Applicants start queuing up at 8:30 am in an uncovered area of the centre, at least half an hour before any officer turns up to sit down under a tree. There is neither any seating arrangement and nor any supply of drinking water around the place. The applicants said they had to stand in the long queue for two to three hours before it was their turn to get a registration number.

Mr Manohar Singh, another resident, said that instead of adding any “suwidha” for them, the administration was trying to harass them by making no seating provision at the spot. “We know that the building of the centre is still under construction, but some chairs or benches could have been kept around the place for our comfort. If not that, there could have been more counters so that the work went on smoothly. With summers approaching, it would be really uncomfortable for visitors to stand here for so long in the sun without water,” he complained.

The visitors said that since the procedure to apply for vehicle registration was not mentioned anywhere by the authorities, they often missed to bring one or the other document. Mr Gurminder Singh from Chak Bindal village in Nakodar said he had stood in the queue for two hours with his application a few days back. “Finally, when I got my turn, I presented to them a set of attested copies of documents, including ration card and driving licence. I was then told to bring an attested copy of the bill for the purchase of my motorcycle, too, for which I had to go back home,” he explained.

Mr Harjit from Chogarian village said that he, too, had stood in the line at 9:15 am, but when he got his turn at 11 am, he was told to get the chassis number traced on his application. “So, I had to again get out of the line, do the job and queue up all over again. I do not know whether I will be able to manage to get my turn today for the registration numbers are given till 1 pm only”, he said.

The officer on duty, who apparently had no time to talk, said the rush had been too much in the past few days due to closing of the financial year. “People are on a buying spree for they believe that new taxes would be imposed from April 1 onwards,” he said, adding that the rush would settle down soon.

Mr Jasbir Singh, DTO, was not available and his cell phone was switched off. Mr Ashok K. Gupta, Deputy Commissioner, too could not be contacted, as his phone too remained off. 

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Learning communication skills through ‘navras’
Deepkamal Kaur
Tribune News Service

Parents and educators from various schools participated in two workshops organised at Eklavya School, Model Town, on Tuesday and Wednesday.

A workshop on “Family relationships” was organised on Tuesday and another on “Use of theatre in education” were organised on Wednesday.

Conducting the first workshop, Ms Pallavi Khanna, a consultant for psychological and behavioural problems for children, focussed on inter-personal relationships and dynamics within a family structure. Addressing the participants during the second workshop, Ms Simi Srivastava, a theatre artist, stressed that communication skills of children could be enhanced with the help of theatre, creative movements, music and dance.

An interesting activity pertained to ‘navras’, in which the participants had to express anger, affection, shock, fear and disgust through facial expressions, sounds and dialogues. Ms Seema Handa, Director of the school, said that the participants had found the tips useful. 

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Lights, camera, action Retake!
Varinder Singh
Tribune News Service

For five anxious groups of budding film makers, it was a dream come true after their hurriedly-made short films were not only screened on a big screen but also appreciated by noted film experts, during a valedictory function of the Indian Institute of Film and Media Arts (IAFMA) at the Red Cross Bhawan here on Tuesday.

Over 50 students from across the state after putting up with one week of lectures, screenings, trivia and constant curiosity to learn the art of film making from film makers, including Shaji. N. Karun, Sukhwant Dhadda, Anurag Singh and Dr Harjit Singh, finally put across their thoughts on the screen.

The results were boring, exciting, tacky, hilarious, and dramatic.

The students tried their hands on diverse themes, ranging from social issues such as the drug menace (“Burning Candles”) and female foeticide (“Hathaan Di Lakiran”). The other topics were one comedy (“Fukra: The Real Hero”), drama (“Pratishodh”) and a rags to riches story (“Parwaaz”). The participants not only acted in the films, but also handled all production jobs in film making: from being spot boy to directors.

Between sessions of tea at a stall and some frequent technical goof-ups, the participants dreamed and shared ideas to bring a change. One was working in a pharmaceutical company, one ran an advertising agency, many were students of local colleges, and a few were from the media itself. Interestingly, Navneet Kaur, a student of MA from Ludhiana, who conceptualised and directed “Pratishodh” said her aim was make it big in the electronic media. Her female protagonist in the seven-minute film, Ruchika, said she was there because she loved acting.

Though most of the participants said they were not sure about the outcome of their maiden ventures, their expressions indicated that they were largely successful in conveying the message.

“It was an inspiring experience. I used to watch films from the view of the audience. Now, I would be able to see a film from a the reel angle,” Mr Sarbjit Singh, on of the participants, said. An engineer by profession, he used to come all the way from Amritsar to attend the workshop.

Later in the evening, all the students were given certificates by Dr Swaran Singh, Commissioner, Jalandhar Division. 

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Career counselling gaining popularity
Anita D Mahajan
Tribune News Service

When it comes to choosing a career, one does not want to take any chances. And nowadays, even school students are seeking guidance and counselling to choose a stream they want their career to flow with.

With the scope of employment opportunities widening and new market trends emerging, career counselling is suddenly becoming important.

Career counsellor, Ms Gauri Chhabra, who is also a PGT (English) in Police DAV Public School here, says, “Factors like the coming of new fields and new courses, peer pressure and their expectations make it difficult for the student to choose a suitable career. They cannot even afford to maintain an information base of options available in the market.”

She adds that many a time, students themselves do not know about their capabilities, aptitude and interests. “Thus, seeking a counsellor’s guidance has become a necessity for youngsters and job seekers.”

Career counselling is a popular concept in Europe and America. “It gained momentum in India after increasing unemployment among the educated youths,” Ms Shweta Mehta, a teacher from Cambridge School, says.

Experts say a counsellor’s guidance should be sought during school days itself, preferably in Classes VIII and IX, as this would help the students in paying attention towards a particular field from the very beginning.

Ms Chhabra says, “In many cities, schools have come forward to help the students by providing career guidance to the students. Through the guidance, the students are inspired to mentally prepare themselves for their careers.”

She says a career counsellor helps students evaluate their abilities, interests, talents, and personality characteristics to develop realistic academic and career goals. “They inform them about the available range of career options, which are generally unknown, after exploring and analysing the student’s education, interests, skills and personal traits.”

For evaluating aptitude, the students go through various kinds of tests based on general knowledge.

On the basis of the score, the counsellor tries to understand the candidate’s general perception and interests, and guides him accordingly.

“Parents are advised not to put pressure on their wards to chose a particular stream,” Ms Mehta says.

“In majority of cases, parents decide the career of their children. Without trying to know about their ward’s interest, they force their children to follow their decisions. Parents need to be convinced to let their wards decide for themselves,” she adds.

On the emerging job opportunities, experts say the career marketplace is changing. “IT has created new jobs and altered the existing ones. Fields like biotechnology, IT, insurance, retailing, healthcare, visual communication design, hotel and tourism and pharmaceuticals are among the favourites in the market,” Ms Chhabra says.

“Without taking a blind decision on choosing a career, students, parents and teachers should first thoroughly analyse the job markets trends, as career decisions are generally irrevocable,” she adds.

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No takers for brass bands, orchestras
Anil Jerath
Tribune News Service

There was a time when one could not imagine a “baarat” without a brass band and a marriage party without an orchestra. These were the highlight of any typical Indian marriage.

Bookings used to be done well in advance to get the best band and orchestra of the city to regale guests on the wedding day.

With the changing tides of the time, orchestras have more or less disappeared and have been replaced by Disc Jockeys.

But the brass bands are still surviving, albeit with difficulty.

Mahesh, who runs Ricky Musical Group here, says, “I have been into this field for about 10 years. Orchestras were regular in marriage parties earlier, but with the coming of the DJ systems in the past five years, there is hardly any demand left for live musical groups.” He adds that many local artists have lost their livelihood and are looking for alternate careers. “Some of them now earn a living with paltry jobs.”

Pompous marriages have been an integral part of the country’s cultural heritage, as it has always acted as the carrier of age-old customs and rituals. The “ghori” (female horse), the shehnai and a royal band have been important traditions of any traditional Hindu marriage. However, these traditions are losing their grounds now.

Orchestra, which used to be the added attraction of a function, is vanishing.

“A few people, who are hiring brass bands today, are doing it out of formality; business, as such, has been greatly affected in the region,” Sharan, who owns Disco Orchestra and Brass Band here, says. “We are one of the remaining of the small number who still provide an orchestra, but its hard to find takers.”

He says an orchestra employs a good number of people and is therefore expensive, while people get DJ for a small amount.

Karamveer, a local singer who is now doing a job as an interior decorator, says, “In those heydays, we didn’t even have enough time to sleep because of regular shows for marriages and other parties. Now we wait to be called.” Leaving the more talented to play in the hotels, some of them have been compelled to be part of “jagran tolis”.

But Raj Shetty, Chief Advisor of the Punjab Orchestra Association, who also runs the Dazzle Brass Band here, has a different view, “It will not be true to say that the tradition of engaging bands in parties is dying. With the rise in the number of small families, people have the capacity and the desire to spend lavishly on marriages.

In fact, people now want to follow all customs. They want to have “baggi” (a chariot), a “palki” and a good band.”

He says that it is only competition and the lack of skill which is killing the small-time bands.

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Tracing women’s journey from bondage to freedom
J.S. Gandam

For 35 minutes, “Chidi Di Ambar Wal Udaan”— an one actor poetic play, staged recently by Suchetak Rang Manch, Mohali, at the local Guru Nanak College, mesmerised the audience.

Two NRIs among the audience, Mr Gurdarshan Singh Basra, and Mr Mangat Singh Salh, were so impressed by the play that they gave a cash reward of Rs 1,600 to its performer on the spot.

The young artiste Anita Shabdeesh who was the lone performer in this new-genre of theatre, told Jalandar Plus that she had so far given 45 performance of this “Ik paatri kaav-natak” (one actor poetic play) in India and abroad.

The play, a modified form of the dramatic monologue and opera, highlights the issue of female foeticide, portrays the plight of women and eventually presents the fairer sex as breaking the socio-religious shackles of the patriarchic society.

Anita said she had staged the play in the UK, US and Canada. She agreed with the suggestion that the message of the play was a bit loud and propagandist, but added in the same breath that the message of protest had to be loud.

She declared that her mission was to give 200 performances of the play, especially in colleges, in order to mobilise and awaken youths against the social evil of female foeticide and for giving space to women for demographic balance and social harmony.

When asked if the literary and metaphoric language of the play clicked among audience, especially the rural folks, she claimed that she had performed at Jallalabad village and had held the audience spellbound.

Anita said that in the UK, an elderly woman came to her after the show and said it had altered her attitude towards the girl child.

She admitted that at a few places, the revolting references to Ram, Gautam and Inder had invited objections. “But when I reasoned out the matter, those who had objected to it returned convinced,” she claimed.

The play was based on the poems of Madam Gurminder Sidhu. Its script was written by Punjabi poet Shabdeesh, Anita’s husband.

Hitherto, the one-act plays were the traditional genre of theatre but this play was a new experiment and a new experience for the students.

Collar mike, cage, shawl and music were used as dramatic devices and stage properties. “Chidi” (sparrow) symbolised the enslaved girl child, while her skyward flight symbolised her liberation from the bonds and shackles.

The lone protagonist revolted in the end by declaring that she disowned traditional heroes like Gautam, Inder and even Lord Ram, and rather demanded an open sky and the earth as her historical journey was from Draupadi to Phullan and Seema Biswas.

The troupe also staged another play, “Eh Lahoo Kis Da Hai”, written by Dr Gursharan Singh which touched the familiar theme of Guru Nanak taking the ordinary meal of worker Bhai Lalo and rejecting the sumptuous food of rich Malik Bhago. 

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Workshop for teachers
Tribune News Service

Guru Amar Dass Public School organised an accountancy workshop for 50 teachers of Plus One and Two from various local schools.

Mr Rakesh Khosla, faculty member from the Northern India Regional Council of Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, was the resource person. Mr Tarlochan Singh, Principal, stressed on the development of teaching faculty through various trainings.

Meanwhile, Euro Kids celebrated its annual day function at Mayor World School on Tuesday. The tiny tots gave a spectacular performance as they created a beautiful world of “Rainbow land”.

Ms Neerza Mayor, director, welcomed all parents and guests. Ms Mouna Prehar, founder principal, spoke about role of mother in shaping child’s development. Ms Neha Ratti, centre head, read out the annual report.

Meanwhile, Tiffin Sharing Day was organised at the Seth Hukum Chand SD Public Senior Secondary School on Monday. The main purpose of the event was to inculcate a feeling of love and sharing. The students brought different dishes and shared it with each other, said Ms Manju Arora, Principal. 

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Over 500 students awarded degrees
Tribune News Service

Over 500 students were conferred degrees on the occasion of annual convocation of the Prem Chand Markanda SD College for Women recently.

Prof V.N. Rajasekhraran Pillai, Vice-chairman of the University Grants Commission, was the chief guest. As many as 341 students were also awarded prizes on the occasion. Jagjit and Sakshi got the ‘best scholar’ prize. Sakshi Mehta won the “All-round best student” award.

Meanwhile, over 400 students of the Apeejay College of Fine Arts were distributed prizes during their annual function held on Sunday. Mr Surinder Singla, Finance Minister, Punjab, presided over the function and announced a grant of Rs 5 lakh for college development funds. Sugandha Mishra of MA I (music vocal) was declared “Pride of the institution”. Deepak Dhall of BBA III was declared “All-round best student”.

Meanwhile, St Soldier College, Basti Danishmandan, held its annual prize distribution function on Sunday. Over 350 students were awarded prizes, of which nine were awarded rolls of honour and 30 got college colours. Mr Charanjit S. Atwal, Deputy Speaker, Lok Sabha, and Bibi Jagir Kaur, MLA, Bholath, presided over the function. Mr Anil Chopra, Chairman, welcomed the guests. Mr Anil S. Multani, Director, read out the annual report.

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Youthspeak
‘Jalandharis are warm and friendly’

“The city has a unique charm. It is vibrant and it is rich culturally. Unlike in the West where individualism is the way of life, people here are ready to help you out even before you ask for it. Perfect strangers offer you warm smiles and are ready to be your friends. The people here just do not like to stay aloof. They have a kind of abiding interest in humanity.

How to lend a helping hand and strike a responsive chord with strangers — you can learn it all from the people here.

There’s something ennobling about the place. It’s a land steeped in history. Monuments, ancient sites, close family ties — I had a chance to see it all during my visit to Jalandhar. I was amazed to see langar being organised with great devotion.

Of course, one thing that put me off (or should I say it gave me a fright?) was the traffic on the roads here. It was as if the traffic rules had been bidden a goodbye Cars zoomed past, bikes honked their way through, and cycles and rickshaws seemed sandwiched between them. The very first day I was not sure if I would be able to negotiate my way through the maddening traffic.

But in the final analysis, the city is a great place to visit.”

— As told to Minna Zutshi

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Dispensary for the poor
Arun Sharma
Tribune News Service

In March 1992, this free allopathic dispensary in Kapurthala began with a doctor and a dispenser. In the last 14 years, Swami Mukand Hari Dharmarth Aushdhalya at Shree Satya Narayan Mandir has grown to the size of a mini-hospital with an OPD that handles daily an average of over 200 patients.

There are 17 qualified doctors including pediatricians, orthopaedicians, ENT specialists, eye specialists, gynaecologists and cardiologists, here. Some of them have a government job, while others run their own nursing homes.

The patients are daily attended to by three to four doctors. Some doctors visit once a week, others more often. There are now eight dispensers and eight others who help in allied services. The dispensary opens in the afternoon every day.

All medicines and injections are provided free of cost to patients. The money essentially comes from the people of the town and occasionally from some philanthropists and NRIs.

The dispensary also organises an eye camp on the temple premises every September. None of the patients are asked for any fees and the needy ones are even provided with lenses. The patients as well as the doctors stay in the temple for six days during the camp.

Now minor surgeries have also been started at the dispensary.

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From Schools and Colleges

The annual sports meet of Guru Nanak Dev University College, Basti Nau, was held on Saturday. The function began with the unfurling of the national flag by Mr Ashok Gupta, Deputy Commissioner. He gave prizes to the winners of various events.

Ms Usha Kapoor, Principal, and Mr M.S. Dhall, Director, Physical Education, were also present on the occasion.

Athletic meet

Trinity College organised its athletic meet and annual day function last Saturday. The chief guest on the occasion was Mr Amarjit Singh Samra, the Minister for Revenue and NRI Affairs. Father Kurian Muttathupadam, Director, and Father Simon Kalladayil, Principal, welcomed the guests.

(Compiled by Deepkamal Kaur)

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Market Buzz

A wide range of hand-painted unstitched suits, sarees, dupattas, stoles with sequins work would be displayed at an exhibition-cum-sale event by “Bugli’s Creations” at Hotel Shangrila at New Jawahar Nagar in Jalandhar on Saturday. The Delhi-based boutique would offer garments in various materials, including cotton, chiffon, georgettes and crepe, in the exhibition.

Establishment Day
The State Bank of India, Khurla Kingra branch, celebrated its 27th Establishment Day in a school here. An adult literacy programme was organised by the branch, where about 50 women were taught about alphabets. The staff of the branch led by Chief Manager, Mr S. K. Kapoor, distributed study material to the women. A seminar on “International Women’s Day” was also organised on the occasion.

Camp
Kidney Hospital, Jalandhar, has launched a month-long free screening camp for the early detection and prevention of chronic kidney disease. Dr S.P. Sharma, Civil Surgeon, Jalandhar, inaugurated the camp on Thursday. Lauding the efforts of the hospital, Dr Sharma said he was “appreciative of the fact that the hospital was carrying out an awareness campaign” on educating the rural population on the subject by contacting nearly 7,000 sarpanches in villages across Punjab, a press release issued here said.

Awards
Mr Mangat Ram Sharma, Minister for Transport, Jammu and Kashmir, and Mr Balwant Sharma, Director, Holy Faith International (P) Ltd, Jalandhar, presented awards to meritorious students of “Talent Search Exam: 2005” at a function held in Jammu. Dr Sheikh Bashir Ahmad, Director, Academic, J&K Board of School Education, Col S.J.S Sahi, Administrator, MBD Group, were also present on the occasion. — TNS

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Tiny tots take part in ‘Graduation Ceremony’
Tribune News Service

Tiny tots from CT Public School took part in a “Graduation Ceremony” recently. Students presented a cultural show. Mr Manbir Singh, Chairman, Ms Lakhwinder Kaur, Principal, and Ms Nidhi Ghai, in charge of pre-primary wing, were also present on the occasion.

Meanwhile, tiny tots from MGN Public School, Urban Estate, organised a modelling competition on Wednesday.

Among Pre-Nursery kids, Sherangad bagged the Prince MGN prize, while Mehul walked away with Princess MGN title. For KG classes, Sukhroop Deol was adjudged Master MGN, while Navroop Madaan clinched Miss MGN title. Ms Jaspal Gill, Principal, gave prizes to the students.

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