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Perspective | Oped | Reflections

PERSPECTIVE

Peace in Nepal
Killing two birds with one stone
by Major-Gen Ashok Mehta (retd)
N
either the ten-year long Maoist war nor the 12 years of multiparty democracy nor even the one-year direct rule by the King could resolve the political crisis in Nepal.

On Record
Action against Iran inconceivable, says British envoy 
by Rajeev Sharma
When Sir Michael Arthur took over as the British High Commissioner to India in late 2003, he would not have dreamt of the fast developments in the region — the most important being the Indo-Pak detente. One year prior to his arrival here, the armies of India and Pakistan were deployed face-to-face.



EARLIER STORIES
THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS

Haryana canal plan needs a close look
by G.S. Dhillon
T
he Haryana government’s decision to build a 2000-cusec capacity canal to take water from the Bhakra Main Line (BML) canal to the adjoining Western Yamuna Canal (WYC) needs a close look. The rationale behind this project is to ensure that water from the Bhakra Canal Command Area (BCCA) receiving excess water serves the parched areas of south western Haryana.

OPED

Reflections
Training women to become leaders
by Kiran Bedi
T
his fortnight was full of creative happenings for me from which I drew greater learning and inspiration. The happenings were: (a) Listening to Muslim women in a training programme, (b) An interaction with over 120 officers, men and women, in one of our premier civil services of the country, and (c) the release of a police manual for police trainers on gender issues.

Profile
Yechuri, the Left’s most vocal face
by Harihar Swarup
T
he BJP might question the role of Sitaram Yechuri in Nepal but the part played by this young Marxist in brokering a deal between the outlawed Maoists and the seven-party alliance would remain a landmark in the history of the Himalayan Kingdom. Yechury has a good equation with top Maoists leaders, Prachanda and Baburam Bhattarai, and with his persuasive skill, he prevailed upon them to join the democratic process in Nepal.

Diversities — Delhi Letter
Have a heart for widows and half-widows
by Humra Quraishi
I
t’s getting to be so unbearably hot here that at times I just wish I manage to fall in love with a pahari and with that invariably move towards some hilly abode. Far from this maddening scenario. Such is the pace here that there’s coming up World Hypertension Day. Yes, May 13 stands reserved as this special day where cardiologists and specialists will talk to you on stress and stress management.

 

Editorial cartoon by Sandeep Joshi

 
 REFLECTIONS

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Peace in Nepal
Killing two birds with one stone
by Major-Gen Ashok Mehta (retd)

Neither the ten-year long Maoist war nor the 12 years of multiparty democracy nor even the one-year direct rule by the King could resolve the political crisis in Nepal. Nineteen days of defiant people’s power killed two birds with one stone — terminalised monarchy and introduced absolute democracy, the twin objectives of the Seven Party Alliance (SPA) and Maoists.

As soon as the tripolar fight became bipolar, the cause and solution to Nepal’s festering problem — the King — got surgically taken out. That is, almost. The Royal Nepal Army (RNA) which had stood by him read the writing on the wall and Army Chief, Gen Pyar Jung Thapa announced that while the King would remain the supreme commander, the Army would take its orders from the Prime Minister and Defence Minister.

In other words, the RNA would return from direct command by the King under Article 127 of the 1990 Constitution to Articles 118 and 119 which stipulate that the King is the Supreme Commander and “shall perform the operation and deployment of the RNA on recommendations of the National Defence Council” chaired by the Prime Minister and no longer the King.

It is a different matter that the spirit of the said Articles was in the past never observed by the King. Rather, no Prime Minister could have his way in employing the RNA against the Maoists earlier than when it was used.

Those who do not understand the ground reality in Nepal feared that once the King was not on the scene there would be a political vacuum, anarchy and the Maoists would take over. It was forgotten that in such a contingency the RNA would have taken over but only as caretaker till such time political rule was restored.

While the RNA has a history of carrying out anti-democratic operations and its contempt of the political class no secret, it has never shown any propensity for military rule. Its higher leadership was firmly under Royal control. Yet, it functioned under elected governments during the 14 years of fractious democracy. Like the Indian Army, it does not have the stomach for a coup d’etat.

The Maoist takeover of Kathmandu is an existential threat, nurtured by the US which is deeply suspicious of the insurgent group and will not remove the terrorist tag till Maoist actions and deeds, not words, confirm they have renounced violence and arms. There is already some confusion over the question of surrender of weapons prior to elections.

The scripting of the Delhi agreement between SPA plus One in which India played a backchannel role and the CPM leader Sitaram Yechury was upfront, has become the blueprint for a peace and political process that was undoable when the same political parties were in power. The King would not allow consideration of a Constituent Assembly which was the bottom line of the Maoists.

The one-year repressive rule of King Gyanendra was a blessing in disguise. It united the political parties, split the Royalist parties, enabled the Delhi Agreement and unified the people of Nepal into converting protest meetings into vigorous and spontaneous people’s uprising.

The most ardent of Royal admirers have no place to hide, so shamed were they with his brutal and selfish roadmap of reviving absolute monarchy. The Gagan Thapas, Kanak Dixits and Top Bahadurs of Nepal will not settle for anything less than the head of father and son, Gyanendra and Paras. The euphoria of getting back Parliament, mainstreaming of the Maoists, elections to a Constituent Assembly and promises of liberal economic packages from the international community are dreams come true.

At one stroke, Nepal has been rescued from the brink. But it is not going to be a bed of roses. Problems ahead start with the uncertain health of Prime Minister G.P. Koirala, difficulties in forming a government and the heightened expectations of the Nepalese people. Events have overtaken all roadmaps. People want monarchy dismantled by tomorrow and social and state reforms introduced the day after.

Politicians want short cuts to removing all Royal symbols. However, in place still is the 1990 Constitution. Till a new Constitution is drafted, the old one will remain in operation. Changing the existing Constitution involves legal hurdles which the “doctrine of necessity” alone cannot overcome.

The four-point Yechury plan is almost done: revival of Parliament, interim government, peace talks and elections to a Constituent Assembly. Beyond this plan is another world, inhabited by Maoists celebrating over their victory. Maoist sincerity to stick to the rules of the game will come from deeds, not commitments.

The first hurdle will be about deposition of weapons. Baburam Bhattarai has said they will keep their arms till the Constituent Assembly is formed. If they agree to surrender arms, it will be to a third party. They expect the RNA to do the same.

The terms and conditions of merger of the Maoist army with the RNA will be the second point of tension. Former minister, Col N.S. Pun had detailed discussions with Maoist leaders on eligibility criterion for joining the Army during the peace talks in 2003. General Thapa says that capability and qualification will determine the intake.

Maoist Politburo member Maitrika Yadav said recently, their aim is to eventually establish a Communist state. The question that follows is the sincerity of the Maoist in fighting elections to the fourth Parliament. The most optimistic estimate gives them 20 to 25 seats in a 205-seat House. The Nepali Congress and the Unified Marxist Leninists of Nepal are likely to emerge first and second in the elections.

After 10 years of a bloody war and with 10,000 cadres killed, why would Maoists settle for a number three slot in Parliament? They abandoned the electoral route in 1994 after they realised that power flows from the barrel of a gun.

Even if it is CPM, which is not part of the UPA government, thank Lord Pashupatinath someone is now making foreign policy on Nepal!

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On Record
Action against Iran inconceivable,
says British envoy 
by Rajeev Sharma

Sir Michael Arthur
Sir Michael Arthur 

When Sir Michael Arthur took over as the British High Commissioner to India in late 2003, he would not have dreamt of the fast developments in the region — the most important being the Indo-Pak detente. One year prior to his arrival here, the armies of India and Pakistan were deployed face-to-face.

Today, both are smoking the peace pipe. Despite the sporadic terrorist attacks, the peace process is on and India is making news internationally because of its enhanced diplomatic and political stature in the world. In an exclusive interview with The Sunday Tribune, he answers questions from a wide gamut of areas.

Excerpts:

Q: What is your assessment of the Indo-US civilian nuclear cooperation deal? Do you agree with reports from Washington that the US Congress would okay the deal in July?

A: That is for the US Congress to decide. We are strongly supportive of the US-India agreement. Indeed we have worked behind the scenes with both governments to try to help take this forward. India is a responsible member of the international community and therefore we believe this initiative is right.

Q: Will your country bat for India at the 45-nation Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG)? Will your country bat for India at the NSG? If so, how?

A: Absolutely. We support the terms of this exchange. We will continue to make our view known to NSG members. India can also help create a positive atmosphere by reminding the NSG why this deal is good for them, for the future non-proliferation regime, and for India.

Q: The Iran crisis is again threatening to get out of hand. Are you in favour of military diplomacy with Iran now? Do you think all other routes have closed?

A: As our Foreign Minister Jack Straw has made it clear, military action against Iran is inconceivable.

Q: Do you foresee military, political and economic sanctions against Iran?

A: The issue is not Iran’s right to develop a civil nuclear capability which we accept. The problem is that Iran has deceived the IAEA in the past and continues to do things in a manner that it is trying to build a nuclear weapon. Iran has not complied with repeated requests for cooperation from the IAEA and now the UN Security Council. We will continue to discuss this with P5 partners and other close allies.

Q: The Iran tangle is leading to rising crude oil prices. What is the international community’s plan to deal with the problem?

A: Iran’s ability to influence global oil prices shouldn’t be overestimated.

Q: Are you satisfied with the pace of Indo-Pak peace talks?

A: There has been huge progress since my arrival here in late 2003. India and Pakistan should continue to thicken their links. The May 3 announcement that both countries will open more trade and people-to-people links is a great example of the progress made hitherto. Both can resolve their differences. We condemn all acts by terrorists — like the one in Doda very recently — that are designed to disrupt this progress.

Q: Is the BPO sector in India resulting in growing unemployment in Britain? How is the Tony Blair government responding to it? What are the implications for India?

A: No, not at all. Unemployment in the UK is very low, much lower than in France and Germany. In a global economy, the shifting of services between countries is not only inevitable but also beneficial to business.

If doing things cheaper here enables a British company to be competitive, then the economy as a whole will get the benefit. It will benefit both India and the UK. The UK should ensure that people in the UK have the necessary skills to find new employment. Everyone gains from a free market. This is a two-way process. We benefit in Britain from the 500 Indian companies now established in my country.

Q: Many Indian brides are cheated of their legal rights by their run-away grooms who take ex-parte divorce in the UK taking advantage of loopholes in British laws. What is being done to address this issue?

A: Nine lakh people travelled between the two countries last year, the overwhelming majority of them perfectly happily. It isn’t a question of loopholes in the British law. The legal structure in the UK is there to protect individuals from criminal acts including fraud. If some country has a genuine complaint, it should seek expert legal opinion.

We want to build on the people-to-people links between the two countries and ensure that they continue to grow. That is part of the reason why I was in Chandigarh on May 5 to discuss the high standard of the visa service that we provide in the state. We want many more visitors, businessmen and students to come to the UK from Punjab.

Our visa service nowadays is very customer-friendly. We make great efforts to be so. Try it, you will find a warm and reassuring welcome! 

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Haryana canal plan needs a close look
by G. S. Dhillon

The Haryana government’s decision to build a 2000-cusec capacity canal to take water from the Bhakra Main Line (BML) canal to the adjoining Western Yamuna Canal (WYC) needs a close look. The rationale behind this project is to ensure that water from the Bhakra Canal Command Area (BCCA) receiving excess water serves the parched areas of south western Haryana.

The Rs 250-crore, 109-km link canal is being built at top speed to connect BML-Hansi-Butana canals; it would draw water from the BML left bank where both banks of BML lie in Haryana’s jurisdiction. The off-take point is located just below the Samana town of Patiala district in Punjab and Azamgarh village in Kaithal district in Haryana.

The BML at the off-take location carries 6,975 cusecs of which 85 per cent flow is for the BCCA of Haryana, 10 per cent for downstream areas of Rajasthan and the remaining 5 per cent for Punjab area below the off-take point.

The regulation control is located 8 km downstream of the off point. Thus, for effective diversion of water, a cross regulator must be built with suitable gated control in addition to the side regulator with gated control. For this, Haryana should seek the permission of Punjab and Rajasthan. It would also require careful design and planning, so that the “closure” affected is optimally minimum. As Haryana is yet to work out the design and planning measures, no estimate is given out regarding the length of the “closure”.

The BCCA presently gets 4.216 million acre foot (MAF) water. After the diversion of 2000 cusecs, the volume left will be 2.756 MAF. Will it affect the BCCA? Some canal irrigated area will require to be termed as “rainfed” or non-perennial and such a measure could trigger social unrest.

The BCCA was aimed at serving the ‘arid area of East Punjab’. The irrigation intensity and the water allowance of the area to be irrigated by the Bhakra Canal were kept minimum for optimal growth. With careful planning and suitable irrigation measures, the BCCA emerged as the most efficient system, free from waterlogging. However, if water to the extent of 35 per cent of the present-day availability is withdrawn, it would adversely affect the area.

Though the Hansi-Butana Canal Command Area of the WYC has considerable “plus water balance”, it is expected to be given a “dose” of 1. 46 MAF water. The areas of Haryana which suffer from waterlogging fall in this command.

To undo the injustice done three decades ago, we should not rob Peter to pay Paul. Let us carry out a simulated computer study of the command area and other factors determining the water demand. The focus should be on assessing the likely impact of the proposed measures before implementing them on the ground. 

The writer is a former Chief Engineer (Irrigation), Punjab

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Reflections
Training women to become leaders
by Kiran Bedi

This fortnight was full of creative happenings for me from which I drew greater learning and inspiration. The happenings were: (a) Listening to Muslim women in a training programme, (b) An interaction with over 120 officers, men and women, in one of our premier civil services of the country, and (c) the release of a police manual for police trainers on gender issues.

In all the three events, the common thread happened to be women at different levels of development in our society. Let me first come to the Muslim women: I witnessed the closure of a training programme for Muslim women, sponsored by a Trust and supported by large-hearted Muslim donors, and a bank from overseas. It was indeed a heartening experience to see where the Muslim women’s needs too were slowly coming into focus. The feedback revealed a world of a difference the training programme had made in their attitudes. Perhaps a first such exposure for all of them.

Many of these women attending/sitting in the training room were with veils on their faces, while I was amongst them in my police uniform. They listened to me with great respect and awe. I wondered how much more time will they take to shed these ‘curtains’ (as I see it) from their faces…

I wanted to ask them (but did not, due to the presence of men) if they were keeping themselves camouflaged because of the absence of personal courage or fear of men or being shy of elders or strictly faith?

Well, this is India with all its diversity of circumstances and opportunities. But I was quite surprised to see that the Self Help Group (SHG) programme for women was still alien to them, when it has become a success in micro credit schemes for women all over the country. It had been specially mentioned and supported by our Finance Minister in this year’s budget speech. Apparently, women end up “shopping or sobbing” with all kinds of soap operas on the television, than for acquiring knowledge and information. I told them that while such training courses were of immense importance, today the media has educative value too if they so choose to pick. The remote is in their hands. This is one huge segment of Indian society which truly needs greater attention of the government and the non-government sector.

In the Question and Answer session, one of the answers which was probably difficult for them hear was, when they asked me, “What has made work and home possible”? I said, “ Small family. I decided to give birth to one child and not more.” For most of the women sitting in the audience, this was still a distant dream. But then, they were not alone.

My second happening confirmed this when I got to speak to probationers of a premier service of our country. After I finished my interaction with the officers, one of the women officers who accompanied me in my car to drop me back, asked me “Madam, how will my juniors take my orders if I assert? Or if I make a mistake? Or if I tell them not to do a particular thing in the manner they are used to doing? Will they listen to me as a woman?

I shot back instinctively and said, “of course they will? Yes, a lot depends on how you prepare yourself. How well you train yourself. How well you keep yourself informed or how confident you become? And certainly how willing you are to learn even from your juniors: Knowing that they could know more than you”.

She went back wondering the tough and long journey of professional life that lies ahead of her. More so as a woman. She was not behind a veil.

Yet not sure of her still, even when she had academically qualified for the premier service of this country. I wondered was she an isolated case? No she was not…!

Now on to the third issue: concerning a matter of training men to respond and enforce matters which concern women’s safety and security. I was invited to present a critique on the Manual being released for Police Trainers. I found it to be a very useful training manual, brought out by the Center for Social Science Research, Delhi. The manual is an excellent road map for police trainers to train police trainees on gender issues, particularly domestic violence and trafficking in women.

But the pertinent question I did ask was — while the trainers have this material to train, who are the trainers? Where will they come from? Because so far training in police is still not a priority issue. Those appointed to training feel discounted.

Unless police training becomes a priority for police leadership, well written manuals will remain unutilised. In fact, if a collection of state police training policies is made from all states it may be an eye opener. Some states may still not have a well declared training policy. Delhi Police itself did not have one, worth being called a policy, till just a few years ago. (I framed one and Police Commissioner Ajai Raj Sharma approved it).

So much for fighting terrorists? Naxalites? Cyber crimes, Communal riots? Crimes against women? Any one listening?

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Profile
Yechuri, the Left’s most vocal face
by Harihar Swarup

Illustration by Sandeep JoshiThe BJP might question the role of Sitaram Yechuri in Nepal but the part played by this young Marxist in brokering a deal between the outlawed Maoists and the seven-party alliance would remain a landmark in the history of the Himalayan Kingdom. Yechury has a good equation with top Maoists leaders, Prachanda and Baburam Bhattarai, and with his persuasive skill, he prevailed upon them to join the democratic process in Nepal.

The result was ushering in of a pro-democracy government, marking the end of the 16-month absolute rule of King Gyanendra. Yechury has gone on record saying that Maoists were ready to lay down arms and come to the mainstream of politics. With the tag of “terrorists” having been removed, Maoist leaders have begun appearing in public. Maoists, no doubt, have a strong political influence in Nepal and, without them, it would be difficult to consolidate the democratic process in the landlocked country.

At the moment, Yechuri is the hero in Nepal; he was lustily cheered as he watched the opening session of Parliament in Kathmandu. He headed a delegation of MPs from India which was invited by Prime Minister G.P. Koirala to attend the opening session.

Yechuri gave up a lucrative career to pursue his ideals. He had a brilliant academic career, having remained always at the top. Having done his schooling in Hyderabad, he graduated from St. Stephen’s College in Economics with first class. His rendezvous with Marxism began when he was studying for Masters degree in Economics in Jawaharlal Nehru University.

Getting a high-profile job for a man of his calibre was quite easy but Yechuri resolved that all he had studied should be used to change the system. To achieve this objective, joining mainstream politics was very important.

Even though Yechuri never fought a direct election, he is the most vocal and recognisable face of his party in and outside the Rajya Sabha. Radical views of this media-savvy leftist conform to that of his party. The vision of Yechuri and his party has been a society free from exploitation and a society where the political power rests with the vast majority of downtrodden people. Yechuri’s assets, according to his own version, are “very meager”. He has inherited some property which is not yet come to him as it is part of the Hindu undivided family. In the CPM, all leading members submit an annual statement and they can be examined by anyone.

Yechuri was recently asked: “With criminals aspiring to be Chief Ministers and corrupt politicians calling the shots, how do you expect the youth to come forward and join politics?” Pat came the reply: “Precisely to change this sort of situation. And this is happening. Further, there is a need to establish that politics is not only electoral politics. It has larger and more noble objectives. It requires the efforts of all sincere people to create this atmosphere”.

In 1998, when the CPM declined permission to West Bengal Chief Minister Jyoti Basu to become the Prime Minister, a peeved Basu had described the decision as “a historic blunder”. The CPM leadership had hard time explaining why the party missed this life-time opportunity. The most plausible explanation came from Yechuri who was an important member of the Politburo.

According to Yechuri, the CPM decided not to lead the United Front Government because the party had only 33 members while the majority mark was 273. Had Jyoti Basu become the Prime Minister, he would not have been in a position to implement the party’s policies. He had, obviously, to commit more to the United Front’s programme with which the CPM had basic disagreement.

In effect, it would have meant betraying the trust of the people who had voted for Marxists on the plank of its programme and policies, Yechuri reportedly explained.

Exactly five years back, the Marxists were re-elected in West Bengal, but edged out in Kerala. Yechuri was then asked a very crude question: “Don’t you think, Marxists are a bunch of idiots, fit for nothing”. His one-line cryptic reply was: “The opinion can only be reciprocated”.

In Kerala, he explained, the people have a habit of changing government every five years. This was unfortunate but there was no exception to this rule and “we were voted out of power”.

As the Assembly elections this month are on the verge of completion, Yechuri should have reason to cheer up; Marxists may edge out the Congress this time.

Yechuri has been a member of the Rajya Sabha for over a year, but made a mark as parliamentarian and emerged as the young face of the House of Elders. His forceful intervention in the debates have become talk of animated discussion in the Central Hall of Parliament.

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Diversities — Delhi Letter
Have a heart for widows and half-widows
by Humra Quraishi

It’s getting to be so unbearably hot here that at times I just wish I manage to fall in love with a pahari and with that invariably move towards some hilly abode. Far from this maddening scenario. Such is the pace here that there’s coming up World Hypertension Day. Yes, May 13 stands reserved as this special day where cardiologists and specialists will talk to you on stress and stress management.

I suppose by now most of us know the basics of this. But then, few are relatively away from it. So much so, we even seem to bypass the word “happiness”. I was almost taken aback when a while back I had met a former bureaucrat and academic B.P. Singh and asked whether I was okay and happy. Happy! Who can be happy in today’s scenario? This was my initial reaction though. I am told that in smaller countries like Bhutan, this one-liner, “are you happy”, is chanted along the pattern of hellos and good mornings.

Perhaps, if this one liner picks up as a form of greeting, it could lead to introspection and more in the context of hypertension days and more.

Not to overlook the realities which continue to persist. The reality of the condition of millions of widows in the country. As Mohini Giri, Chairperson of Guild of Service, points out, there are 33 million widows in India. Every fourth household has a widow. And if one were to see their condition whether in Vrindavan or in Varanasi, it’s best to view the documentary, White Rainbow. Directed by Dharan Mandrayar, it bagged the Director’s choice award for the best feature film at the recently held Sedona International Film Festival. It is scheduled to be screened here this weekend at the India International Centre.

And if one were to move just a step ahead and see the condition of half-widows, it could be termed even more tragic. I don’t know about the reality of half-widows in other cities. But yes, in Srinagar, there are hundreds of half-widows who are still sitting in suspense, so to say.

In the Kashmir valley, there are almost 8,000 missing young men (some estimates put the figure at 10,000). Most of these men had been picked up for interrogation by various security agencies and never got back home nor can be found in any of the jails, so presumably dead, but not officially. Consequently, their wives — half-widows — sit in suspense with no support.

It’s really tragic to hear their sorrow as they just gape and await. Most women have been ruined financially as they had sold off their property, land, jewellery to go looking from jail to jail for their missing men. Though they did not find them, they keep waiting for them with some hope.

One needs to move two steps ahead and probe the condition of widowers in big cities. If one were to go by the findings of the New Delhi-based marriage counselor Avdhesh Sharma, single men find it extremely difficult to cope with. They could be economically and socially okay, but the emotional vacuum drives them crazy.

Sharma says that they can get to be so lonely that they are inclined to be drawn to the nurse-maids or caretakers employed in the house or if working then they are drawn to the office colleagues. It’s sheer urban loneliness that plays havoc. Yes, there is something very wretched about urbane loneliness where nobody seems to have time to hold your hand.

Books and musical distractions

Urban people seem to be doing one thing rather well. Books coming out as never before. And there’s a frill to it, big and well known publishing houses are bringing out these books in the Indian languages, besides English. Last year, Penguin Books

India launched the Bhasha series. With books of Khushwant Singh, Namita Gokhale and a few others getting translated into Hindi and other languages. A few weeks back, Arundhati Roy’s collection of essays (translated into Hindi) was launched. Last week also saw the launch of Hindi writer Himanshu Joshi’s short stories, Agla Yatharth, published by Penguin Books India and Yatra Books.

I think this is a healthy trend. After all, writers are writers so there shouldn’t be the so-called language or regional divide between them. There ought to be forums and platforms where writers of different languages get to meet and interact. With emphasis on the cut-off areas and sectors of the country, where locals are writing at an unknown pace yet the rest of us don’t get to read because of the language divide.

Translations are the only way out. Yet, there are few who take the trouble of translating. This brings me to write that recently writer-cum-film maker Reema Anand won the CrossWord award for translating Krishna Sobti’s book, The Heart Has Its Reasons (Katha), jointly translated by Reema Anand and Meenakshi Swami.

An evening of Faiz Ahmed Faiz

The well known forum, Shaam-e-Ghazal, gets you in the Faiz Ahmed Faiz mood. As I went through a volume on his poetry, The Best of Faiz, translated by Shiv K. Kumar and published by UBSPD, the page that opened was (for some strange reason), the one carrying these lines from his verse, titled Heart Attack:

“Pain so intense that night, my savage heart/

wanted to grapple with every artery/ and drip from every pore/

and out there, as though in your courtyard/

each leaf, bathed in my despondent blood /

began to look pale in the moonlight /

In my body’s desert places, it seemed/

As if, all the fibres of my wincing veins, undone/

Began shooting out signals, ceaselessly/

preparations for the departure of love’s caravan/

And when in memory’s fading light/

There emerged somewhere before the eye/

one last moment of your love’s kindness/

the pain was so lacerating that/

it ventured to overstep the moment/

I too willed to hold on to it

But the heart would not agree…”

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In God’s creation there are all sorts of things. He has created bad men as well as good men. It is he who gives us good tendencies, and it is he again who gives us evil tendencies.
—Ramakrishna

The Lord neither creates the urge for action, nor the feeling of doership, nor the attachment to the result of action is people. The power of Material Nature does all this.
—The Bhagavadgita

No one is free from contention and strife.
—Guru Nanak

I eat whatever You give me. There is no door, other than Yours, to go to.
— Guru Nanak

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