CHANDIGARH INDEX

 





Stars in their eyes
The young in the city are fast getting addicted to the sugary taste of success. They want to make it big in life and that too very early, says Anandita Gupta
W
onder what’s giving the city-based 18 somethings a heady high? Nah, it’s not getting a gorgeous date or buying a Tommy Hilfiger outfit. Neither is it watching that latest movie with friends, nor dropping dead shopping gizmos. What triggers off those bubbly endorphins in today’s youngsters is the sugary taste of success.

Masti ’n’ Melody
A
mish-mash of masti, mayhem and melody. Petite girls swirling to the beats of Kajrare-Kajrare. Young self-proclaimed shayaras reciting ghazals and hordes of students swinging merrily to the beats of melodious numbers. And as if it were not enough, lots of yummy Indian food doing the rounds. Well, that was all the annual awards function at Punjab University’s Sarojini Hall was all about. With the colour of celebration splashed all around, the students had oodles of masti. But what added real meaning to this magic was the sweet gesture of the hostel attendants, Mess workers, office employees and even the hostel’s STD wala and dhobi receiving awards of appreciation.

MAKING MERRY: Ajingle with Kajrare at Sarojini Hall. — Photo by Pradeep Tewari
Ajingle with Kajrare at Sarojini Hall

Men in pink
Baby pink is no more just for pretty girls of the world who wear dainty dresses. So many men in the city are adding colour to their lives, and wardrobes, by donning the soft shade of perfection, says Saurabh Malik
C
heerful pink is tearing men a shade away from blues and grays. Once associated with the bold and the fair, the colour is fast tainting the sahib’s masculine image with the hues of softness and grace. Just in case you haven’t spotted guys in the pink of health, it’s not too late. Go to any arcade across the city. Trot down the aisles and see two-fisted men teaming pale or shocking versions of the colour with ordinary hues, graciously and glamorously.

The vanishing Band
The old fashioned band is on its way out. Gayatri Rajwade meets the remnants of a lost tradition.
T
he Indian wedding band is dying, slowly. As the joie de vivre in the clashing chords of the instruments peters out with the end of the wedding season, it is time for the motley crew of musicians and band owners to pack up their instruments and begin the long haul to next year. Patience is their forte, for they do exactly that while waiting endlessly for the bride and the groom to arrive, to strike up a jocular, stretchy tune to celebrate the moment.



LOST TRADITION: An Indian wedding band striking up a jocular, stretchy tune to celebrate a wedding in the city. — Photo by Parvesh Chauhan

An Indian wedding band striking up a jocular, stretchy tune to celebrate a wedding in the city

Where tradition meets modernity
R
epresenting different age groups and their respective musical gharnas, both the proponents of ‘Khyal gayaki,’ Ustaad Muzahid Hussain Khan (65) of Delhi and upcoming classical vocalist Deepshikha (22) from Lucknow feel that the classical music these days is at its ‘shabaab’(zenith).

Jessica, don’t they say
A city girl’s ode to Jessica Lal

School ties are Forever
T
he bonds forged in school are forever. So it is with the first ever government model school that was built in the city way back in the year 1955. The reference is, of course, to the Senior Model School in Sector 16 with the road between the Rose Garden and the Japanese Garden lined by the yellow-blossomed Amaltas trees leading to it.

Defying gravity
A
nti-gravity swept them off their feet right on to cloud nine Saturday afternoon. As the thumping beats of reverberating music filled the air with ecstasy during “Anti-gravity” organized at AB’s Rendezvous in Sector 26, it was time to loose control for so many revelers tripping the light fantastic. Heaven is a place on earth was the impression the revelers got as pretty damsels in mini skirts with twin slits on either side, or in backless cholis, descended upon the polished dance floor of life to cut foot loose, merrily and gorgeously. In fact, you could actually feel the pulse the minute you set your foot into the joint.

AFTERNOON MADNESS: Students gravitating to ‘Anti-Gravity’ AB’s Rendezvous on Saturday. — Photo: Parvesh Chauhan

Students gravitating to ‘Anti-Gravity’ AB’s Rendezvous on Saturday

MATKA CHOWK
Shatabdi Hallmark
Sreedhara Bhasin
I
was on my way to Delhi by the morning Shatabdi. Upon embarking, we found our seats and settled down to the familiar sight of tea flasks and the sound of the sleepy instrumental music. This journey – I have made many times. A nice comfortable ride – marked by what I think are the Shatabdi trademarks.

TECH TALKS
Break free from the chains
“G
et A Free Crate Of Don Perginion Champagne…” “Send this to all your friends and your true love will call you…” “Send this to 10 people for good fortune. If not, ill-fortune awaits you…” Sounds familiar? We’ve all received such emails and sometimes hooked into sending them further, perhaps without even realizing it.

Jaya dabbles in melody
A
fter over 11 silver jubilees, the Bappi Lahiri-Jayaprada combination takes a new twist. This time, the pair that worked together in Tohfa, Ghar Ghar Ki Kahani, Maqsad, Aaj Ka Arjun, Haisiyat, Sharabi, Haqueeqat, Thanedar, Sinhasan, Muddat, Paatal Bhairavi and Mawali in the capacity of a music-director and an actress, is coming back in a different form.

PAMMY’S BEAUTY TIPS
NIGHT CREAMS FOR A GLOWING SKIN 
N
ighttime is the time when your skin gets the opportunity to renew, repair and restore youthful appearance with twice as much intense activity as during the day. This is when the metabolic activity of the skin cell structure is at its highest. In other words, when we are sleeping, our skin is repairing itself.

WRITE TO RENEE
Get your inner chords entwined
I
am a thirty-nine year-old woman and have been married for over eighteen years. My husband and me are great friends as we grew-up together in the same neighbourhood. Recently, I have started feeling that I am a stranger in my own home.

Food for ART
T
he opening of the exhibition of the French Artist Ka Ty Deslandes was done in style with wine and cheese served aplenty at the citibank gallery in Sector 9 on Friday night. The exhibition was put up in association with the Alliance Francaise de Chandigarh.





 

 

 


Stars in their eyes
The young in the city are fast getting addicted to the sugary taste of success. They want to make it big in life and that too very early, says Anandita Gupta

Wonder what’s giving the city-based 18 somethings a heady high? Nah, it’s not getting a gorgeous date or buying a Tommy Hilfiger outfit. Neither is it watching that latest movie with friends, nor dropping dead shopping gizmos. What triggers off those bubbly endorphins in today’s youngsters is the sugary taste of success.

Self assured, confident and ruthlessly ambitious, all these dreamers want is to be on the top of the ladder, and that too, early in life. We chat up some of these ambitious lads and ask them what’s it about success that makes them heady.

“As I saw the Miss India Natasha striding spiritedly, delicate strings of diamonds sitting pretty on her head and a victorious whoop of joy on her lips, I felt overwhelmed,” confesses Alka Kapur, a city-based class nine student. There would be a day when I’ll be on that ramp, being given a full hand by Bollywood biggies and celebrities,” she declares.

Then there’s Anuj Ghai from Mohali, doing his B.Com privately, “Its amazing how easy it has become to get famous in an instant. Look at shows like Indian Idol and Sa Re Ga Ma and you’ll see how popular the participants get. They get contracts, hype and yes, those makeovers we have to burn mega bucks on. I plan to participate in a show like this soon.”

Adds friend Nishant Dhir, “Earlier, if somebody sang well, he was just considered good enough for a school or college event. But now, he’s called the next ‘Indian Idol.’

Adds housewife Mrs. Sharif Ahmad from Chandigarh, “Today’s youngsters wanna start young and achieve young in life. Nobody’s content with a plain job at the age of 25 or 26.My younger son is just 22 and has been appointed at Bombay as a Logistics engineer by a reputed shipping firm. He’s on training for 2 years, but will be paid Rs.28000 per month meanwhile. Isn’t it great just at the age of 22?

Vouches Guneeta Kathuria, running a firm of her own, “Success is not just about money. It’s rather about achieving all the good things of life—respect, status, self-actualisation and a sense of achievement. And if we have it in us, why not go for it young and make big in life?”

And its not just about dreaming big. If today’s youngsters are building castles in the air, they’re also putting solid foundations under them. “I want to be a model and won’t be wasting time studying further after class ten. I’m going to Bombay where I’ll be joining some good modelling agency. I’ll complete my qualification, but study only privately,” says Niharika Bakshi from sector 11, Chandigarh.

Aaftaab Kharbanda, a resident of sector 15,Chandigarh, is another young achiever who believes in starting early in life, “ I made it to IIT in just one go and believe me, it involved a lot of hard work. Two years of countless books, courses and maddening tests. But yes, I knew one thing quite clearly. That IIT was the passport to instant success and that kept me moving!

The shine and shimmer of the glamour world, the lure of the power packed salary packages and an upbringing in a society where everything comes in an instant, why shouldn’t the younglings want success served instantly in a platter?

Masti ’n’ Melody

A mish-mash of masti, mayhem and melody. Petite girls swirling to the beats of Kajrare-Kajrare. Young self-proclaimed shayaras reciting ghazals and hordes of students swinging merrily to the beats of melodious numbers. And as if it were not enough, lots of yummy Indian food doing the rounds. Well, that was all the annual awards function at Punjab University’s Sarojini Hall was all about.

With the colour of celebration splashed all around, the students had oodles of masti. But what added real meaning to this magic was the sweet gesture of the hostel attendants, Mess workers, office employees and even the hostel’s STD wala and dhobi receiving awards of appreciation. “These people do so much for the hostel. So these awards of appreciation are just a little token of our love,” beamed Dr. Kiran, Warden, Sarojini Hall.

The students were also awarded appreciation tokens for their annual participation and involvement in the hostel activities. Prof.R.N Sharma from the Tata Institute of Social Sciences graced the occasion. Vouched Monika Kapil, a student from the hostel exclaimed, “ This is the time when we reflect on how’s the whole session been. At such a time, being awarded for something we participated in, say at the beginning of the session, feels great.”

And guess what, there was a surprise for the warden too. On completing her term as the warden, she was given a surprise gift by her girl students. The air was thick with nostalgia for the outgoing students. All in all, it was food, fun and masti all the way. — TNS

Men in pink
Baby pink is no more just for pretty girls of the world who wear dainty dresses. So many men in the city are adding colour to their lives, and wardrobes, by donning the soft shade of perfection, says Saurabh Malik

Cheerful pink is tearing men a shade away from blues and grays. Once associated with the bold and the fair, the colour is fast tainting the sahib’s masculine image with the hues of softness and grace. Just in case you haven’t spotted guys in the pink of health, it’s not too late. Go to any arcade across the city. Trot down the aisles and see two-fisted men teaming pale or shocking versions of the colour with ordinary hues, graciously and glamorously.

Still having doubts? Okay, drive down the road meandering its way through the hustle and bustle of daily existence to reach Chandigarh club or any other club late Saturday evening. You will find dare dazzles in the pink of perfection holding sparkling cut glasses of invigorating yellow elixir with beads merrily busting at the brim.

PLEASING PINK
PLEASING PINK. — Photo by Pradeep Tewari

Or else, casually go to a discotheque in the shadows of the night. Spot guys with rippling muscles painting the town red in soft pink tees over rugged denims. Even guys dead against using fair and handsome creams, or supporting ponytails, are donning pink used often for adoring the frock frills.

“In fact, top corporate bosses are tucking baby pink shirts and ties neatly inside dark or light coloured suits,” says Ginny Chawla of Just Causals in Sector 9. “Visit the office of any computer giant and you will find glaring testimonies to the popularity of the shade”.

Pulling out a pink shirt from the shelf, he says, “Men too want to be different now-a-days. They no longer wish to conform to the dullness of blacks and browns. That’s perhaps the reason why they are adding shades of excitement to their lives, and wardrobes. The colour looks great on them, undoubtedly. No wonder, men all over are using the shade to offset formal suits and even causal clothes”.

The pink effect

A business executive with a multinational, Ravi Sharma, loves to get out of the drab-colour-syndrome by wearing different shades of pink. “I often wear scarves having pink prints with hot jackets in contrasting or similar hues during cool wintry evenings,” he says. “During the day, I prefer donning a pink shirt with more or less a matching tie. You see, the colour is no more limited to just a handful of actors, musicians, models or even sports stars. It’s the in thing even among sober men like me”.

Branded popular

The prices vary between Rs 350 and Rs 1500, but the colour is available in almost all the showrooms selling branded wear. Go to any outlet offering Park Avenue, Louis Phillip, Arrow, Van Heusen and Turtle. You will find rows of shirts and tees in loving pink, or else with a hint of it.

This is not the end of it. Designer jeans with bright pink stitch lines, or else boxer shorts in loud shade, coax you to add colour to your life by picking up the stuff. Some of the stores in Sector 35 and 17 are even offering track pants with pink side stripes.

Bottom line

Forget the old dull stuff, safely. Muster courage and confidence to carry pink. For it gives you that elegant and sleek look that few shades offer. Besides designer tees, scarves and ties, you can pick up shirts in solid pink or checks, mufflers, jackets and even out-of-the-ordinary jeans. Go in for horizontal, vertical or diagonal stripes. They look chic. So guys, go ahead and pick pink, now. 

The vanishing Band
The old fashioned band is on its way out. Gayatri Rajwade meets the remnants of a lost tradition.

Most bands buy their musical instruments come all the way from Meerut where one firm, Nadar Ali and Co. who received a firman (ordinance) during the British Raj to sell instruments is the primary supplier. What is more, even the Defence Services Bands’ buy their equipment from here. 

The Indian wedding band is dying, slowly. As the joie de vivre in the clashing chords of the instruments peters out with the end of the wedding season, it is time for the motley crew of musicians and band owners to pack up their instruments and begin the long haul to next year.

Patience is their forte, for they do exactly that while waiting endlessly for the bride and the groom to arrive, to strike up a jocular, stretchy tune to celebrate the moment.

The city alone has almost 125 bands catering to 500 to 600 weddings in a season, primarily from October to end-February. For the rest of the year, the band owners pass the time, keeping their meagre offices open to take on bookings that may crop up.

Phool Singh, proprietor of one of the city’s oldest bands—Krishna Band in Sector 23-C—says at the beginning of every year, he and his ilk go to the pandits and compile a list of the days that are deemed auspicious for weddings ceremonies. The waiting game then begins.

Competition is fierce and cooperation is out of the question. “There is no unity amongst us. There are a fixed number of weddings every year. If we work together, set up a union, even the government will be forced to give us some concessions,” says Phool Singh.

For these people it is a waste of a lifetime. “We have spent years learning our craft and even though we have to play to earn a living, the music means everything to us,” says Bhau Ram, owner of Pooja Band, who learnt to play the shehnai as a young boy.

For him, the year is spent taking loans to survive the “dry season” but his riyaaz continues unabated, two hours every morning, day after day, year after year for those meagre two or three ‘performances’ in a year.

Sant Lal Dabla’s brass band “Capital” in the city, in Sector 23 can arrange for trolleys, ghoris (horse for the groom), and palkhi baggis (carriage for the bride), “but what is the point. Most of us are running at a loss or are under a severe burden of debt”.

The problem is of mounting overheads and lack of musicians to play in the band. Sant Lal travels all over Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana and the Punjab looking for players.

With the cost of living going up every year, musicians are asking for more money and those playing heavier musical instruments ask for three times more than the daily wage decided upon, after all the work is laborious, the hours are long and money is not much really.

The defeat is of an age-old tradition, of an unusual musical history. 

Where tradition meets modernity

Deepshikha ,Muzahid Hussain Khan
Deepshikha ,Muzahid Hussain Khan

Representing different age groups and their respective musical gharnas, both the proponents of ‘Khyal gayaki,’ Ustaad Muzahid Hussain Khan (65) of Delhi and upcoming classical vocalist Deepshikha (22) from Lucknow feel that the classical music these days is at its ‘shabaab’(zenith). 

The well-acclaimed maestro, Muzahid Hussain hailing from the Rampur Sehswan Gwalior gharana, which owes its allegiance to the celestial musician, Miyan Tansen, reiterated that a lot many youngsters had opted for classical streams with dedication and accomplished finer nuances of this realm, pointing towards the vivacious and versatile Deepshikha.

The Ustad maintains that the Classical musical arts, undeniably, had the patronage of the affluent royals but the practicing musicians were few , even much less than the exponents of Indian music in foreign lands.

Many NGO’s like Spic –Macay are engaged in the proliferation of rich Indian musical heritage, which were never attempted earlier. In fact that the education and promotion of fine arts was limited to elite musicians of gharnas only, implies that the artists only prospered and not the art.

However with the changing scenario, the rigid code of classical traditions, especially in music, must be softened to ease its propagation and neutralization of western influences. Despite maintaining the purity and serenity of ‘khyal gayaki,’ the Ustad is equally versatile in the renditions of Thumri dadra, ghazal and folk forms so as to be in tune with the times.

Young Deep Shikha, coming from a musical family of Lucknow is product of the Bhatkhande (Deemed) music university. Specializing in ‘khyal’ gayaki her versatility encompasses the other genres of music like ghazal and playback singing for TV serials, even the jingles. She sees a bright future in his passion and profession of classical music while practicing thumris  weaved around the themes of ‘Holi’.

— S.D. Sharma

Jessica, don’t they say
A city girl’s ode to Jessica Lal

Don’t they say,
to be kind and helpful,
is a sign of weakness,
and you can be seriously laughed at.

Don’t they say,
might is actually right, 
And to be judged right,
you must have some might.

Don’t they say,
virtues of an era bygone
are justice, truth and faith,
And to believe in these is stupid and rather late.

Don’t they say,
it’s the end that matters,
the means what may be,
and who dares or cares?

Oh! Jessica,
I’m ashamed,
of what I’ve been told,
and I’m ashamed of myself too.

For, except empty talks,
over cups of tea with page 3, 
I could do nothing, Jessica.
Cause I, too, was a part of it.

— Ankita Sharma

School ties are Forever

Old boys on a nostalagia trip in Senior Model School, Sector 16
RAMP WALK: Old boys on a nostalagia trip in Senior Model School, Sector 16. — Photo by Pradeep Tewari

The bonds forged in school are forever. So it is with the first ever government model school that was built in the city way back in the year 1955. The reference is, of course, to the Senior Model School in Sector 16 with the road between the Rose Garden and the Japanese Garden lined by the yellow-blossomed Amaltas trees leading to it.

Saturday night was a happy time for the old guys and gals to get together and over the fizz of the champagne bottles sing: For we were jolly good fellows. The fellows were not just jolly, they were very bright too and a number of them are literally at the helm of the country’s affairs. Among them are Ambika Soni, Union Minister for Tourism, Rao Inderjit, State Minister for Defence, and Bhupinder Singh Hooda, CM, Haryana. There are a whole of others shining brightly in different fields. There is Dr. Rajan Saxena (Padamshri) who is a liver transplant specialist in Lucknow and Deepak Thapar, leading lawyer in the city.

Sunil Parthy of the 1971 batch who took the leas in getting together old students and forming the Senior Model Alumni Association, Sector 16, SMAA-16, some four years ago, says “We will hold a number of functions this year as part of the golden jubilee c celebrations.” These will include a gala fete and merit scholarships for the senior school students. This is a way of returning something to the institution that shaped many lives well. — TNS

Defying gravity

Anti-gravity swept them off their feet right on to cloud nine Saturday afternoon. As the thumping beats of reverberating music filled the air with ecstasy during “Anti-gravity” organized at AB’s Rendezvous in Sector 26, it was time to loose control for so many revelers tripping the light fantastic.

Heaven is a place on earth was the impression the revelers got as pretty damsels in mini skirts with twin slits on either side, or in backless cholis, descended upon the polished dance floor of life to cut foot loose, merrily and gorgeously. In fact, you could actually feel the pulse the minute you set your foot into the joint.

As the Saturday afternoon fever caught the revelers in its exciting high-temp’ grip, their exhilarated figures, illuminated by nice little psychedelic lights, swayed breathlessly in sync with the rhythmic throbs of high-wattage music.

Oh, yes! The beats of “kajrare-kajrare” and “Dus bahane” got the crowd grooving in no time with the in-house and the guest disc jockeys (DJs) spinning tracks to produce some cool funky music. No matter what your party style was, the place had something to offer. You could actually gyrate to some of the best tunes dished out by the DJs, fervently.

As good old retro and classic rock gave way to hip-hop music, jackets went up in the air. Among the dancers twirling all around the floor were not just teenyboppers, but also young professionals from call centers eager to lose their blues amidst the melodious tunes. Well, the couples had to pay for the pleasure, but “single” damsels were let in free, absolutely. Discrimination on the basis of gender, but guys you just can’t do anything about it!

Screaming over the din of music, one of the organizers Nitesh Sharma said their basic aim was “to unite cream of city’s youth once every semester”. “Youngsters want change, and that’s exactly what we offer through new concepts”, he asserted. Swell, isn’t it! —S.M.

MATKA CHOWK
Shatabdi Hallmark
Sreedhara Bhasin

I was on my way to Delhi by the morning Shatabdi. Upon embarking, we found our seats and settled down to the familiar sight of tea flasks and the sound of the sleepy instrumental music. This journey – I have made many times. A nice comfortable ride – marked by what I think are the Shatabdi trademarks.

We, Indians like to hustle whenever any embarking or disembarking is involved. I guess, it is the deep-seated fear of losing out something to somebody else or the fear that sharing and order would somehow be detrimental to one’s self-interest. I have been a witness to a great deal of samaan wars on this train. Since everybody wants their baggage to be in closest proximity overhead, the latecomers often find the bins over their seats already full. One gentleman tried to make some space by moving another’s bags. The other leaped out his seat and bellowed –“Mere samaan ko hath mat lagana.” At that, the first gentleman reddened and they both plunged into a full-scale war. At one point, one threatened to throw the other out of the train. They both fought, without even once trying to figure out if both their bags could indeed fit. After an hour, with their bags settled, they were discussing Canadian visa.

Besides, samaan samhalna, the passengers also like to pick on the bearers. One gentleman complained that he required real milk and not creamer packets, and demanded it to be brought immediately. He threw a tantrum, when refused. One wanted his bread slices toasted. The incredulous bearer was at a loss of words for what seemed like ages.

He looked at us and saw me trying very hard to suppress the giggles and broke out himself. At that, the gentleman was deeply offended. On this particular trip, which was the day after Holi, one gentleman demanded a newspaper. He was informed that newspapers do not come out the day after Holi. He found that hard to believe and engaged in what seemed like a Spanish Inquisition. The poor compartment attendant apologized profusely for an oversight of such grave nature.

One man lost his pink, security baggage sticker, which the policeman on duty usually sticks to the baggage. He asked me if I had any extras. I could not oblige. Hence, he brooded the entire way and told me morbid stories of how baggage identification is such a difficult problem on international flights.

One couple, definitely not from Punjab, did not manage to keep their bags close by. The wife ordered the man to sit near the bags, rather than next to her. They conversed the entire way, by shouting at each other – over my head.

There will be many more journeys – I hope. I am looking forward to every one of them.

TECH TALKS
Break free from the chains

“Get A Free Crate Of Don Perginion Champagne…” “Send this to all your friends and your true love will call you…” “Send this to 10 people for good fortune. If not, ill-fortune awaits you…” Sounds familiar? We’ve all received such emails and sometimes hooked into sending them further, perhaps without even realizing it. That’s right, I’m talking about Chain Emails. Chain emails are one of the down sides of the Internet that never seem to go away; sometimes it seems to grow each day. So what exactly are chain emails? Where do they come from? What would the originators gain and why are they so bad? Now’s the time to learn all you’ve ever wanted to know about chain emails but were afraid to ask!

What is Chain Mail?

A ‘Chain Mail’ is a message that is sent, most popularly now through email, to numerous people at one time. Its one common feature is to instruct the receiver to send multiple copies of the mail to their friends by playing on their emotions. Chain emails often use arguments of threat, fear, love, lure, compassion, superstition or just plain curiosity.

Chain letters are not vices of new technology. For centuries there have been chain letters in circulation promising good fortune or serious consequences if the reader does not do what the letter requests. Many people disregard such mails or recognize them to be a hoax. However, there are several who will join the chain just for superstition, if for no other reason. With email and Internet allowing a swifter, easier and almost free method of communication, chain e-mails have flourished.

How do I recognise it ?

The single easiest recognisable trait of a chain email is the request to forward it to ‘10 people’ or ‘everyone you know’. Some emails will try to entice the reader by requesting - ‘Forward this to 10 people within 15 minutes and you will find true love’ some play on lure or greed – ‘Send this to 10 people and you will get $20,000 for free’ or have a slightly more threatening tone - ‘Do not ignore this or ill-fortune will prevail’. Most emails will encourage readers to keep the chain alive with promise of rewards that are at best, impossibly unrealistic. Can you imagine, why would anyone give away several thousand dollars, Laptops, I-pods or mobile phones for free just for sending emails?

Is there anything devious?

Most people think chain mails are harmless, fun and nothing to worry about. But there can be sinister undercurrents to many of the chain mails that are currently circulating on the Internet. Some chain mails will wrongly assume an air of authority purporting to be from a particular company or charity when this is simply not true. No company or charity will ever request help, information or funds through a mass circulated email. Likewise, no charity, company or individual will donate 100 Rupees/Dollars/ Pounds each time an email is forwarded. No petitions or judicial cases have been won through chain emails. No political prisoners have been released through chain emails. When the reader is fooled into thinking they are contributing to a good cause, it is wrong. It is also wrong and illegal to send an email on behalf of an individual or company when you have not been given the authority to do so.

Courtesy: Atul Gupta, CEO – RedAlkemi.com. 

Jaya dabbles in melody

After over 11 silver jubilees, the Bappi Lahiri-Jayaprada combination takes a new twist. This time, the pair that worked together in Tohfa, Ghar Ghar Ki Kahani, Maqsad, Aaj Ka Arjun, Haisiyat, Sharabi, Haqueeqat, Thanedar, Sinhasan, Muddat, Paatal Bhairavi and Mawali in the capacity of a music-director and an actress, is coming back in a different form.

Actress Jayaprada now turns singer in a foot-taping catchy number with ace music director Bappi Lahiri and Adnan Sami at the Venus recording studios, Mumbai. The song is for Jayaprada Productions’ maiden venture that is set for a next month Mahurat.

Says Jayaprada, “Making a film is exciting, and being a successful artist, I am also excited that I am making a different kind of a film.”

Adds the lovely lady, “My passion for art is from my childhood, dancing and singing have been an integral part of me. When Bappi Da felt that my voice would best suit this song, I was charged.”

The actress has always been the one to take on challenges and meet them. Currently, she effectively manages her role as MP-actress-danseuse and now as a singer. “Challenges have always excited me,” she confesses. “I am sure the combination of dada, Adnan and me will be a good one.”

For Bappi Lahiri, the song is equally a challenge. “It is a very different kind of film, and definitely not a musical love story. And hence creating songs for the film is a challenge by itself. The songs flow smoothly with the film’s narrative and that is a fun of making music for this film.”

— D.P.

PAMMY’S BEAUTY TIPS
NIGHT CREAMS FOR A GLOWING SKIN 

Quick Tips

Soften skin overnight with cream and cover your pillow so that it isn’t transferred to the pillowcase and is fully absorbed. All creams are not created equal. Avoid the thick and oil based creams as they can clog pores for people with oily skins and who are prone to break outs. Go for fragrance free, hypoallergenic, non-comodeogenic creams that will not block the pores. Our bodies emit toxins through the skin daily, therefore the skin must be able to breathe and not obstructed by a heavy oil based night cream. There are creams that are non greasy, extremely potent, but will cost you.

Night after night, the creams will give your skin the power to undo the effects of time and you will wake up with lovelier skin!

Nighttime is the time when your skin gets the opportunity to renew, repair and restore youthful appearance with twice as much intense activity as during the day. This is when the metabolic activity of the skin cell structure is at its highest. In other words, when we are sleeping, our skin is repairing itself. Skin ageing is largely due to free radicals, which assault healthy skin cells resulting in the appearance of dull and damaged skin. As we age, our skin goes through a lot of changes, our skin cell turnover slows down immensely and some of us need help. With the beating that our skin takes, it is important to give that extra little attention at nighttime. Do we really need to slather night cream on our faces at night? We are quite ill informed and confused. Ever stopped to think why night creams are so important? How do they work and how essential they are for our face? I strongly advocate the fact that night creams are very essential to our skin care.

The cosmetic industry is constantly striving to produce effective skin care products on the shelves for enticing you to purchase the stuff of dreams – a miracle in a jar! The array of beautiful packaging is bewildering for the consumers. How do you then make a choice? It’s important for you to know that night creams are thicker than day creams as they are packed with nourishing ingredients; when your skin is at rest these ingredients target the areas that need attention. They are particularly beneficial for women past 30, whose skin is drier and less able to fight damaging free radicals created by UV rays, smoke and pollution.

As a rule, richer the cream, better it is. But I always encourage my clients to try the richness of the cream and observe skin. Good cream is smoother, fuller, firmer and penetrates into the epidermis, leaving your skin nourished. If there is too much oil on the surface of the skin then discontinue the usage. Always buy something expensive when you know how effective the product is going to be or when you have checked with your dermatologist.

Liposomes are commonly used by cosmetic companies for repairing deeper layers of the skin. AHAS(acid from the citrus fruits) are favourites with the cosmetic industry and have shown effective results, in reducing the visible signs of ageing and increased pigmentation. SHEA butter is used for its rich textures and strong hydrating properties. Glycerine maintains right amount of water for the skin and improves softness. Silicone is just a water-binding agent. Beware! Too much of it can make your skin feel greasy. Skins optimal moisture balance is maintained by omegas and also to fight the signs of ageing. Alovera is a potent moisturizing agent that helps regenerate and heel the skin. Jojoba oil helps skin retain moisture by reinforcing the dry skin’s hydrolipidic film. Hyaluronic acid has powerful moisturising properties, an essential protein found in the skin. Conditioning milk peptides and is clinically shown to brighten skin, leaving your face to feel soft, fresh and smooth.

Avoid creams, which contain mineral oil or are petroleum based as they leave skin greasy and clog pores. Stay away from products with SD alcohol, and formaldehyde, as they will dry out your skin. Avoid lanolin based creams as they can cause allergic reaction on people with sensitive skin and are acne prone.

Too many preservatives such as parabens, sodium laurel sulphate and sodium benzoate should be avoided.

WRITE TO RENEE
Get your inner chords entwined

I am a thirty-nine year-old woman and have been married for over eighteen years. My husband and me are great friends as we grew-up together in the same neighbourhood. Recently, I have started feeling that I am a stranger in my own home. I have a full time job and apart from that, I do voluntary social work on the weekends. This weekend, I decided to stay at home and realized that my two kids and my husband and me had nothing to say to each other. Whatever we spoke about seemed trivial and unimportant. I feel I have lost touch with my family. Even my social life is negligible. I hardly have any friends. I always felt building a career was very important. Now suddenly it has no meaning as all my relationships are messed. Please advise on how to deal with this.

Aruna, Chandigarh

I am glad that at some point in your life, you have realized that you are missing out on the ‘real thing’ in life, and that is a good relationship. Having fun and the love and support of our loved ones is the vital thing in life. Without having the inner chords entwined, life is pretty meaningless. No matter how successful you are in your career front, until you haven’t bonded with your loved ones-life is not fun really. Start spending more time with people who matter in your life and you will feel more in charge. It will in turn give you more energy and you will be able to indulge in more hobbies and activities you enjoy. Make a commitment to yourself. Don’t say to yourself that you will try to do things your way. Just go ahead and do them. Don’t allow a career to take a hold on your life. After all, it is one of the roles you are playing. Go watch theatre with your family or may be even a movie followed by a meal in a restaurant and then watch the family share some happy moments together. Enjoy it.

After 15 years of living together we are thinking of going through an amicable divorce. When I look back at life with my husband, I feel we didn’t really give our marriage much of a chance. We were so busy doing the right and dutiful, social thing. We were great parents to our kids, good friends with our friends and great employees. In the process we realized that we were two people just co-existing in the same house. We both worked hard to give our selves and our children a certain standard of living but I think we scarified a loving partnership along the way. It happened slowly over the years and we never realized it until it was too late. Now I don’t know what to do as I miss the idea of being married already. Help!

Rasjeet Grewal, Mohali

It’s never too late in life to pick up on any situation and turn it around. You are obviously two intelligent people, that is why you have amicably decided to part ways. But is it really necessary to do so? If you are already missing the idea of being married why not give this one another chance? There are so many relationships that get sour due to negligence and taken for granted attitude. Of course, we cannot take the clock back, but we can of course try and make a go of things once we realize that the situation is never irreparable. Relationships are fragile bonds, which require constant nurturing. We need to work on them like a gardner works on his plants. Try to give each other a short space and a breather from your tired relationship. Then may be date each other as friends. Enthuse some life into the relationship by doing some new things together. Who knows divorce may be the last thing on your minds soon?

Food for ART

Ka Ty Deslandes talks about her art
MAKING WAVES: Ka Ty Deslandes talks about her art. — Photo by Parvesh Chauhan

The opening of the exhibition of the French Artist Ka Ty Deslandes was done in style with wine and cheese served aplenty at the citibank gallery in Sector 9 on Friday night. The exhibition was put up in association with the Alliance Francaise de Chandigarh.

The show was as charming as the artist and very poetically titled ‘Between Waves and Shores’. What makes her creations very interesting is that the artist uses discarded material collected from different shores and it includes jute, gunny bags and coffee sacs. Then the artist with her creativity fashions them into art and the symbolism is evocative. The waves stand for the creative impulse and the supports the material world.

Deslandes’ is a search for new mediums and she experiments with them very evocatively. The exhibition of large-format works, sculptures and installations will be open to the public till March 29.—TNS 

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