SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS

Every Wednesday and Friday

Tanning adds colour to pollution
The pollution hazard stares us all in the face today. No section of society is untouched by it. The tanning industry in the city is contributing to it in various ways. Last week the Punjab Pollution Control Board stopped 10 such units from operating. Deepkamal Kaur finds out the extent of pollution and the contributing factors

The horror of unbearable foul stench, open channels of effluent discharge, heaps of discarded animal skin and bundles of wet, blue-coloured chrome-tanned hides greet you as you enter the Surgical and Leather Complex, almost 15 km from Jalandhar, on the Kapurthala road.
Untreated effluents run through open channels near tanning units operating from the Surgical and Leather Complex, almost 15 km from Jalandhar. The polluting sludge is finally discharged into the Kala Sanghian Drain Untreated effluents run through open channels near tanning units operating from the Surgical and Leather Complex, almost 15 km from Jalandhar. The polluting sludge is finally discharged into the Kala Sanghian Drain. — Tribune photo by Pawan Sharma







EARLIER EDITIONS



Ensure potable water to all, DC tells MC 
Jalandhar Deputy Commissioner Anurag Verma on Monday directed officers of the Municipal Corporation and Municipal Committees to ensure clean and potable water to the residents.

Representatives of the Shiromani Akali Dal ride horse carts in Jalandhar to register their protest against the increase in prices of petrol and diesel. Petroleum products are expensive in Punjab compared to neighbouring states due to high sales tax levied by the Amarinder Singh government
TIME ROLLS BACK: Representatives of the Shiromani Akali Dal (Badal) ride horse carts in Jalandhar to register their protest against the increase in prices of petrol and diesel. Petroleum products are expensive in Punjab compared to neighbouring states due to high sales tax levied by the Amarinder Singh government. Punjab has 27.5 per cent sales tax on petrol, whereas the same tax in Chandigarh is 22 per cent and is even lower in Haryana. The national average of the tax is 20 per cent. — Tribune photo by Pawan Sharma

It’s all about loving your grandparents 
The relationship between children and their grandparents consists of a strong bond of unconditional love. This love manifests when a child affectionately holds his or her grandparents’ hand, or listens to the stories in rapt attention while sitting in their lap. And it is not surprising, children many a times dote more on their grandparents than their parents. And why not, when grandparents dote out all the time in the world for their grandchildren and pamper them. For these children, grandparents are integral part of their families and essential to their scheme of things.

Forum’s notice to PUDA
The District Consumer Disputes Redressal Forum has issued a showcause notice to an official of the Punjab Urban Development Authority (PUDA) under Section 27 of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986, for appearing in person on July 11 and explaining why compliance of its orders pertaining to the refund of excess amount of extension fee had not been paid to a consumer.The forum had, on December 2, 2005, passed orders in favour of the complaint, Mr Sarwan Singh, a resident of Chandigarh, asking the PUDA officials to refund the excess amount charged by them on July 21, 1999, till payment.

Positive Kapil presents straight bat
Attitude, it is said, is generally the difference between winning and losing. Many a great talent has failed to translate into a winner, thanks to the mysterious workings of the mind. Kapil Dev started his career with a bang and went on to triumphantly cross many a hurdles, and set a new benchmark for others to follow. A positive attitude marks a winner. Talking to Kapil, that’s the first thing one realises. When the first cricketing question is put, ‘Punjab da Puttar’ wants to talk of positive things happening in Indian cricket.
Legendary all-rounder Kapil Dev stresses a point during his chat with mediapersons at Jalandhar. He was in the city to inaugurate a dealership of Rhino, a sports utility vehicle introduced by the International Cars and Motors Limited, a new venture of Sonalika Group. — A Tribune photograph

Legendary all-rounder Kapil Dev stresses a point during his chat with mediapersons at Jalandhar. He was in the city to inaugurate a dealership of Rhino, a sports utility vehicle introduced by the International Cars and Motors Limited

IMA’s clean chit to local hospital
The controversy surrounding the recent death of nine-year-old Sakshi, allegedly due to negligence of doctors of a private hospital here, took a new turn with the Jalandhar unit of the Indian Medical Association (IMA) coming to rescue of the local Oxford Hospital, and virtually giving a clean chit to it.

Young World
Camp upon camp this summer

A summer camp began in the kindergarten section of CT Public School on Thursday for training children in swimming, dancing, dramatics and crafts. There is another camp for horse riding and workouts at gymnasium. An adventure club has also begun in the school, Mr Manbir Singh, MD of the CT Educational Society, and Ms Lakhwinder Kaur, Principal, said.
Boys join girls to take cooking lessons at a private instiute in Jalandhar Children learn the basics of soft-toy making at Euro Kids Playway School in Jalandhar
changing times: Boys join girls to take cooking lessons at a private instiute in Jalandhar. — A Tribune photo Little Angels: Children learn the basics of soft-toy making at Euro Kids Playway School in Jalandhar. — A Tribune photo

Sainik School cadets in NDA’s passing out parade
It was a motivating trip for the 25 cadets of the Sainik School, Kapurthala, to the National Defence Academy (NDA), Pune. They were received by an alumnus of their own school, Colonel Rajiv Thakur, Commanding Officer, 11 Maratha. The Colonel also took care of the arrangements for the stay of the cadets. The cadets who left Kapurthala on May 28 had surprises in store for them when they met Jaspreet, one of their seniors leading the a squadron at the passing out parade of the NDA on May 31.

Kewal Kiran Clothing Lt, with a nationwide retail chain, opened its 39th outlet, K-Lounge, in Model Town, Jalandhar, on Tuesday. The new store will sell jeans, shirts, trousers, T-shirts and jackets from four of the company’s flagship brands — “Killer”, “Easios”, “Lawman” and “Integriti” Bus operators protest outside the office of the Regional Transport Authority seeking a change in the time table in Jalandhar on Monday. Alleging that the new time table had certain flaws
Kewal Kiran Clothing Lt, with a nationwide retail chain, opened its 39th outlet, K-Lounge, in Model Town, Jalandhar, on Tuesday. The new store will sell jeans, shirts, trousers, T-shirts and jackets from four of the company’s flagship brands — “Killer”, “Easios”, “Lawman” and “Integriti”. The company planned to open 100 more K-Lounge stores in the next 18 months, the director, Mr Hemant Jain said. — A Tribune photograph anger in their eyes: Bus operators protest outside the office of the Regional Transport Authority seeking a change in the time table in Jalandhar on Monday. Alleging that the new time table had certain flaws, they accused Punjab Roadways bus drivers of passing on the 21 schedules, that they had been given, on to private operators at a premium. — Photo by S. S. Chopra


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Tanning adds colour to pollution
The pollution hazard stares us all in the face today. No section of society is untouched by it. The tanning industry in the city is contributing to it in various ways. Last week the Punjab Pollution Control Board stopped 10 such units from operating. Deepkamal Kaur finds out the extent of pollution and the contributing factors

Waste from tanneries is dumped outside the units in the Surgical and Leather Complex
Waste from tanneries is dumped outside the units in the Surgical and Leather Complex. 

Pieces of unfinished leather are being dried outside the units
Pieces of unfinished leather are being dried outside the units.  — Photos by S.S. Chopra

The horror of unbearable foul stench, open channels of effluent discharge, heaps of discarded animal skin and bundles of wet, blue-coloured chrome-tanned hides greet you as you enter the Surgical and Leather Complex, almost 15 km from Jalandhar, on the Kapurthala road.

In fact, the stench is a great indicator of the approaching pollution, as it thrusts at you more than a kilometre before the complex.

At the tanneries, you witness clear violations of the pollution norms, posing a serious risk to lives of hundreds of workers employed inside these units.

Dug-up drains are full of hazardous, chemical effluent, which runs around everywhere on either side of the passage. Most of the channels overflow due with sludge causing blockages. The dirty discharge overflows towards the roads, making the surroundings even filthier.

Majority of the tanners here are processing through mineral tanning, using chromium, instead of vegetable tanning. Chromium is posing a serious health risk to all those working in the complex. The carcinogenic chemical has the tendency to settle in the environment and cause lung diseases, including cancer, besides skin ailments. During the process, it gets washed off and mixes with water that percolates deep into the soil and enters the underground water.

Last Thursday, the Punjab Pollution Control Board had ordered closure of 10 tanneries in Jalandhar, including one in the complex. The officials had taken the action as the units had been running illegally without the mandatory permission from the board.

None of the 10 tanners had installed any treatment plants and were discharging the effluents directly into the Kala Sanghian Drain, the board had observed.

Insiders reveal that volume of discharge is so much that a Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) set up inside the tanneries is inadequate to the needs as can treat barely one-third of the total volume of highly toxic waste discharged each day.

The CETP that was repaired and restarted in September last year after a gap of almost five years has a capacity of treating just 1.5 million litres of discharge per day (MLD) while more than 5 MLD water laced with excessive amounts of chromium flows out of the factories.

Majority of the 50 tanneries discharge untreated effluents via open channels into the Kala Sanghian Drain, which passes close to the complex, resulting in water pollution, land and air pollution. These open channels confluence in the backyard of the treatment plant and then discharge the untreated, smelly, dark waste waters into the Kala Sanghian Drain.

The drain further joins the Chitti Bein, which eventually merges with Sutlej. The blatant pollution of this inter-connected water system poses a serious risk, not just to the aquatic flora and fauna but also human lives as this water also goes into the Sirhind feeder canal that supplies drinking water to Mansa, Bathinda and Faridkot districts.

For five years, the entire untreated discharge directly went into the Kala Sanghian Drain. The Punjab and Haryana High Court directed the Punjab Small Industries and Export Corporation (PSIEC), which had been set up the complex, to get the only CETP functional by August 1, 2005. It finally became functional in September last year.

Members of the Punjab Leather Federation filed an appeal in the high court against the PSIEC after the tanners were asked to shut their units by the Punjab Pollution Control Board (PPCB).

The members had contended that the PSIEC had assured them at the time of agreement 11 years ago that they would provide the tanners with two CETPs of requisite capacities for disposal of effluents.

The existing plant has a capacity of treating 1.5 MLD waste and the tanners have been demanding that another module of the plant be installed as the volume of total waste produced by the wet units was nearly 5 MLD.

This is not the only hazard. The pollution saga continues in other ways. Outside nearly every unit are huge piles of discarded animal skin, partly wet. But this is not waste material. It is being used further in glucose factories. Labourers, who were loading a truck with scraps of animals, revealed they were transporting the material to a nearby factory. “This is not waste product. These are rejected pieces of animal skin from the mouth area and limbs being sold for Rs 3 per kg which can act as an excellent raw material for production of starch and glucose”, they explained.

The workers engaged in drying chromium-tanned hides don’t use any gloves as a safeguard, their skins coming in direct contact with the hazardous carcinogenic chemical.

Mr S.K. Misra, scientist in-charge, extension centre of the Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Leather Complex, said the institute was trying to provide every help to the leather industry for treatment of effluents in eco-friendly disposal techniques, training and extension facilities. He said it had provided the tanners designs for setting up treatment plants. The institute had also devised ways for chromium recovery from the discharge for which it was advising the unit owners to set up individual chrome recovery plants. He said that they had also been given an option to have a common recovery plant for all units, as in Kolkata, or a mobile unit that could go from unit to unit to provide the service.

Mr H.S. Matharoo, XEN, PSIEC, said, “We had finalised the contract through tenders for setting up the second module of the CETP. But the members of the Punjab Leather Federation took the matter to the Punjab and Haryana High Court for which the date of hearing has been fixed for July 18”.

Mr Hardeep Singh, Environment Engineer, PPCB, was not available for comments. 

Where do the hides come from?

Most tanners use hides of cows, buffaloes and sheep to manufacture leather, which is used in bags, shoes, jackets and other stuff.

These hides primarily come from dairies in villages falling in the Nakodar sub-division. After the animals die, fall weak or start producing less milk, these are slaughtered and sent here.

The tanners revealed that Butan Mandi was another major market for hides. Some tanners also get hides from Rajasthan, Srinagar and Amritsar.

Chromium, a carcinogen

Chromium is an essential nutrient that helps the body use sugar, protein and fat but an excessive exposure by breathing contaminated air, skin contact, eating contaminated food and drinking contaminated water can lead to several ailments.

This grey colour, solid metal can lead to shortness of breath, coughing and wheezing, ulceration of the septum, bronchitis, decreased pulmonary function, pneumonia, convulsions, kidney and liver damage, gastrointestinal and neurological problems. 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has determined that chromium (VI), used in tanning, as a human carcinogen. Dermal exposure occurring in leather tanned with chromic sulphate can cause skin burns.

People who live in the vicinity of chromium waste disposal sites or chromium manufacturing are prone to such ailments. Laboratory tests can detect chromium in the blood, urine and hair of exposed individuals.

In air, chromium compounds are present mostly as fine dust particles which eventually settle over land and water. Chromium can strongly attach to soil and only a small amount can dissolve in water and move deeper in the soil to underground water and even enter food chain.

Living near uncontrolled hazardous waste sites and growing vegetables in the contaminated soil is not advisable.

What is tanning?

Tanning is the process of making leather from skin. Preparing hides begins by curing them with salt. In wet-salting, the hides are heavily salted for about 16 hours. The hides are soaked in water to remove the salt and a lime solution to loosen the hair. Most of the hair is removed by machine while the remaining ones are taken out by hand using a dull knife in a process known as “scudding”.

Tanning can be performed with either vegetable or mineral methods. Vegetable tanning uses “tannin”, from which tanning gets it name. Tannin occurs naturally in bark. But most tanners here are doing mineral tanning by using chromium as it is faster (less than a day for this part of the process) than vegetable tanning and produces a stretchable leather excellent for handbags and garments.

In the raw state, chrome-tanned skins are blue and therefore referred to as “wet blue”. 

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Ensure potable water to all, DC tells MC 
Tribune News Service

Jalandhar Deputy Commissioner Anurag Verma on Monday directed officers of the Municipal Corporation and Municipal Committees to ensure clean and potable water to the residents.

Mr Verma asked the civic authority to ensure that proper chlorination of water supplied was done and all necessary steps taken to stop the contamination of water from all sources including sewerage, illegal connections or old pipes.

The Deputy Commissioner (DC) asked the Municipal Corporation and Municipal Committees to fix responsibility of officers for particular areas, so that in case of any lapse, deterrent action could be taken against the officer concerned.

He also asked the Civil Surgeon to take water samples on a large scale so that contamination of water could be detected in advance.

He directed the Civil Surgeon to take at least 10 water samples daily from the area of Municipal Corporation, Jalandhar.

Similarly, in each Municipal Committee, at least three water samples per week per tubewell should be taken, he ordered.

He added that water samples should be taken in each village where drinking water was being supplied by Rural Water Supply Department while focussing on poor localities, slums and those areas which have been affected by gastroenteritis.

Mr Verma directed the SDMs to ensure that 20 per cent of these water samples were taken in their presence or in the presence of some Executive Magistrate.

He asked the Municipal Corporation and Executive Officers of all Municipal Committees to identify the slum areas and other areas, which have been affected by gastroenteritis in the past.

He also directed the Executive Engineer, Rural Water Supply Department, to obtain certificates from respective SDOs that potable drinking water supply was available in all villages.

The DC also directed the District Education Officer (elementary and secondary) to get the water tanks cleaned in the government and aided schools and ensure that drinking water available for school children was potable.

He asked them to issue similar directions to all others schools as well. 

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It’s all about loving your grandparents 
Anil Jerath
Tribune News Service

The relationship between children and their grandparents consists of a strong bond of unconditional love. This love manifests when a child affectionately holds his or her grandparents’ hand, or listens to the stories in rapt attention while sitting in their lap. And it is not surprising, children many a times dote more on their grandparents than their parents. And why not, when grandparents dote out all the time in the world for their grandchildren and pamper them. For these children, grandparents are integral part of their families and essential to their scheme of things.

“My daddy (grandpa) is so good that he buys me whatever I ask for, unlike my parents. Otherwise he explains why I should not have it,” five-year-old Simran of Kamla Nehru School in Phagwara says. Simran prefers to watch cartoons when she is home. “When I’m home, I fight with daddy to watch cartoons and it’s me who always wins.”

The bedtime stories have been an age-old medium to pass on values to the young ones in the family. Particularly grandparents have happily been doing this task for centuries.

Jyotsna, a six-year-old, does not sleep without listening to bedtime stories from her grandmother. She says, “My ‘badi ma’ tells me stories of fairies, animals, kings and queens, which are my all-time favourite. At times, I make her narrate them again and again. But she does not tell stories during the day because by doing so, she says ‘mama rasta bhul jayega.”

And Jyotsna does not forget to add that it is her “badi ma” who shields her from her mother’s temper whenever she does something wrong or does not drink milk.

There is no denying the fact that grandparents contribute in a major way in creating a healthy atmosphere at home. Not only this, they also play the role of mediator between the little warring factions.

Five-year-old Harshit jumps from the bed when he finds that his mother is not at home and has fun with his “dadu”.

He says, “My mother does not let me eat wafers or chocolates. And when she is not at home, I ask ‘dadu’ to buy them for me.”

He narrates how “dadu” resolves scuffles between him and his friends.

In modern homes, where both the parents are working, the presence of grandparents is a bonus, as children get proper care and nourishment. Moreover, it also lends security to a child’s psychology.

Priti from St Joseph Convent School confides all her secrets to her “nanu”.

“When I come back from school, I tell each and everything to him. He also shares his day’s gossips with me. And I ask him not to tell my secrets to anyone,” she says.

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Forum’s notice to PUDA
Deepkamal Kaur
Tribune News Service

The District Consumer Disputes Redressal Forum has issued a showcause notice to an official of the Punjab Urban Development Authority (PUDA) under Section 27 of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986, for appearing in person on July 11 and explaining why compliance of its orders pertaining to the refund of excess amount of extension fee had not been paid to a consumer.The forum had, on December 2, 2005, passed orders in favour of the complaint, Mr Sarwan Singh, a resident of Chandigarh, asking the PUDA officials to refund the excess amount charged by them on July 21, 1999, till payment.

The complainant, through his counsel, Mr K.C. Malhotra, had asked for a refund of Rs 1,23,873 because it had been compelled to pay extension for total amount of Rs 1,30,783 when only an amount of Rs 6,910 was recoverable.

The PUDA had been directed to reassess the cancellation fee on the basis old rates as on March 25, 2002, citing the Punjab and Haryana High Court case of one Tehal Singh and one Sant Kaur and not enhanced fee under rules enforced prior to it.

In the meantime, PUDA had also approached the State Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission, Punjab, through its Additional Chief Administrator against the order of the district forum, but its application was disposed off by the Commission President, Justice R.S. Mongia, on April 28, 2006.

The forum has now observed that since the concerned PUDA official have failed to obey its directions, he is liable to be proceeded for execution under section 27 of Consumer Protection Act.

In another case, the forum has issued a notice to cable operators for disconnecting transmission of cable connections of four residents of the Vasant Vihar against its order passed on June 5. The forum had issued a notice to the Jalandhar Siti Cable and Win Cable restraining them from disconnecting the television cable transmission connection and charging enhanced monthly subscription rate of Rs 300 from members of the Vasant Vihar Housing Building Cooperative Society till further orders.

As per a fresh complaint filed in this regard, the residents whose cable connections had been cut included Mr H.S. Minhas, Ashok Kumar Chodha, Bhupinder Singh and Professor Rajiv Anand. The complainant, who is the secretary of the Vasant Vihar Housing Building Cooperative Society, has said that the cable operators are even reluctant to restore the connections disconnected illegally. The residents have even submitted copies of the receipts of enhanced cable charges taken from the members to the tune of Rs 300, days after the stay orders in this regard had been passed. 

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Positive Kapil presents straight bat
Rubinder Gill
Tribune News Service

Attitude, it is said, is generally the difference between winning and losing. Many a great talent has failed to translate into a winner, thanks to the mysterious workings of the mind.

Kapil Dev started his career with a bang and went on to triumphantly cross many a hurdles, and set a new benchmark for others to follow. A positive attitude marks a winner. Talking to Kapil, that’s the first thing one realises. When the first cricketing question is put, ‘Punjab da Puttar’ wants to talk of positive things happening in Indian cricket.

With all the focus on the World Cup next year in the West Indies, questions inevitably turn to India’s chances of lifting the coveted trophy again. Kapil, the only Indian captain to take the team to the title, cleanly hooks the bouncer for a six. “India have all the ammunition to win the World Cup next year. The only worry is injuries to players. Lately we have seen a lot of them.” The great athletic all-rounder had an almost injury-free career, an anomaly for a fast bowler today.

In the city on Monday, he was at pains to emphasise the task of staying positive.

As talk turned to the current Caribbean tour, his eyes lit up as he said, “I’m very happy that Virender Sehwag, Rahul Dravid and Mohammad Kaif are among runs.” For him that is a positive thing in the second Test underway at the picturesque St Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago.

The 1-4 Indian defeat in the recently concluded one-day series is a “wake-up call for the players” as well as the management if India are to realise their dream of lifting the World Cup again, the former Indian skipper said.

With the tournament in the West Indies next year, Kapil said the team would definitely benefit from the experience and should learn from the mistakes which were instrumental in the unexpected loss to the West Indies, who were the underdogs at the beginning of the series.

The new India suddenly finds itself with a glut of young and new fast bowlers.

The choice is suddenly immense. These young speedsters, charging into the team and making themselves count, gladden Kapil’s heart.

“It makes me extremely happy to see all these young fast bowlers. There was a time when Bishen Singh Bedi would bowl the second over of the innings. May be, soon India would count on fast bowlers to win them matches,” says the medium pacer who was the mainstay of the bowling attack and carried the load single-handedly for most of his career.

As for the inexperience of the medium pacers on the current tour, Kapil again chose to see only the positive in the whole scenario. “With Anil Kumble in the side the, the inexperience factor is negated to quite an extent. He has more than enough experience of the Caribbean pitches. The young ones will learn quite well with this tour. That is how all of us learnt.”

Kapil deftly steered clear of all even remotely controversial issues.

He presented a straight bat on a treacherous pitch, refusing to comment on cricket administrators and Sourav Ganguly.

The Ganguly googly was tackled with élan. “Ganguly has served the country for long. He has scored more than 10,000 runs in one-day cricket. We should appreciate his contribution.”

Regarding the issue of a bowling coach for the team, a non-committal Kapil said it was subject to requirement.

“Only, if the team needs it. We should not have one because others have employed one.” 

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IMA’s clean chit to local hospital
Tribune News Service

The controversy surrounding the recent death of nine-year-old Sakshi, allegedly due to negligence of doctors of a private hospital here, took a new turn with the Jalandhar unit of the Indian Medical Association (IMA) coming to rescue of the local Oxford Hospital, and virtually giving a clean chit to it.

Addressing a press conference here, Dr Bharat Bhushan, president of the Jalandhar unit of the IMA, and Dr Naveen Chitkara, senior neurosurgeon at the Oxford Hospital, said Sakshi was discharged from the hospital on February 22, 2006, after undergoing a surgery.

Two weeks later she had a collection of blood at the operated site.

The blood was drained out on April 7.

“She was suspected to have some inherited bleeding disorder and was referred to the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Research, Chandigarh, on April 13 and her referral was basically aimed at making a final diagnosis for the recurrent bleeding,” said Dr Chitkara.

Dr Bharat Bhushan refuted the allegations of the relatives of the deceased that in all a sum of Rs 5.5 lakh were charged by the hospital.

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Young World
Camp upon camp this summer
Tribune News Service

A summer camp began in the kindergarten section of CT Public School on Thursday for training children in swimming, dancing, dramatics and crafts. There is another camp for horse riding and workouts at gymnasium. An adventure club has also begun in the school, Mr Manbir Singh, MD of the CT Educational Society, and Ms Lakhwinder Kaur, Principal, said.

A week long summer camp was also organised at the MGN Public School, Urban Estate-II, for pre-primary and primary-wing students. The pre-primary wing students are being trained in yoga, art, craft, swimming and dance. Personality development sessions are also being held for primary students. Mr J.S. Pasricha, honorary secretary, distributed free T-shirts to all participants of the summer camp. Ms J. Gill, principal, said the camp was held in an environment full of relaxation, fun and frolic. A 10-day summer camp organised for the students of Classes III to VIII concluded at Police DAV Public School on June 10. A spectrum of activities were organised for the students daily in four parts. In the first one, there was swimming, badminton and skating. In the second, there was yoga and aerobics. Third one had clubs for grooming, dramatics, public speaking, communication in English, cyber surfing and quizzing. The last one provided the skill in soft toy making, fabric painting, bhangra, dance and music, paper mache, candle making, paper folding, pot painting and vegetable printing. On the concluding day, the students exhibited items made by them during the camp. They also presented their skill in dance, music, aerobics, dramatics, yoga and public speaking. The guests, Mr M.L. Aeri, Principal of DAV College, Ms Shashi Prabha Dwivedi, IPS, Commandant, 75 Batallion, were taken around the school by Dr Rashmi Vij, Principal.

Cookery camps: National Finishing and Cookery Institute (NFCI) is organising four summer camps for school and college students. College girls, women and even men are attending cookery classes and learning to cook tandoor, bakery, Indian curry, Mexican, Thai, Chinese and Continental dishes. Classes are also being held for mocktails, puddings, soufflés, mousse, cakes, snacks, Indian vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes. For children aged five to nine, there are activities such as gift wrapping, sandwich making, photo frame making. School children of higher age groups are learning fabric painting, acrylic sheet, paper mache, candle making, deco-patch and ceramic painting.

Topper again: Rohini Seth, a B. Sc. (non-medical)-III student of the Hans Raj Mahila Mahavidyalya, has topped the examination conducted by Guru Nanak Dev University getting 2004 marks out of 2400.

She had topped the university for three consecutive years.

Daughter of a businessman, she aims to do MBA now and got 77 percentile in MAT. She is awaiting calls from colleges in Delhi and around.

School result: Students of NC Model Senior Secondary School in Jalandhar Cantonment have achieved first positions among all schools in the cantonment in the Punjab School Education Board (PSEB) exam this year. Retired Major L.S. Khaira, Administrative Officer, said Nandini stood first in the Class X examination, Shelly Bhatia was first in Plus Two (arts) and Puneet got the highest marks in Plus Two (commerce).

B. Sc. results: Jyoti Parkash, a student of the Lyallpur Khalsa College, has stood first in B. Sc. (computer science)-III examination conducted by the Guru Nanak Dev University this year. He has scored 1919 marks out of 2400. Jaswinder Kaur of the college stood second in the university with 1891 marks. In B. Sc.-III (medical), Shubhwant Kaur of the college stood second in the university with 1843 marks out of 2400.

BBA topper: Deepak Dhall, a BBA-III student of the Apeejay College of Fine Arts, stood third in the examination conducted by Guru Nanak Dev University. He is also the district topper. He got 1514 marks out of 2100. Dr Sucharita, Principal, congratulated him. 

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Sainik School cadets in NDA’s passing out parade
Arun Sharma
Tribune News Service

It was a motivating trip for the 25 cadets of the Sainik School, Kapurthala, to the National Defence Academy (NDA), Pune. They were received by an alumnus of their own school, Colonel Rajiv Thakur, Commanding Officer, 11 Maratha. The Colonel also took care of the arrangements for the stay of the cadets. The cadets who left Kapurthala on May 28 had surprises in store for them when they met Jaspreet, one of their seniors leading the a squadron at the passing out parade of the NDA on May 31.

Later on, while visiting the Naval Dockyard, Mumbai, the cadets had a tête-à-tête with its Commanding Officer Commander Ajay Behl, also a former Saikapian.

“I wanted to join the IIT, but after visiting the NDA and having firsthand experience of the life of army officers, I’ve decided to join the Forces,” Sanjay, a Class X student, brimming with emotions, said.

“It was motivating, as we all were able to interact and stay with budding officers of the Indian Army, Prateek, from the same class, said.

Similar were the views of Kumar Gaurav, Vikas and Prem Kant Suman.At NDA, a day before the passing out parade, the cadets witnessed a “Tattoo Show”, which included horse riding, sky diving, yoga, and karate. Admiral Arun Parkash was the chief guest on the occasion.

In Mumbai, the cadets got the opportunity to visit INS Vikrant, which houses the naval museum. The students also made a trip to submarine Shalki.

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