CHANDIGARH INDEX

 





Oceanic high
Old songs are not just great sources of inspiration, but also provide musicians with a perfect base to build up a musical superstructure, says Saurabh Malik after talking to four-member boy band Indian Ocean
C
ALL it fusion, or just amalgamation: Indian Ocean’s rippling music hits you with the intensity of Tsunami. For, unlike most music videos and cassettes flooding the market, it’s not just about adding basic beats to the existing numbers before labeling the stuff as remix versions. It’s ‘something original’.


Making Waves: Members of the indian Ocean Band performed in the city on Saturday. — Photo Vinay Malik

Members of the indian Ocean Band performed in the city on Saturday.

Monsoon Wedding
Anandita Gupta
A
shower of sparkling, glistening water swept across some sprightly merry-makers. And as these joyous souls bunched up, cupping their hands to collect some of this rushing torrent, it zigzagged and trickled down mischievously. Filling the place with dicy puddles to step and dance into, this cascade of water had joy de verve bubbling up, no less. If you’ve mistaken it to be the arrival of Monsoons in the city, think again. The real Monsoons may be far away, but the city’s just witnessed a mock-monsoon. And cloaked as a rain-dance, it was none but a city-girl’s pre-wedding bash, celebrated amidst splashes of sparkling water.

Girls’ night out: Khushboo Kochchar and gang

Girls’ night out: Khushboo Kochchar and gang

FILM REVIEW
Much ado about nothing
After romantic comedy Shaadi Se Pehle Bollywood’s showman Subhash Ghai and his banner Mukta Arts has come out with another big budget multi-starrer 36 China Town. The viewers were disappointed with this crime thriller.

PAMMY’S BEAUTY TIPS
Lipstick and you
L
IPSTICK has been around for thousands of years and has always been a part of fashion statement. Women of all ages feel incomplete without putting lipstick on. Though makeup for young girls has not always held an accepted place in our society but these days wearing lipstick by the young is no more considered impolite. Keeping this in mind I have got a bag full of lip tip.

Who is a radio jockey?
Tuning-In with Hardeep S. Chandpuri
F
RIENDS, it was with interest that I came across the term RJ or Radio Jockey when I returned from my stint in Melbourne, Australia. I was aware of the fact that abroad everyone used the simple term Disc Jockey to identify the person speaking over the microphone, spinning records and also selling everything from the latest brand of Anti-Wrinkling cream to the spiciest flavour of Hakka noodles on FM radio.

Angad Bedi plays Prithvi
Prithvi in childhood even born after 10 years long prayers and all, he allows none of the parents to pamper him. He is gem of a kid. He is most naughty and sharp among the princess. Often Kamlavti feels tired of his naughtiness. But along all the naughtiness, every now and then he surprisingly thinks deeply on bigger issues whom a king should think.

Write to Renee
Just love yourself

I am an 18-year-old college going girl and would love to know how to build up my self-confidence. As a child, I was often physically beaten by my mother and also teased a lot by my peer group in school. As a result I feel that my self-esteem is very low I am in a constant state of panic.

Laugh away your blues
Sunil Manocha
H
AVE a good giggle or two till your tummy aches and your mood elevates. If you haven’t done that, try it. You may probably even laugh your way out of a cry. Well, that’s the philosophy behind laughter clubs, operating throughout the country. Besides promising a chunk of health and mood enhancement, laughter refreshes the body and soul and can cure more than 70% of illnesses—heart disease, depression, tension, high BP, headaches, stomach ailments and so on. And considering these benefits of laughter, laughter therapy has sprung up.
Last Laugh: Senior Citizens of the city getting rid of stress. Photo: Pradeep Tewari
Senior Citizens of the city getting rid of stress.

Chandigarh Zindabad
Sreedhara Bhasin
C
handigarh folks do not know (and luckily so) the joys and anguish of morchas and street protests. Me – on the other hand, having spent my entire childhood and youth in Calcutta, possess an ocean of knowledge in that matter. The other day, I was in sector 17 and there was a supposed protest going on – bunches of people squatting under a banyan tree listening to a skinny man shouting away into an ancient microphone. 

Capturing stillness
L
andscapes do not fascinate her. For, gushing water cutting its way through the vastness of running mountains reminds her of the society’s mad race against fleeting time, and all the uncertainties that accompany it.

Bodycare — the herbal way
F
abindia today announced the launch of Fabindia Sana — a range of authentic, effective Bodycare products. The Fabindia Sana range includes soaps, shampoos, hair oils, pure oils, moisturisers, body scrubs, face packs, hair conditioners and specialised skin and face care products.

FUN WITH FASHION
Romancing your looks
Anandita Gupta
R
omance isn’t always birdsong and dew drenched Daffodils. Nor is it just Mills and Boons, chocolates and teddy bears. And neither is it solely the sparkling rivers dotting the mighty mountains. Romance can also spring from your personality, from what you wear.

Sleepless in Chandigarh
Anandita Gupta
A
S the dusk softly gathers up the City Beautiful in its snug arms; some houses in the city seem to be at their most radiant selves. Flickering candles, fancy mesh-lights, festooned flowers and festivity frolicking at every nook and corner. As one steps inside, what meets the eye is some delightful devotion, charmingly dappled with some joie de verve! Sprawled on the ground is a swarm of devotees, swaying merrily to the music around. Their faces glimmering under the light of the wavering candles, some of them raise their arms and exclaim, “Jai mata di.”

All-night vigil: Jagrata celebrations dotting the dark nights of the city.
All-night vigil: Jagrata celebrations dot the dark nights of the city

My life, my story
Saurabh Malik
Y
ou do not need a stethoscope to learn what’s in his heart. It’s written clearly on the cover of an anthology of short stories doctored by the city-based cardiologist, Dr Jaideep Singh Chadha. The book, “Please mom! This is my life”, was released at the Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, as a part of the Alumini Association celebrations.

Health TIP OF THE DAY
Posture is the relative alignment of various body segments with one another. Good posture indicates bones being in aliment while muscles, joints and ligaments work as a single unit. When in alignment stress on body segments is minimum. This increases an individual’s ability to perform and improve overall efficiency. This also helps the body to produce the desired motions. — Dr. Ravinder Chadha






Oceanic high

Old songs are not just great sources of inspiration, but also provide musicians with a perfect base to build up a musical superstructure, says Saurabh Malik after talking to four-member boy band Indian Ocean

CALL it fusion, or just amalgamation: Indian Ocean’s rippling music hits you with the intensity of Tsunami. For, unlike most music videos and cassettes flooding the market, it’s not just about adding basic beats to the existing numbers before labeling the stuff as remix versions. It’s ‘something original’.

Talk to them and you realise that the four-member band is dead against aping others for coming out with hit numbers. “It’s true that the music you hear all the time influences you and your thought process, but then we add our own perception and personality to the music for coming out with a new form,” says drummer Asheem Chakravarty.

Flashing abroad smile, Chakravarty says: “As such, our music cannot be categorized to fit slots created by fixed mindsets. And even if it can be classified into an all-new category, it has not been done so far. Basically what we hear comes out with a distinction. All we can say is that our music sounds so Indian”.

The band is in Chandigarh for performing live at the Chandigarh Golf Club as part of “Legends Live” by Seagram’s 100 pipers. As the band members speak about their music, you realise that the beats and the notes flowing out of their instruments overlaps with each other in complete harmony likes ocean waves to give you real rock breaking numbers that 
draw attention.

At once you recognize the fact that their numbers are so very different from the run-off-the-mill remix songs that sound just the same. “The problem with the remix numbers is that the technique adopted by the musicians is just the same…. They basically add techno beats to the original numbers, top them up with semi-clad girls and expressions like `Yo! Men’. In the process, the essence is lost,” says guitarist Rahul Ram.

But does that mean that they are against remix numbers? “No, not at all! We only do not appreciate the way the entire thing is done. You see, the numbers being remixed are songs that had topped the charts say three decades ago. As such, they are proven to be good numbers. But instead of adding quality to the songs by coming out with newer versions, the disc jockeys and others are simply coming out with fast adaptations. In the process, they mar the songs,” says Ram.

Then what is the solution? “Well, instead of just reproducing the old numbers, the bands should some out with their own versions, just as it is done in the West. You basically have the same song, but produced in an entirely different manner,” says Susmit Sen. “In a bhajan we have done, the dholak and the harmonium has been replaced by guitar and drums. The end result is simply fantastic. Sounds cool, indeed!

Monsoon Wedding
Anandita Gupta

A shower of sparkling, glistening water swept across some sprightly merry-makers. And as these joyous souls bunched up, cupping their hands to collect some of this rushing torrent, it zigzagged and trickled down mischievously. Filling the place with dicy puddles to step and dance into, this cascade of water had joy de verve bubbling up, no less.

If you’ve mistaken it to be the arrival of Monsoons in the city, think again. The real Monsoons may be far away, but the city’s just witnessed a mock-monsoon. And cloaked as a rain-dance, it was none but a city-girl’s pre-wedding bash, celebrated amidst splashes of sparkling water.

City-based Khushboo Kochchar had recently thrown her pre-wedding party. The venue was her flower-draped terrace in Sector 21-D, Chandigarh, looking much like a coy bride. As the chilled water dripped and trickled off the roof and the walls of this flower-bedecked terrace, Khushboo’s friends danced till wee hours of the morning. “They took off their chappals and turbans and jumped wildly in the chilly water,” laughs Dr. Kochchar, Khushboo’s father. The city’s only woman deejay Bhavana enthralled the 50 friends invited by the bride-to-be, tempting snacks titillated the palates. “It was basically a dance party and we had just snacks — Biryani, Kathi Roll, Chicken Tikka and Fish fingers,” informs Khushboo’s brother, a catering expert.

And the air thundered with thick festivity. “My friends had flown in from all over the country and they had whale of a time. They had dressed up the Hawaiian way—colourful shorts, skirts, floral pyjamas with lots of garlands, anklets, beads and straw hats,” says Khushboo. An MBA who’s been associated with Shymak Dawar’s Institute of Performing Arts (SDIPA) and performed at the Commonwealth Games, Australia, Khushboo has many accolades to her credit. Besides having been qualified for Channel V’s Pop star and Zee’s Mega Cine Star, she was also among the regional finalists of Ponds Femina Miss India, 2006.

But right now, she’s the soon-to-be bride, who’s conjured up some magical themes for her wedding. “My wedding on May 6, 2006, will be magical too, but I’m keeping the theme as a secret,” she giggles like a schoolgirl. And of course, with beau Bipin Grewal an Event Management professional and creativity oozing out of her pours, could a Monsoon Wedding be far behind?

FILM REVIEW
Much ado about nothing

A scene from 36 China Town
A scene from 36 China Town

After romantic comedy Shaadi Se Pehle Bollywood’s showman Subhash Ghai and his banner Mukta Arts has come out with another big budget multi-starrer 36 China Town. The viewers were disappointed with this crime thriller.

Especially, since it comes from the same director duo Abbas-Mastan who made the excellent Aitraaz for the Mukta Arts earlier. This spice of thriller stars Akshay Khanna, Shahid Kapoor, Kareena Kapoor, Payal Rohatagi, Isha Koppikar, model turned actor Upen Patel, Paresh Rawal and Johny Leaver. Tanushree Dutta and Priyanka Chopra make a special appearance. 36 China Town opened on Friday at Piccadily, Chandigarh, Fun Republic, Manimajra and K.C. Panchkula.

The thrillers specialist Abbas-Mustan working with Subhash Ghai, fails to maintain their winning streak this time. On the positive side, photography and picturisation of songs are good, with music director Himesh Reshmmiya giving some outstanding compositions. Experienced Sameer has provided joyful and trendy lyrics to the funky beat music of Reshammiya. Shahid Kapoor and Kareena Kapoor have previously acted together in Fida, which was not a success at the box-office. Both play fugitives in this murder mystery revolving around a number of usual suspects.

Shahid and Kareena are just okay. Upen Patel excels at playing the handsome playboy. Payal Rohatgi shows much skin. The hugely talented Paresh Rawal and Johny Lever are not exploited to their fullest but they manage to raise a few laughs.

36 China Town is not in the league of previous Mukta Arts banner flicks. In short, don’t go to flashy promos. Another big budget thriller fails to deliver.

— D.P.

PAMMY’S BEAUTY TIPS
Lipstick and you

LIPSTICK has been around for thousands of years and has always been a part of fashion statement. Women of all ages feel incomplete without putting lipstick on. Though makeup for young girls has not always held an accepted place in our society but these days wearing lipstick by the young is no more considered impolite. Keeping this in mind I have got a bag full of lip tip.

When looking for lipsticks look for the ones with vitamin E, aleovera, sunscreens, amino acids and collagen to protect lips from weather elements and also to keep the softness. To get the shine on your lips, oils and fats like cocoa butter, olive, mineral, castor oil are used. So if your lipsticks do not have the staying power then check for the ones with less oil content. Lipsticks are made with a combination of wax, oil, pigments and emollients. Bees wax, carnauba and candelilla wax are used in lipsticks to give that ease of application. Lipsticks that leave a faint colour on your lips have silicone oil to seal the colour on your lips. All these ingredients are mixed together and put in moulds where it becomes solid and you get your tube of colour.

Out of frost, glossy, matte or creamy ones, always choose the lipstick that compliments your lips. Remember deep or bold colour compliment light eye make up, while light lip colour compliments heavy eye make up. Plum, wine and red shades of lipstick flatter dark skin tones, while light skin tone must go with pink or orange undertones. Olive skin can carry browns and raisin shades of lip colour very well. Stay clear of orange and brown shades as they make teeth appear yellow. Women after 50 should only stick to creamy textured lipstick never matte or glossy as they will dry up and cake off after sometime.

The perfect stroke

Always define the centre curve on the upper lip with two precise strokes. Use short strokes with the lip-liner as they are easier than a continuous line, on the lower lip work from the centre to the corners. Use the high shine gloss to trace the outer edge of your lips with a brush dipped in lustrous lipper.

Reduce the shine around the edges by adding a thin layer of baby powder with the help of a brush. Lipgloss can be used for a nude look or to add that extra shine also. Try a coloured gloss or hint of sheer lip colour for that casual look.

Tips for that perfect lip

Exfoliate your lips with a warm, wet washcloth by wiping back and forth for no more than 30 second.

To make it last longer, apply sheer foundation on your lips and then dust it with powder.

Outlining the lip prevents lip colour bleed; the colour of your lip liner must be very close to your lipstick colour.

Gain a few more hours by applying lip pencil to the entire lip area.

For longevity of the lipstick always apply two coats, after the first one, press lips on a tissue and then proceed with the final coat.

After applying lipstick keep your lips slightly apart for the colour to set.

A thin layer of lipstick last longer than a thick layer.

Keep lipstick off your teeth by popping your index finger in your mouth and pull it out, this way the lipstick wouldn’t get to your teeth.

Remember

For the longevity of the lipstick, store your lipstick in the fridge.

Don’t ever use a tester on your lips, it’s unhygienic. Try on your finger tips not the back of your hands.

Save the last bits of your lipstick by using a cotton bud to scoop out and mixing it with a lipgloss to wear.

Wash your lipstick brushes regularly to avoid build up of colour.

I am positive after all the tips you will have greater appreciation for that colour in tube!

Who is a radio jockey?
Tuning-In with Hardeep S. Chandpuri

FRIENDS, it was with interest that I came across the term RJ or Radio Jockey when I returned from my stint in Melbourne, Australia. I was aware of the fact that abroad everyone used the simple term Disc Jockey to identify the person speaking over the microphone, spinning records and also selling everything from the latest brand of Anti-Wrinkling cream to the spiciest flavour of Hakka noodles on FM radio.

Then I moved to North America and came across the term “Radio Disc Jockeys” and while I was doing my own shows, I met the famous radio star Bill Singer and unknowingly called him a Radio Disc Jockey. He immediately pulled me up and told me very tersely, “Look my friend, here they don’t call us Radio Disc Jockeys please, we are better known as Radio Personalities”. Phew….. “Sorry Bill”, I mumbled.

There I also came across another term “On-Air Personality”, which is reserved for people like the great Casey Kasem, Rick Dees, Shadoe Stevens and stars like Ameen Sayani and Jasdev Singh, closer home. And how can you forget the term “Shock Jock” which is synonymous with who else but…Howard Stern, who thrives on shocking people on his shows and the result is a five year long $500 million deal with a leading satellite radio operator. That surely shocks…..right.

Then on my return to India I wanted to get to the bottom of this and try and figure out as to how this term originated. All my efforts went to a naught and I was against a blank wall. Suddenly, I woke up one morning and it was clear as the dew drop on the rose petal. Actually, the concept of Club DJs or Wedding DJs had come a lot earlier than the concept of FM Radio, as we see it today. So the term DJ became synonymous with the guy spinning “Nehron Paar Bangla…” at a wedding function and we, the Radio Disc Jockeys of our country had to content ourselves, with just being called a Radio Jockey, which has become totally acceptable with the passage of time.

But remember one thing; no one knows what the term Radio Jockey or RJ means beyond the shores of India.

(The writer is a renowned radio personality running Radio Buzz, a voice trainer and an international broadcaster)

Angad Bedi plays Prithvi

Prithvi in childhood even born after 10 years long prayers and all, he allows none of the parents to pamper him. He is gem of a kid. He is most naughty and sharp among the princess. Often Kamlavti feels tired of his naughtiness. But along all the naughtiness, every now and then he surprisingly thinks deeply on bigger issues whom a king should think.

He loves his parents, Jaichand, Nayantra, Anangpal and all and gets the same from everybody. In short he is BALKRISHNA in his childhood and as he grows up, he reflects all the variations of Lord Krishna; the Murlidhar, the Chhaliya, the Chakradhar etc.

He has a friend Chander and the equation with him is almost of Krishna and Sudama. At the young age he defeats many of the kings and intruders but always keeps a space for “kshama”. It shows he never fights in anguish but he just serves a kings duty, which is the main character of Lord Krishna as we know.

— TNS

Write to Renee
Just love yourself

I am an 18-year-old college going girl and would love to know how to build up my self-confidence. As a child, I was often physically beaten by my mother and also teased a lot by my peer group in school. As a result I feel that my self-esteem is very low I am in a constant state of panic. Many times when I meet new people, I start to perspire in nervousness. If I feel I have to accomplish a task given by my teacher I always seem to feel that I will not be able to do it. I either hesitate or hold back. I would love to learn to trust myself and take initiative in things. Right now we have a few holidays but I know a part of me does not want to go back to college. I feel very hopeless and helpless. Can you please help me to feel better and more self-confident.

Vasundhara, Panchkula

My dear girl, at your age you should be brimming with a certain level of confidence. You have absolutely no business to be feeling the way you do. Life should always be full of joy and happiness. It is evident that you are still carrying your childhood fears with you. Take time out to reassure yourself that you are safe. Just tell your inner child that you are not alone in the world, you are a part of the whole universe and loved by life. It seems as if your body is living in a constant state of alarm, and this is like the “fight or flight” syndrome, the body produces adrenaline and you start perspiring heavily. Please do not allow such heavy stress to take over your life. Just love yourself and repeat this like a Mantra, “It is safe for me to forgive all my childhood traumas and love myself totally for who I am”. Enjoy your new sense of freedom.

I am a 32-year-old struggling artist who has lived the life of an idealist throughout. While I am painting and drawing, I come alive but this is short lived because the harsh realities of life mean, bills to be paid. I have held many jobs as a salesman in a cloth shop, a waiter in Chinese restaurant, I have even run a florist’s shop. None of these things have satisfied me. Somehow I feel so tired by the end of the day that there is no time to indulge in my passion to paint. I find myself feeling jealous of the famous artists who are leading very glamorous lives. Sometimes I really feel like giving up to do a normal ordinary 9-5 job and feel good about myself, marry a simple girl and settle down into blissful harmony. Is life worth the struggle? Please guide me.

Sukhinder, Jallandhar

My dear boy, life is always worth the struggle provided you know what you want. It is only when you are not sure of you own self that you start wondering about your own sense of direction. Look back and see, did you grow up hearing that artists barely make a square living, sometimes these negative messages leave an indelible impression on our minds which creates a whole negative pattern within us. You should thank God for your creative talents, how many people are so blessed? Just be sure of yourself, give-up the struggle within and please throw jealousy out of the window. There is plenty for everyone in this world, just learn to rejoice in the success of others. Make your life joyful by trying to enjoy every moment of it. As you see yourself opening to life, your direction and will shall definitely get stronger.

Rush in your queries to Renee at lifestyle@tribunemail.com or care of Lifestyle, The Tribune, Sector 29-C, Chandigarh

Laugh away your blues
Sunil Manocha

HAVE a good giggle or two till your tummy aches and your mood elevates. If you haven’t done that, try it. You may probably even laugh your way out of a cry. Well, that’s the philosophy behind laughter clubs, operating throughout the country. Besides promising a chunk of health and mood enhancement, laughter refreshes the body and soul and can cure more than 70% of illnesses—heart disease, depression, tension, high BP, headaches, stomach ailments and so on. And considering these benefits of laughter, laughter therapy has sprung up.

Pouring forth a volley of chuckles and gurgles is no longer funny! Yes, thanks to the likes of Dr. Madan Kataria, laughing is a serious business now. Fondly called the ‘Guru of giggling,’ this merry medicine man from India, has developed a new technique of laughter therapy based on Yoga. Besides having authored ‘Laugh for no reason,’ this man has established more than 4000 laughter clubs in India and abroad.

“The laughter club is a joint effort of like-minded people to liberate laughter and happiness from reason,” explains Kataria, adding, “Each laughter session starts with deep breathing and a Ho Ho, Ha Ha exercise and clapping followed by spontaneous laughter.

This Chandigarian believes the popularity of laughter clubs has gone up rapidly for physiological and psychological benefits. Laughter helps relieve stress, anxiety, work pressure, reduces diabetes, migraine, blood pressure, improves oxygen supply and blood circulation. One might be stiff to begin with, but then loosens up in a few minutes. Finally, everyone goes back energised and happy.

Chandigarh Zindabad
Sreedhara Bhasin

Chandigarh folks do not know (and luckily so) the joys and anguish of morchas and street protests. Me – on the other hand, having spent my entire childhood and youth in Calcutta, possess an ocean of knowledge in that matter. The other day, I was in sector 17 and there was a supposed protest going on – bunches of people squatting under a banyan tree listening to a skinny man shouting away into an ancient microphone. The words – I picked up from his speech – instantly jogged my memory cells. Words from my childhood were floating out – “ sarkari zulum, janta ka haq, gaddi chodo, Shramik jaago,” and many other choicest epithets that I have heard in street corners everyday – growing up. Of course, in my time – imperialism, capitalism, establishment, exploitation – these were also the words that were up for grabs.

I listened to the speech and shuddered, for I remember the ferocity with which these morchas would paralyze the city. Sometimes, our school bus would reach late, for traffic was hung for hours. Some days, people would walk to office for nothing could ply. Sometimes, we would sit in our vehicle and see interminable processions going by and pray desperately that we would reach the examination hall in time.

As I walked to the car, I looked around with anxiety to see if a crowd was gathering. To my utter relief, no one seemed to pay any attention. The shoe-shine boys were polishing off, while the chatwalla looked least bothered. Most pedestrians couldn’t care less and most shoppers were not even aware that a speech was in progress.

This is a sign of a beautiful city. The days when Jan Marg is closed (the road that intersects Matka Chowk at Madhya Marg) because of some - as my daughter calls them - “zindabad-murdabad” folks protesting on the broad avenue – we casually take a detour and feel no fear that we are going to miss our show in Fun Republic!

Chandigarh is a jewel city in a chaotic country. We enjoy some of the finest things in the world here – a magnificent lake, real flowering trees, wide open spaces, air that is still breathable, streets that are still clean, chowks that are adorned with flowers and roads that actually take you from point A to B with amazing alacrity. Also, it is the only city, where I have seen horse carts being driven alongside a gleaming Mercedes and milk is being carried in iron canisters on a motor bike, where children actually play holi in old style and people have lawns with amazing flowers and bikes are still a valid mode of transportation.

Are we trying hard enough to take care of our beautiful city?

Capturing stillness

Landscapes do not fascinate her. For, gushing water cutting its way through the vastness of running mountains reminds her of the society’s mad race against fleeting time, and all the uncertainties that accompany it.

That is, perhaps, the reason why city-based artist Suman Jowel prefers to capture still life on the canvas of her mind before painting it with watercolor. Her exhibition on still life at the Fun Republic concluded last week.

“Still life has a strong element of certainty about it. Unlike other transient aspects of nature, it is permanent and has continuity that gives you a sense of warmth and comfort,” she asserts. “You see, an individual bird may make its final exit from the world, but the genus continues. No wonder, I have a preference for painting chirping birds, flowers, fruits and other stuff surrounding life, instead of chuckling mountains rushing from one end to another”.

Jowel also likes immortalising people in her portraits. “As permanence is possible only in a work of art, I try to defeat the time by capture people on the canvas before the passing years play havoc with him. For portraits, Jowel prefers colour pencil. “It is a medium of expression for me. Direct application of colour through easy-to-use pencil helps me in confining the hues of experience in deep furrows on visages”.

But for paintings, she uses not only soft and colour pencils, but also acrylics, water colours, oil and even charcoal. “The freshness of water colour is a constant source of inspiration for me, she asserts with a smile.

— Saurabh Malik

Bodycare — the herbal way

Fabindia today announced the launch of Fabindia Sana — a range of authentic, effective Bodycare products. The Fabindia Sana range includes soaps, shampoos, hair oils, pure oils, moisturisers, body scrubs, face packs, hair conditioners and specialised skin and face care products.  

According to Ms. Diltaj Grewal, Manager, Fab India, Chandigarh, “The Fabindia Sana range effectively marries traditional formulations, ayurvedic knowledge and natural ingredients with close quality control and affordable prices for our discerning customers. The new range is a natural extension of our commitment to offer excellent quality natural and environment-friendly products to our customers.”  

Fabindia has set up its own Research and Development Lab with a technical quality consultant and technicians. It is here that the formulations are developed and tested thoroughly before being finalised for production. While the emphasis definitely is on the most natural and effective compositions, product quality is watched closely. The formulations are compliant with the Drugs & Cosmetics Act, 1940 and the specifications are laid down according to ISI Standards.

A prominent garments and home furnishings brand, Fabindia was started in 1960 by John Bissell as a vehicle to market the vast and diverse craft traditions of India and thereby helps fulfill the need to provide and sustain rural employment. Fabindia’s endeavour is to blend indigenous craft techniques with contemporary designs to bring aesthetic and affordable products to today’s consumers, providing them with hand crafted products,. which help support and encourage good craftsmanship.

Fabindia’s products are sourced largely from villages all over India while working closely with artisans by providing various inputs including design, quality control, access to raw materials and production coordination.Extending this philosophy to farmers in the country, Fabindia launched a range of Organic food products in 2004. Bodycare products, drawing from traditional recipes and Ayurveda, were a natural next step.—TNS

FUN WITH FASHION
Romancing your looks
Anandita Gupta

Romance isn’t always birdsong and dew drenched Daffodils. Nor is it just Mills and Boons, chocolates and teddy bears. And neither is it solely the sparkling rivers dotting the mighty mountains. Romance can also spring from your personality, from what you wear. And when it comes to diving head on into the pool of romance, what else would be perfect than splashing yourself up in some zesty summer wear? Let’s delve deep into some of the coolest options available in town.

Romantic clothing doesn’t have to equal frills and froth alone. The mood could also be enhanced by other parts of your attire—Colour, a delicate detail, flared sleeves, laced trimmings, wrinkled-ruffled look, puff sleeves and sheer tunics. Here’s how to embrace each of these and get smitten by Cupid, no less.

Flare fare-No buttons to do, no cuffs to close and no maintenance hassles. Simple cuts, an easy fall and an uncluttered neckline. What’s more, this loose flowing top has all the romance hidden in its easy-to-maintain sleeves, that conceal, yet reveal. Yes, for all those gals who wanna show off their waxed arms, without getting them tanned, these tops are the thing. For these are the usual tops with flared sleeves in linen, georgettes and wispy chiffons. As they twirl and swirl with the flowing breeze, they weave around a spell of romance. After all, what typifies the light-hearted spirit better than the flowing and flared silhouettes?

Tunic top/kurti-This wispy, light and flowing piece of clothing, that hobnobs with vibrant hues and bold embellishments, is making waves both nationally and internationally. Initially, it was only found in fabrics like cotton, chicken and Khadi. But today, a tunic (read kurti) is being created in delicate Georgettes and crisp crepes, besides silks and tissues. Plus, a lot of contemporary styling has gone into it. We have deeper necklines, higher slits, daring colours and rich work in it. And then, there are those stones, sequins, swarovskies, beads, threads and pearls that add that extra touch of opulence to this flowing delight. With Shahrukh Khan having trotted around in a Manish Malhotra designed Chicken-embroidered transparent kurti, even men seem keen on having it in their wardrobes. Even internationally, labels like Gap, Wills and Banana Republic are retailing in transparent kurtis on a large scale.

Ruffled-wrinkled shirts-From comfort clothing stashed in the closet for those lean staying-home afternoons, it’s evolved as a glamorous eveningwear spelling sheer glamour and style. The luxurious palette in which the shirts are being designed nowadays is perfect to celebrate the exuberance and energy of the breezy evenings. Being designed in cotton, chicken, linen, crepes and even tusser silks, they make a sizzling style statement. Wear them and let your admirers’ eyes meander through their ruffles and wrinkles.

Colour- There’s nothing more refreshingly romantic than getting drenched in vibrant hues. And for getting laced with romance, flirting with pastels seems like the best bet. Powder blues, peony pinks, lemony limes and dusty mauves can instantly build up that misty air of romance. Play with light and reflection by making a heady cocktail of colours like white, yellow and beige. Sprinkle some silvery glitter to these and you have a fairy-tale-attire.

A delicate detail-Sometimes, just a little thing does the trick. It could be a tiny butterfly brooch hung in the middle of your cross over top, a frilly little scarf tucked away in your belt and even a net laced stocking playing peak-a-boo under your knee-length skirt. Fluffy puffed sleeves added to a fitted top can also work wonders for letting romance bounce off your waist and frolic around your arms.Laced trimmings-If you wanna look like a dainty darling, by enhancing your super girlie appeal, embrace lace. A lace corset is sure to look sensual by virtue of its sheerness. Satin can be used as a base for lace for a royal feel. Some of the colours that could be seen glowing hypnotically through lace are nude, turquoise, pink, silver, oyster pearl grey and ivory with metallic shimmer effects.

Sleepless in Chandigarh
Anandita Gupta

AS the dusk softly gathers up the City Beautiful in its snug arms; some houses in the city seem to be at their most radiant selves. Flickering candles, fancy mesh-lights, festooned flowers and festivity frolicking at every nook and corner. As one steps inside, what meets the eye is some delightful devotion, charmingly dappled with some joie de verve!

Sprawled on the ground is a swarm of devotees, swaying merrily to the music around. Their faces glimmering under the light of the wavering candles, some of them raise their arms and exclaim, “Jai mata di.” And further rekindling this flame of devotion are a group of singers, who take charge one by one and puff out their chests to sing sweet songs of devotion…Aaj jagrata hai!

Yes, the trend of holding Jagratas is really catching up in the city. Mostly being conducted by people in their households by erecting shamiyans in their lawns or nearby parks, these devotional affairs are fast getting draped in opulent splendour. “Jagratas in the city are being organised with much fanfare. Right from spending Rs. 2100 to Rs. 21000, the city people are doing it all. Like we recently organised a Jagrata in which we had lavish snacks, dinner by Jagota caterers and the hawan decorated by professionals,” informs Sunaina of Sector 9, Panchkula. Adds Raghbir Chand, another devi devotee, “Many people nowadays are vouching for Chonki Bharna, which is a Jagrata that concludes by 11pm.But the real flavour of divinity sprinkles from the one that goes on the whole night.”

“For the uninitiated, a Jagrata involves a family pooja and lighting the jyot followed by singing of the bhajans and devotional songs amidst the devotees dancing and enjoying coffee and light snacks. Some kids in the family are also dressed up as Hindu Gods and they dance to the tune of divine songs. Finally, the story of sisters Rukman and Tara Rani is narrated and the Prasad distributed before the celebration is signed off with a Mata’s Aarti,” informs Vikram Bansal, running his advertising firm in the city.

So, all those of you who’re worried or down in the dumps, just don your religious spirits and get drenched in devotion.

My life, my story
Saurabh Malik

Dr Jaideep Singh Chadha with his book Please mom this is my life
Telling Tale: Dr Jaideep Singh Chadha with his book Please mom this is my life — Photo by Vinay Malik

You do not need a stethoscope to learn what’s in his heart. It’s written clearly on the cover of an anthology of short stories doctored by the city-based cardiologist, Dr Jaideep Singh Chadha. The book, “Please mom! This is my life”, was released at the Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, as a part of the Alumini Association celebrations. Posing for a photograph with a copy of the book at the Chandigarh Golf Club on Saturday afternoon, Dr Chadha says the book is all about the youth of today. “They think they have seen it all. But I think the need of the hour is to remind them that life today is not just limited to their experiences. There is much more beyond it,” he says.

“They do not realise that the life span is decreasing, while the stress level is increasing. And then, you have the early onset of hypertension, diabetes, depression and then circumstances combining together to end up in suicides…” He adds: Through stories and anecdotes in the book, I have basically tried to tell youngsters that too much of emphasis on materialism, and the desire to do well, irrespective of the ill-effects was basically resulting in a rat race in which no one emerged victorious”. The book is third in the series. So far, Mumbai-born Dr Chadha has written The Other Side of Golf and novel Vinculum. He was recently awarded with the Vijay Rattan award. Just in case you are not very familiar with his name, Dr Chadha did his graduation from the Indira Gandhi Medical College at Shimla before doing his post-graduation in internal medicine from the PGIMER in Chandigarh.

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