SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
M A I L B A G

It’s triumph of democracy in Nepal

This has reference to H.K. Dua’s front-page editorial King vs. people (April 23) and another editorial “King climbs down” (April 26). Ultimately, the Nepal King had to yield before the people.

Parliament has been revived and a government headed by Mr G.P. Koirala will take the people’s struggle for democracy, peace and prosperity further. The first step will be the election of a Constituent Assembly to frame a new democratic Constitution of the country. Hopefully, keeping in view the people’s sentiments, the little Himalayan kingdom will do away with the institution of monarchy.

On its part, India in deference to the democratic wishes of the people of Nepal should support the emergence of a new, modern and democratic republic of Nepal. Only a democratic set-up can save Nepal from violence and bloodshed. Maoists have already committed themselves to a peaceful democracy in the country.

SUDESH SHARMA, Kapurthala

II

It’s people’s victory in Nepal. There was no other option left before the King than to revive Parliament and control the month-long agitation. We should praise the people of Nepal, journalists, activists and the Seven-Party Alliance for having turned down the King’s offer and insisted on restoration of democracy in the country.



Dear readers

Letters to the Editor, neatly hand-written or typed, upto 150 words, should be sent to the Letters Editor, The Tribune, Sector 29 C, Chandigarh. Letters can also be emailed at the following address: letters@tribunemail.com

— Editor-in-Chief

 

People’s victory in Nepal once again showed to those who were against democracy (also Maoists) that if people are united for a noble cause, no power on earth can stop it. But it was most shocking that the United States which poses as the real champion of democracy is keeping mum on the triumph of democracy in Nepal.

BIDYUT KUMAR CHATTERJEE,
Faridabad

III

The people of Nepal should have a fresh Constitution which may be conceived and adopted by their elected Constituent Assembly. The people have been seething with strong resentment against the King and his team because of their criminal negligence for decades in addressing the issues of poverty, unemployment and civil liberties.

The uprising in Nepal proved beyond doubt that the King could not take the masses for granted and he had to restore democracy. I appreciate Mr Dua’s genuine support for the democratic struggle against the anachronism of the Nepali political system.

RAJ BAHADUR YADAV,

Fatehabad

IV

Our political leaders, strategists and policymakers will do well to keep a close watch on the developments in Nepal. We need a stable and democratic neighbour capable of promoting regional peace and security, ensuring thereby the economic prosperity for its people.

Brig G.S. KHIMTA (retd), Shimla

V

I am happy that democracy is back on the rails in the little Himalayan Kingdom. The revival of Parliament and appointment of Mr G.P. Koirala as the Prime Minister is a welcome step. However, people want total democracy and a Constituent Assembly.

India is especially wary of the Maoists. The new government should have the powers to negotiate with the Maoists. Then pressure can be mounted on the Maoists to disarm and become a part of the mainstream politics.

India’s actions should be such that it should not lose the goodwill of the people of Nepal. People must not perceive that it is going soft on the King.

GURDERSHAN SINGH, Chandigarh

VI

I am happy that India has played a responsible role in restoring democracy and normalcy in Nepal. Monarchy is an anachronism in the present-day world. King Gyanendra has learnt a lesson from the Queen of England who confined herself to being the head of the democracy where power lies with the people.

K.J.S. AHLUWALIA, Amritsar

VII

King Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah imposed his personal rule in Nepal. He dissolved Parliament by an arbitrary decree, arrested political leaders and began suppressing civil liberties. This is the root cause of the recent uprising in Nepal.

Mr Dua has rightly said that ground realities in Nepal have changed in a big way. The Government of India should feel happy that its sincere efforts for a democratic government in Nepal have at last fructified.

SUBHASH C. TANEJA, Rohtak

Cement prices zoom

Cement prices have gone up. This imbalance has to be rectified soon to sustain the infrastructure and housing boom. In just one year, the prices have risen from Rs 140 to Rs 250 a bag! Manufacturers blame the rise in freight, prices of fuel and coal. Builders say, there is no change in the rail freight or excise duty and that manufacturers are creating an artificial shortage.

Chaotic conditions prevail at major projects. The government should bring the situation to normal. A cement prices regulatory committee (CPRC) should be constituted with powers to clamp ceiling over cement prices. The CPRC has to ban cement export and slash import duties to invite import at a rate competitive with local prices. The quality of cement should remain intact.

JAGVIR GOYAL,

Civil Engineer, Chandigarh 


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