CHANDIGARH INDEX

 





FAMOUS FOUR
Forget Enid Blyton’s Famous Five and Secret Seven. Here are four young city boys who are all set to take you to a chilling and thrilling journey through the woods, reports Parbina Rashid
I
t all started with a mother’s desperate effort to keep her son indoors in this scorching heat. She even gave in to his demand of inviting his two best friends over at her Sector 34 home for the day. However, young Jonathan Ivan Charles ended up playing host to his childhood friends Saurav Dutta and Satya Prateek not just for one day, but for three days.

GETTING IT RIGHT: Ajay, Satya, Saurav and Jonathan (from left to right) at the rehersal before a scene. (Below) Director S.K. Sinha and cameraman Sanjay Bhatnagar in action. 
Ajay, Satya, Saurav and Jonathan at the rehersal before a scene. Director S.K. Sinha and cameraman Sanjay Bhatnagar in action



Visual delights
Gayatri Rajwade
A
celebration of visual imagery, of rich imagination and vibrant art forms crisscrossing diverse mediums — paintings in mixed media, drawings in charcoal, pen and ink, water-colours, wood-cuts, serigraphs, photographs, graphics and sculptures — brings up the annual art exhibition of 77 works of art by the Chandigarh Lalit Kala Akademi in collaboration with the Government Museum and Art Gallery-10.



UNITED IN ART: As many as 77 works of art are on display at the Government Museum and Art Gallery. — Photo by Vinay Malik
As many as 77 works of art are on display at the Government Museum and Art Gallery

Paper & Pottery
D.S. Kapoor
M
eet Tejpal, a 40-plus artist, is passionate about what he does. He works for 18 hours a day and churns out colourful paper sculptures. He thinks work is just like an inspiration for him and the life thereafter becomes exciting and worth living. Tejpal’s specialty lies in folding the paper geometrically and the outcome is three-dimensional forms. For Tejpal, paper is as strong a medium as clay, which can be molded into any circular forms like pottery. These paper-folding forms are created from a single paper. Each form has its own aesthetic shape undiminished by sharp line contour, control of hand and mind and vital control is absolutely developed by mental strength attained through meditation.

Talent unfolds
E
xpect layering, sophisticated mismatches and visual drama in clothes at the Friday evening fashion show which is all set to display the talent of NIIFT’s graduating students, says Saurabh Malik after having a look at yards of colourful fabric Swirls of fabric, reverberating music, waves of cheerful colours causing ripples and sparkling crystals cascading down the alluring dresses like twinkling stars shining against the dark backdrop…. You just cannot ask for more.

SCORCHING: The models are here to showcase local talent. — Photo by Manoj Mahajan

The models are here to showcase local talent

Homecoming
Gayatri Rajwade
W
hen Rusty decided to come to India to look for her family she landed in Chandigarh! Now one may well ask who Rusty is and what this has to do with anything. For the uninitiated, the answers rest with Sony Entertainment Television’s saga Aisa Des Hai Mera, whose main protagonist is Rusty, aka newcomer Saumya Tandon.

Bon Voyage
Gayatri Rajwade
D
ecouvrir La France — Discover France, said a competition organised by the Embassy of France in India in March this year and 22-year-old Chandigarh-based youngster Ankur Jain decided to do just that. The competition, open to students willing to roll around in French and rattle off coherent phases saw more than a hundred entries coming in and trickling down to four final winners.

CAMPUS CAFE
Sun protection factor
S
corching summer sun has achieved what the Chandigarh Police could not. Beating relentlessly, it has forced so many girls on Panjab University and college campuses to wear crash helmets. Right guys! All those sunscreens and fairness lotions are just not enough for the dames negotiating the sharp curves of life on the road to fashion in the summers of 2006. For them, nothing less than protective headgear to safeguard their complexion will suffice. Having doubts? Just drive down the road finding its way through Panjab University’s academic environs. You will find flappers of the world hovering around the students centre on their single cylinder flying machines called scooters in snazzy flip-up and full-face helmets.

YOUTH SPEAK
Youth find peace in spirituality
S
pirituality is playing a vital role in the lives of the youth these days. Leading a good life has taken a new meaning. Of course, it still means having lots of money and finding lots of ways to spend it, but increasingly, the youth is also waking up to the power of the spiritual instead of just material wealth. Seeking solutions to issues that come with turbo-charged lifestyles, the young and the restless have discovered new mantras - yoga, pranayam, chanting and meditation. They are seeking the true meaning of life through these methods.

NEW RELEASES
A filmmaker’s confession
P
ritish Nandy Communications presents Ankahee starring Aftab Shivdasani, Esha Deol and Ameesha Patel. This one is a bold movie directed by Vikram Bhatt who chooses to tell a story that is very much close to his heart. It is a untold account of extra-marital relationship.

Strategy for a kitchen
T
hroughout the years kitchens have evolved based on the needs, demands and lifestyles of the family and in today’s family on the move, the kitchen must be able to multi-task as well. No longer is the kitchen simply a room in the home where food is prepared. By taking advantage of the numerous options and amenities available today in kitchen furniture and appliances you can give your kitchen vibrancy and life. Let’s plan to maximise the utility of our kitchen this week.






FAMOUS FOUR
Forget Enid Blyton’s Famous Five and Secret Seven. Here are four young city boys who are all set to take you to a chilling and thrilling journey through the woods, reports Parbina Rashid

It all started with a mother’s desperate effort to keep her son indoors in this scorching heat. She even gave in to his demand of inviting his two best friends over at her Sector 34 home for the day. However, young Jonathan Ivan Charles ended up playing host to his childhood friends Saurav Dutta and Satya Prateek not just for one day, but for three days. And what conspired behind the closed door of Jonathan’s room is nothing short of a movie script.

The beginning

“It all started with our wish to do something adventurous. But since it was not possible to be physically adventurous in this heat, we poured our heart and soul in this script,” says Jonathan. This one-and-a-half-hour-long script evolved as three of them poured their fantasy with a heavy dose of moralistic values.

We chat with these three writers, barely in their teens, (Jonathan has completed Class X, Saurav is in Plus One and Satya is doing Plus Two). From their bits and pieces emerges a story which can give our Bollywood writers a run for their money.

This is a story about four boys, three of them (Sam, Ron and Nick), rich and spoilt, who take the luxuries of life for granted. Next comes Pete, the middle class boy, who takes his three friends to a camping trip. Things starts happening. They lose their way in the forest, get separated from each other, learn to cope up with life and finally come out of it wiser and humble, only to find out that Pete had tricked them into the situation just to make them realise what life is all about.

Light, camera, action

Once the script was ready, next came the filming. Jonathan, who had earlier made some money by selling his music album (he wrote, composed and sang for his debut album Praise the Lord), took out his savings and together they formed a team to take a loan from various places. A director and a cameraman were chosen and Ajay, the fourth member, was also found.

“We have already shot about 60 per cent of the script,” says Jonathan. The team has chosen locales like Timber Trail, Shimla, Manali and Chandigarh. What is more, this one- and-a-half-hour-long plot has three songs and a couple of tracks, written and composed by the team again.

The christening came much later. Once director S.K. Sinha, a theatre person by hobby but a lawyer by profession, and cameraman Sanjay Bhatnagar, who has the experience of working as an assistant cameraman in a couple of Bollywood projects and is now largely involved in filming educational projects, were brought in, the naming ceremony took place and finally their 30-page project got the name Secrets of the Woods.

The hindsight

Now that the major hard work is over, it is time to sit down and reflect. So how was the experience? “Great,” all four chorus. “From day one, this project gave us something meaningful to do. While doing the research on these characters, we realised our own virtues and vices and it has turned us into more mature and realistic human beings,” says Jonathan and all three agree with him.

“This project also formed a bond among us which is quite unique,” say Satya, Saurabh and Ajay. “And the fun that we shared while working is something that will remain etched in our minds for the rest of our lives,” they hasten to add. It is not difficult to imagine — camping around, getting chased by a herd of goats and all that stuff.

Expert comment

That was all about creativity and fun. But what do the experts feel? “They are a bunch of wonderful kids whose enthusiasm is simply infectious,” says director Sinha. “They are so involved with the whole thing and work with such dedication that it has been a learning experience working with them,” he adds.

“Yes, they are smart kids and all of them have acting experience on stage,” says cameraman Bhatnagar. “All I have to do is give them little tips on how to face the camera for a particular shot and they do it well,” he adds. Though the team is filming it with a digital camera, both Sinha and Bhatnagar are optimistic that the outcome will be good. “It is a high resolution camera and we are planning high-end editing and digital transfer to have a great affect,” says Bhatnagar.

The end

Though after interacting with all those Bollywood personalities, we have learnt not to ask filmmakers about the climax of their film before its release, we cannot help but ask these kids about their secret.

“Though the film ends with the reunion of the four friends, we are going to make it an interactive end,” says Jonathan. “We are planning to print one lakh pamphlets asking about one’s vices which will be distributed among students. Once they list their vices we will gather them and bury them in one place and put a tombstone on top. Imagine so many vices will be buried on a single day,” explains Jonathan with his childlike innocence. We are left speechless. Who says wisdom has anything to do with age? 

Visual delights
Gayatri Rajwade

A celebration of visual imagery, of rich imagination and vibrant art forms crisscrossing diverse mediums — paintings in mixed media, drawings in charcoal, pen and ink, water-colours, wood-cuts, serigraphs, photographs, graphics and sculptures — brings up the annual art exhibition of 77 works of art by the Chandigarh Lalit Kala Akademi in collaboration with the Government Museum and Art Gallery-10.

The jury comprising the eminent Dr B. N. Goswamy and Siddharth awarded eight students and four professionals apart from commending six others for their artistic endeavours amongst a plethora of works submitted.

Picture Perfect

Anand Shinde’s four-part composition in bright dry pastels picked up the award in the painting category while Sanjay Kumar’s robust graphic ‘wood-cut’ got the award in the graphics category. S. M. Dhami’s symphony of a pile of haystacks in ‘Field Landscape—II’ was adjudged the best photograph in the category and finally Gauri Sharma’s pen and ink ‘My Diary’ (pages literally torn out of one!) stood out for its opulent eloquence full of scenes from life which also came in for fulsome praise by Delhi-based senior artist Jagdish Dey who called it a “coming together of a strong composition.”

Budding Compositions

Megha Katyal’s untitled work, invigorating for its recipe of fabric mingling with sewing machines and worked on with acrylic and Sonia Chaudhary’s ‘Scattered Memories’ in oil pastels received the painting award jointly.

Ravi Prakash’s ‘Dog’ in dry point picked up the award in the graphics segment.

Jaswinder Singh, a second year student at the College of Art, was awarded for his sculpture ‘Innovation’ in wood and stone and came in for admiration from senior painter, print-maker K. R. Subbanna. “Simple and beautiful, visually, aesthetically and creatively, the carved effect gives is an interesting appeal and it is a piece that even a layman can appreciate.”

Vikas Bhardwaj’s unusual composition ‘In my Blanket’ in black ink and Harkanwal Kaur’s water – colour ‘Barsat Ke Baad’ received the awards in the painting category.

Sarvesh Kumar and Mala Goyal’s untitled photographs, both vastly different from each other, the former a play of light and shadow and the latter a contemporary look at light through a point, were awarded in the photography segment.

Commendations

Bhumika Sharma’s lyrical bronze sculpture, Vibhuti Jain’s depth of focus in her photograph, ‘Let There Be Light’, the nostalgia in Reeti Brar’s photograph of Baddi (in Himachal Pradesh), Rohit Bagga’s untitled graphic wood-cut, Shiven Tanwar’s strong and expressive work ‘End of Days—II’ and Guriqbal Singh’s curious serigraphy ‘Flamboyant’ all came in for commendations.

…And Finally

The awards do not take away from the other works of art on display and several surpass ordinary metaphors to delight. Parminder Singh’s ‘Space’, Pramod K. Arya’s meaningful water-colour, ‘Midnight Story’, Satwinder Singh’s poignant ‘Handicapped Dream’, Pooja Vohra’s interesting photograph ‘Celebrating Aloneness’ of a pair of feet covered in sand and R C Singla’s fascinating ink drawing which catches the eye for its finedetailing.

Raja Jaikrishen’s moving articulation of his home, Kashmir, in ‘Valley in Crucible’ and Vinay Malik’s arresting top-shot of a girl lying on a bed of water-melons with an multi-coloured umbrella adding to the colourful allure are discerning compositions though vastly different in form and style.

Ram Pratap Verma’s oil on canvas of a female face in shadow, Somnath Dikpati’s splendid water-colour ‘Dark Lane’, Akash Gaur’s absorbing woodcut print ‘Perspective Less Life’, Lakhwinder Singh’s lithograph ‘Beauty in Mud’ is all worth a dekko.

The exhibition is on till May 24 at the Government Museum and Art Gallery, Sector 10 from 10 am to 7 pm.

Paper & Pottery
D.S. Kapoor

Tejpal with his creations
POETRY IN PAPER:Tejpal with his creations

Meet Tejpal, a 40-plus artist, is passionate about what he does. He works for 18 hours a day and churns out colourful paper sculptures. He thinks work is just like an inspiration for him and the life thereafter becomes exciting and worth living.

Tejpal’s specialty lies in folding the paper geometrically and the outcome is three-dimensional forms. For Tejpal, paper is as strong a medium as clay, which can be molded into any circular forms like pottery. These paper-folding forms are created from a single paper. Each form has its own aesthetic shape undiminished by sharp line contour, control of hand and mind and vital control is absolutely developed by mental strength attained through meditation.

The art of paper folding is a new concept and requires technical specialty. These paper folding are made with some technical expertise developed by him. Tejpal has been practicing countless forms for his satisfaction and own pleasure to keep this art alive.

He draws his inspiration and sensibility from nature.

According to him various forms, shapes, moods as emotional entities can be captured in the art of paper folding.

Son of a retired Railway Officer, Tejpal had his schooling at Gorakhpur. In spite of his education in Commerce, it is the art and creativity which he hooked his interest. After the retirement of his father he was shifted to Mohali with his family in 1988 and joined a public sector undertaking. He left his job and started paper cutting. Thousands of his motifs and ornamental designs are stencil cut which were executed by the students of the NIFD in creating fashion and textile designs. He also introduced a new concept in paper weaving in circular and oval shapes, which were further executed on garments by the students of the NIFD.

The technique of paper folding has a bright future if the same designs are applied on cut glass or crystal. Unfortunately there are very few artists with this skill. Tejpal is willing to teach this art to willing students. 

Talent unfolds

Tina Chatwal to walk ramp

Get ready to be dazzled. Among the models in Chandigarh for bringing out the best is Tina Chatwal. Right folks, she walked the ramp along with top Indian models like Amrita Thappar, Sindhura Gadde and Vidisha Pavate, along with Tapur and Tupur during Satya Paul’s launch in New York. 

Expect layering, sophisticated mismatches and visual drama in clothes at the Friday evening fashion show which is all set to display the talent of NIIFT’s graduating students, says Saurabh Malik after having a look at yards of colourful fabric Swirls of fabric, reverberating music, waves of cheerful colours causing ripples and sparkling crystals cascading down the alluring dresses like twinkling stars shining against the dark backdrop…. You just cannot ask for more.

Right guys! Gala is the word to describe the prêt “design collection” to be showcased by the students of Mohali’s Northern India Institute of Fashion Technology (NIIFT) during a fashion show at Kalagram on Friday. Expected to commence at 7.30 pm, the show — Anu-Kama — will see Punjab’s Deputy Chief Minister Rajinder Kaur Bhattal as the chief guest.

As you push your way through the impressive glass door of a Sector 17 hotel for a preview of the institute’s talent, you have no idea that the final semester students of fashion design, along with those of knitwear design and technology, can actually weave magic out of garments.

In fact, their anthology of garbs with poetic charm has an unpredictable and dramatic look. Some of it is the reinvention of the classics with layering and random prints overstating the old to give you that contemporary look. In fact, the clothes bring out the sheer magnificence of hard work.

The range, richly embellished with semi-precious stones, crystals and even sequins, is vibrant, wearable and full of life. Rather, the collection has everything from “Ramdulari ka biyah” to the “exotic experience of a safari”.

Giving details of the fashion show, NIIFT Director Vijay Sharma says every student passing out of the institute will present a collection of five to seven ensembles. In all, Anu-Kama will showcase 55 collections.

The range of formal and semi-formal clothing, she asserts, has been exclusively crafted for the show by the graduating students after endless months of toil and sweat.

For displaying the flair before the floodlights, glam brigade of models all the way from Delhi and other places will walk the ramp. Among the high-flying are Krishna, Lakshmi, Mansvi, Tina Chatwal, Anjala, Sucheta Sharma, Lou Gill, Latika, Suneel Maan, Anuj Sharma and Pardeep. This is not the end of it. Distinguished choreographer Harmeet Bajaj will lend charm to the show.

Just in case you do not know much about the institute, the Punjab Government venture was established in 1995. At present, it is offering courses in fashion design, textile design, garment manufacturing technology, knitwear design and technology, fashion retail management, besides fashion design and clothing technology. 

Homecoming
Gayatri Rajwade

Kanwaljit and Saumya
IN THEIR DES: Kanwaljit and Saumya. — Photo by Manoj Mahajan

When Rusty decided to come to India to look for her family she landed in Chandigarh! Now one may well ask who Rusty is and what this has to do with anything. For the uninitiated, the answers rest with Sony Entertainment Television’s saga Aisa Des Hai Mera, whose main protagonist is Rusty, aka newcomer Saumya Tandon.

And the fulsome threesome of Saumya, her onscreen father actor Kanwaljeet and writer/director Lekh Tandon popped by for a brief visit to the city that makes their serial go round!

Dream Venture

For Lekh Tandon, veteran of films and television serials (Agar Tum Na Hote, Dulhan Wohi Jo Piya Man Bhaye and Phir Wahi Talaash on Doordarshan), this was a dream come true. “The story is about all of us, our values and culture. I am only telling it in an interesting way, that is all.” Interesting is also how Saumya got the part. “During the audition, Lekhji explained the story to me, gave me a situation and asked me to script and act out the scene for him,” she smiles still incredulous at how it all happened.

Rusty Tells All…

Attractive, peachy and blond to the core (we suspect it’s a wig), Saumya completed her MBA, won the Femina Cover Girl contest for being “a pretty face” and suddenly discovered ad campaigns which led her to Mumbai and onto the sets, in a blink. “I was planning to join theatre and wanted to do a Shakespearean play when the serial happened.”

What prompted her to take it up? “The relationship between a father and a daughter is so beautiful, so unusual and it has not been explored enough,” she smiles. This along with a chance to delve into being in a small town in the serial (nostalgia stemming from having grown up in Ujjain) she waxes eloquent about the virtues of a small place. “In big cities you miss out on the innocence and the leisure and that is what I cherish the most from my days in Ujjain.”

Now, working 16 to 18 hours a day, “40 days in a month,” it is time spent alone, doing her own thing, that she misses most. Does she find the acting part difficult? “Not really, I was confident from the beginning except for the accent which is such a pain but we shall shed that soon,” she laughs.

Any final takes? “Glamour is not glamorous,” she smiles prettily, “but the fans, their enthusiasm, their wanting to take me home and feed me (the serial begins with showing her as sad and poor!), is really wonderful.”

...And ‘Father’s’ Take

Saving the best for the last, in this instance Kanwaljeet, delights with his candid chat, flooring the ladies present.

Still very handsome, the years have only added to his appeal as they have to the variety of roles that he has played. “Earlier when I was playing the lead I was singing my own songs, but now as a character artist I find I have time on my hands.” Time to work in daily serials like this and dip into movies too, “I have two Punjabi films one with Manmohan Singh and a Hindi film, ‘Bombay to Paris’ coming up.” Apart from this there is Purab Paschim on Doordarshan and of course Aisa Des Hai Mera.

Is there a role left that he would like to sink his teeth into? “I have always wanted to play a psychopath and I am hoping someone will find that streak in me,” he laughs

For this man who does not watch any television or movies (save for CNBC, for he dabbles in shares), life is a placid stream of a “game of tennis from 6 to 8 pm everyday, a couple of drinks with the family and that’s it!”

A Jat Sikh (the name is Sidhu) from Gurdaspur, he has actually grown up everywhere but in Punjab. “All my firsts happened in Saharanpur so I believe I am from there.”

So have the years been good to him? “I believe I have only achieved 15 per cent of what I want to do. Even now I allow myself to dream and have always walked by the moonlight and will see the dawn.” Ah, the charm of a philosophising actor. Didn’t we say the best for the last? 

Bon Voyage
Gayatri Rajwade

Ankur Jain
FRANCE BOUND: Ankur Jain

Decouvrir La France — Discover France, said a competition organised by the Embassy of France in India in March this year and 22-year-old Chandigarh-based youngster Ankur Jain decided to do just that. The competition, open to students willing to roll around in French and rattle off coherent phases saw more than a hundred entries coming in and trickling down to four final winners.

Of course, you had to be a part of one of the 14 centres of Alliance Française around India and between the ages of 18 and 25 years to be eligible to apply.

The prize — four winners from all over India get a chance to visit France for 10 days in August exploring the Aquitaine region in the South-Eastern part of the country.

The competition, which comprised three rounds, saw 15 contestants from Chandigarh competing with each other in the dictation round. The second round involved an oral discussion with a jury and finally a story had to be sent as part of the student’s file to the headquarters in Mumbai for the final selection.

Ankur, the only student chosen from the city, wrote a detective story, ‘On the Steps of Mr LC’, and what got him the second position was the connection he made between France and India through Le Corbusier’s architecture in Chandigarh and the structures he built in Firminy (which incidentally is the second largest accomplishment of the French architect after our city).

Writing a story in an alien language is impressive enough but Ankur is very modest about it all. “French has been my passion for a long time. In fact, I am doing my graduation in French Honours privately from IGNOU and pursuing a diploma in French from Alliance Française in Chandigarh.” He has recently appeared for his 9th level exams.

“It was on my grandfather’s advice that I took up French. He said it would open up new horizons for me and it really has,” smiles Ankur.

Ankur visited the museum to gather information on Corbusier’s structures, researched the Net, checked out libraries and wrote the story out in one week flat.

The story does not end at detective tales; Ankur also writes poems in French and if that is not all, wants to pursue a career dabbling in French. 

CAMPUS CAFE
Sun protection factor

Scorching summer sun has achieved what the Chandigarh Police could not. Beating relentlessly, it has forced so many girls on Panjab University and college campuses to wear crash helmets. Right guys! All those sunscreens and fairness lotions are just not enough for the dames negotiating the sharp curves of life on the road to fashion in the summers of 2006. For them, nothing less than protective headgear to safeguard their complexion will suffice.

Having doubts? Just drive down the road finding its way through Panjab University’s academic environs. You will find flappers of the world hovering around the students centre on their single cylinder flying machines called scooters in snazzy flip-up and full-face helmets.

In vogue are the ones covering the visage. True, they may not be a part of their wardrobe. But at the same time the helmets form an integral ingredient of summer fashion accessory, undoubtedly. “Gone are days when biker girls would wrap up their fair faces with cheerful scarves,” says under-grad Ritu Nanda. “Today, they ride on the fast lane of life wearing helmets that protect their faces from sun’s onslaught, and head from injuries”.

Well girls, just in case you haven’t picked up a helmet, chin up. Wear your attitude by going in for headgear coated with chip-proof paint. You can also go in for helmets with scratch-proof visors by pulling out anywhere between Rs 750 and Rs 3,000. Flip-up helmets, with chin guard lifting facility, are hot favourites amidst the youngsters.

But before you ride on the hearts of city guys with a helmet on, just make sure that it fits you properly. It should not loosely dangle around your head as you zoom your way to glory. Remember to go in for the ones that fit nicely and properly, preferably with an ISI mark.

Replace your helmet if you have picked it up from a roadside vendor. Chances are that the helmet is not having foam liner in it. In its absence, you can suffer severe damage to your head. In case it is there, make sure that the foam is thick enough for adequate protection.

Also, change you helmet if has crashed. Even if the headgear appears to be undamaged, buy a new one. “The reason is not hard to see,” says helmet dealer Ravi Sharma. “Foam that forms core part of the helmet is designed to be used just once. After the crash, the foam can no longer offer appropriate protection”.

In any case, the manufactures now recommend that helmets older than five years should be replaced with newer ones. So all you guys and gals still adventuring without protection, pick up flamboyant helmets that are superior in weight, ventilation and comfort.

Success excess

Success exerts a pull on hard work! The news of about 20 candidates from this part of the region studying their way to the civil services has encouraged so many more to work harder for the examinations. If you are having any doubts, just go to the main library in the Panjab University campus. You will find so many students burning up their breakfast calories while preparing for the examinations.

Flipping through the journals and reference books, they do not even have time to grumble about the heat and restless summers. Even in the evenings, you will find the students holding round table conferences discussing the factors leading to the revolt of 1857, or tearing apart Archimedes’ principle. For them, just a mug of coffee available in the kiosk just outside the library is enough to keep the energy levels up.

—Saurabh Malik

YOUTH SPEAK
Youth find peace in spirituality

Shikha DavessarSpirituality is playing a vital role in the lives of the youth these days. Leading a good life has taken a new meaning. Of course, it still means having lots of money and finding lots of ways to spend it, but increasingly, the youth is also waking up to the power of the spiritual instead of just material wealth. Seeking solutions to issues that come with turbo-charged lifestyles, the young and the restless have discovered new mantras - yoga, pranayam, chanting and meditation. They are seeking the true meaning of life through these methods.

The new generation has found new gurus-Asaa Ram Baapu, Guru Maa, Swami Ram Dev, Sudarshan Ji Maharaaj etc. These holy men guide their behaviour and teach them the basic principles of life. Ruhani Singh, student of GCG-11 reveals: “Yoga has become a part and parcel of my lifestyle.”

They still believe in partying, but at the same time they are strongly immersed in spiritual matters. A large number of schoolchildren and college students practice these methods. According to them, it gives them mental peace and acts as a cure for many mental and physical disorders. They become extremely disciplined and positive about life. From staying away from greed, anger and jealousy to taking responsibility for one’s action, caring for other people’s happiness, to being happy even when the going gets tough, youths report victories in work, relationship and health.

Many parents feel that by attending spiritual discourses their children will become more focussed and concentrate better. They will help them cope up with stress and problems. It has been observed that various schools are also moulding their students towards spiritual matters. Ms Venus Pawa, a call centre executive, feels yoga acts as a stress buster from her strenuous routine.

The young ones today are devoting more time in visiting religious places or reading religious books. Their ultimate aim is to achieve salvation (moksha) and attain as much spiritual knowledge as they can so that they can come out of their everyday hassles.

— Shikha Davessar

NEW RELEASES
A filmmaker’s confession

Esha Deol and Aftab Shivdasani in Ankahee
Esha Deol and Aftab Shivdasani in Ankahee

Pritish Nandy Communications presents Ankahee starring Aftab Shivdasani, Esha Deol and Ameesha Patel. This one is a bold movie directed by Vikram Bhatt who chooses to tell a story that is very much close to his heart. It is a untold account of extra-marital relationship.

The buzz is that the film’s idea has been derived from Vikram Bhatt’s own relationship in the past with former Miss Universe Sushmita Sen. The trade pundits says, “It is a Vikram Bhatt’s honest movie”. There is no sex, no violence and only three songs penned by Sameer, Amitabh Verma and Subrat Sinha. Pritam tunes are melodious in nature.

Esha Deol teams up with Aftab Shivdasani after Koi Mere Dil Se Pooche. Esha is very excited to play the role of a beauty queen in Ankahee. The film boasts of good production values and a rich look. It would be interesting to see how does this film fare at box office. One almost starts believing that Vikram Bhatt truly has a sensitive story, which has stirred up a lot of curiosity. The movie opens today at Fun Republic, Manimajra.

Entertainment ensured

Shankar, the maker of Humse Hai Muqabla, Hindustani and Nayak is ready to take centre stage with his big-budget film Aparichit—The Stranger. It will be released today at Nirman, Chandigarh, and Fun Republic, Manimajra.

Oscar Films Pvt Ltd’s Aparichit, the Hindi version of the Tamil super-duper hit Anniyan promises entertainment.

Vikram and Sada play the lead roles. Ravi Chandran presents Aparichit, which has five songs composed by Harris Jayaraj. A song featuring Yana Gupta was shot at a cost of Rs 1.5 crore.

— D.P.

Strategy for a kitchen

Throughout the years kitchens have evolved based on the needs, demands and lifestyles of the family and in today’s family on the move, the kitchen must be able to multi-task as well. No longer is the kitchen simply a room in the home where food is prepared. By taking advantage of the numerous options and amenities available today in kitchen furniture and appliances you can give your kitchen vibrancy and life. Let’s plan to maximise the utility of our kitchen this week.

Creating harmony between the storage above and below the worktop and display is paramount. Common fallacy is that one can only have storage cupboards below. Think of beautiful wine racks and round edged open display shelves at the ends to cushion injuries to heads, shoulders and hips.

Nevertheless, there’s more room for creativity above the worktop. Multi-hued pickled vegetables, pulse pots and dry pasta shells, blue pottery plates or vases, seasoned olive oil and vinegar bottles, crystal decanters and ornamental beer mugs, decorative exotic spices and pickle jars are few of the options that may be displayed in open shelves. Endless grocery jars, tins, bottles, boxes and packets, however, will be better placed behind shutters.

Since storage in kitchen takes precedence, install magic corners or carousels to maximum use of corners. Items stored above must not be heavy though. Every day cooking pots and pans, china and cutlery must be easily accessible whilst special occasional usage stuff can be stored beyond. Storing transparent jars of pulses and spices at eye level is more practical for access and especially when you are making grocery list. Restrict drawers to below the counter as clean lines of opaque or glass shutters look very attractive at the top.

Plate and glass racks are useful for easy storage and display of plates and also saves fragile ones from chipping. Hang mugs from smaller pegs whilst jugs and pans can be hung from a square/circular copper rack suspended from the ceiling in the middle of the kitchen; a la country style. You may use this rack for drying bunches of fresh herbs, garlic etc. A breakfast bar underneath would look beautiful. However, be aware that this rack will be exposed to everyday cooking fumes, steam, grease and dust.

Create illusion of space in small and narrow kitchens by making wall units taller rather than deeper. This will also create more headspace and kitchen will look wider. Create segments within drawers to store smaller items. Hide water filter behind faux shutters or masala rack which needs less depth. Can you hide hot water geyser behind shutters too? Do place your kitchen bin strategically. It should be hidden from site but not forgotten to rot. Never plan cabinets over ventilation/exhaust points.

Side swing doors on ovens and microwaves are easier for (un)loading food. Sliding doors take less space but are not trouble-free. Base cabinets can be equipped with full-extension drawers or rollout shelves to be more accessible. Select hardware that can be operated with a gentle push. Lever handles are best for faucets and doors. Loop handles are best for drawers. Countertops with rounded edges can reduce injury if someone should happen to fall or bump into them. Keep your worktop clutter free for a tidy look. Don’t forget to give your cookery books a place in your kitchen.

Another way of breaking the monotony of cupboard/worktop/cupboard rhythm of your kitchen is by placing a china cabinet strategically. Buffet cabinet is another excellent idea for display and storage utility. One could further deviate from top or bottom storage by having a couple of top to bottom tall units. A tall cupboard with contrasting shutters also offers more storage space, which can be used as pantry or grocery shopping.

Courtsey: A.P. Singh Besten & Co.

Health tip of the day

Excessive neck extension while sleeping can be corrected by using a small, soft pillow that supports the normal cervical curve. A non-springy material like feather pillow should replace a foam rubber pillow.

— Dr. Ravinder Chadha

TAROT TALK
What the cards say today...
P. KHURRANA

ARIES : “The Star” the card responsible for the brilliant ideas you come up with, is still on your side so any decision taken will be right. Personal life will now move faster. Stable marital life is on the cards. You share great moments with a soul mate. Lucky colour: Pink. TIP OF THE WEEK: Focus new light on your emotional and spiritual place. 
LIBRA : The card “The Devil” reveals that you will be running late on everything you do, as a result you don’t have any time to spare. Some career choices have to be made before an important opportunity passes you by. You could be in for a dose of your own medicine. Lucky colour: Rusty red. TIP OF THE WEEK: Win the war with honesty, not by distorting facts. 
TAURUS : You display strength and courage in the face of trouble and come through crisis successfully. An Aquarius person has a positive influence in your love life. A trip overseas can be planned. Niggling doubts in your mind can be removed and minor ailments can be healed with yoga and meditation. Lucky colour: Electric blue. TIP OF THE WEEK: Think positive and be optimistic. 
SCORPIO:  “Ace of Pentacles” reveals the seed of prosperity and material gain - perhaps as yet unseen. You are thinking seriously about important relationship during this period. You are blessed with spiritual insight and clarity of vision as you move into the new current for the future. Lucky colour: Silver grey. TIP OF THE WEEK: You will need to learn how to cope better with success; its demand and its limitations. 
GEMINI : You may feel sacrificed to routine and patterns like “The Hanged Man”. A Taurean friend is moody but supportive. Children and family demand quality time and attention. Beware of becoming too practical or domesticated. You express feelings and share creative ideas. Lucky colour: Rusty red. TIP OF THE WEEK: Win the war with honesty, not by distorting facts. 
SAGITTARIUS : The “Prince of Wands” rides in his flaming chariot of gold to instigate dynamic changes. Profits are expected from a new deal if it comes through on Monday. Romance may blossom at work place. Keep home and work strictly separate. Journalists, teachers, advocates, models and cine stars are in the limelight. Thursday could be a financially irksome. Lucky Colour: Cream. TIP OF THE WEEK: Take time before reacting. Avoid situation that may turn nasty. 
CANCER : In love? Venus planet of Love gives you an excellent opportunity to find your soul mate. You can expect promotion or extra perks this week. A Sagittarius person gives you good counsel. Love and laughter will cheer you up on Wednesday. Lucky colour: Silver grey. TIP OF THE WEEK: You will need to learn how to cope better with success; its demand and its limitations. 
CAPRICORN : Let other people fight to be in the rat race, advises the “Two of Rods” card. You just need to be in the moment and enjoy the fruits of your labour. For some of you a change of residence is highlighted. Your health improves as you focus on fitness routines and healthy diets to heal the body. Lucky colour: Blue. TIP OF THE WEEK: You are your own best friend so do not delegate your tasks to anyone. 
LEO : The card “Hermit” invites you to take an astute and honest look at your close relationships. Hurried actions and judgment can lead to chaos and confusion; be patient and preserving. You need to prove that you have been misjudged. A Cancerian person is supportive. The comic drift will turn the downs into ups. Lucky colour: Pink. TIP OF THE WEEK: Boost your confidence with positive thinking. 
AQUARIUS : “The Temperance” inspires you to climb new heights and execute creative ideas. A small sum spent now will allow you to make big profits later. Your desire to help others is admirable, but it could lead you into the trouble. Surprises and unexpected changes are on the cards on Thursday. Lucky colour: Orange. TIP OF THE WEEK: Results are guaranteed if you stick to arrangements. 
VIRGO : “The Six of wands” highlights relationships and finances. Don’t let a misunderstanding cause the rot to set into a close relationship. You have been so busy recently that you may have forgotten to pay attention to those close to you. Job satisfaction can be increased if you decide to be more independent. Lucky colour: Electric blue. TIP OF THE WEEK: Think positive and be optimistic. 
PISCES: Your card “Ace of Swords” shows overall a prosperous week. You will be especially attracted to things of beauty and may have a yen to travel distant places. You could be revisiting a previous relationship and enjoying the connection. Follow the trends, resisting will only lead to frustration. In love? Make the first move on Thursday. Lucky colour: White. TIP OF THE WEEK: Don’t give up your rights.




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