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EDITORIALS

Do what you say
Begin by handing over Dawood, Salahuddin
Pakistan’s involvement in promoting terrorism in India is a well-established fact. What happened in Mumbai on July 11 is the latest example of the use of terrorism for achieving its unholy objectives.

Karnik SEZ no
They have become builders’ tools
Special economic zones were started with great fanfare, in the fond hope that they would help India replicate the Chinese success story of rapid industrialisation. But the optimism never materialised although the government still continues to go gaga over them.

Oil on the boil
Government needs to prepare for it
Once again a steep hike in the global crude prices has jolted financial markets worldwide. From the level of $50 a barrel, that had at one time appeared unreasonable, the oil price recently rose to $78.18 and there is no guarantee that it would not go beyond that.




EARLIER STORIES


ARTICLE

Eliminating the quotas
Price may be high, but benefits may be worth it
by Pran Chopra
A
tragic situation arises when one cherished principle collides with another which is equally cherished. The only choice then left appears to be to abandon the one or the other. Just such a choice now looms ahead, thanks to the ill-considered insistence of the Human Resource Development Minister, Mr Arjun Singh, on quotas for one and all, and on a basis which invites the stigma of communalism.

MIDDLE

Smoking thoughts
by Harish Dhillon
I
had been diagnosed with a mild angina problem and I had become an inveterate chain smoker. On a routine checkup, my doctor was amazed to discover that I had started smoking after the diagnosis. “Did someone advise you that smoking was good for the heart?” I had no answer but at the time I was not able to quit smoking.

OPED

Justice demolished
Delhi law subverts governance
by Jagmohan
F
EW of us realise that the issue of illegal constructions and conversions of properties in Delhi is not merely one of civic governance; it extends to a much larger realm of constitutional morality and the way our democracy is functioning in practice.

The most expensive bottle in the world
by Jerome Taylor
Despite a long and proud history as Mexico’s national drink, tequila nowadays tends to be regarded as the favourite tipple of barely-clad characters heading for a drunken night out.

Chatterati
HQ, Congress Inc.
by Devi Cherian
I
T has taken exactly 18 years for the new Congress office to don the corporate look.  It was in 1988 that money was deposited to obtain land for the party building, by Taj Babbar, the then DPCC President.  The new five-storied swanky office right in the middle of the city cost Rs. 2 crore, but has a modest look.


From the pages of

Editorial cartoon by Rajinder Puri

 
 REFLECTIONS

 

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Do what you say
Begin by handing over Dawood, Salahuddin

Pakistan’s involvement in promoting terrorism in India is a well-established fact. What happened in Mumbai on July 11 is the latest example of the use of terrorism for achieving its unholy objectives. There is no dearth of evidence to prove that the Mumbai train blasts were the handiwork of ISI-controlled outfits like the Lashkar-e-Toiyaba, functioning as the Jamaat-ud-Da’wah. New Delhi does not have to rush to Islamabad to prove the latter’s crime. Pakistan has not only been aiding and abetting terrorism in India but also providing shelter to US-designated global terrorist Dawood Ibrahim, who lives there under the protection of the state machinery. Another such criminal, Syed Salahuddin, a self-confessed jihadi terrorist, who heads the conglomerate of militant outfits called the Jihad Council, has been functioning from across the border. He earlier operated from Jammu and Kashmir.

Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf has no intention of cooperating with India in the fight against terrorism and hence the talk of “providing proof”. If he is really concerned about eliminating this scourge root and branch, as he claims on every available occasion, he should come forward by handing over to India both Dawood and Salahuddin, the most prominent symbols of terrorism in South Asia, as demanded by the External Affairs Ministry spokesman on Friday. Pakistan’s poor record on implementing its promise given in January 2004 for not allowing any territory under its control for use by terrorists provides enough proof that there is no link between what it claims and what it does. It shamelessly denies the existence of terrorist training camps, their communication networks, etc, which continue to function unhindered in Pakistan. Reports carried in the Pakistani media itself nail Islamabad’s lie.

It is surprising that the US administration is allowing the sale of F-16s to an irresponsible regime in Islamabad, ignoring the opinion of US lawmakers. A government that relies on terrorism for achieving its political objectives does not deserve such sophisticated flying machines. There is also the danger of these fighter planes falling into the hands of terrorists. The cause of peace demands that the US must revise its decision soon.

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Karnik SEZ no
They have become builders’ tools

Special economic zones (SEZs) were started with great fanfare, in the fond hope that they would help India replicate the Chinese success story of rapid industrialisation. But the optimism never materialised although the government still continues to go gaga over them. Stray voices of dissent have been raised by various independent observers, which have been largely ignored. However, when a person of the stature of NASSCOM chief Kiran Karnik also says publicly that SEZs serve no purpose in information technology, it is time to sit up and take notice. Nobody would know more about the real situation than Mr Karnik. He has been unsparing in his criticism, adding that all that the SEZs do is to lead to land grab and promotion of builders and promoters. No wonder, they have failed to promote either exports or employment. At best, they are good only for big companies. What is true in the case of IT happens to be true in general as well.

It would be difficult for even the strongest votaries of SEZs to contradict what Mr Karnik says. In fact, there are many other aspects of the problem, on which he has kept silent. The building mafia happens to be hand in glove with politicians and bureaucrats, and all of them make a killing while the real purpose of establishing SEZs is conveniently ignored. Till this problem is sorted out, it will be counter-productive to continue to lay stress on these mega projects.

The land mafia is such a closed group that it does not make even a pretence of being fair. Land is acquired from farmers at throwaway prices and is then sought to be sold at astronomical rates. Even official agencies looking after industrial development join in the loot. The standard excuse is that they have to incur a huge expenditure on developing the area. Hence the mark-up. Point taken, but how is that they make such a big pile while doing this “onerous” job? It will be in the fitness of things to set up SEZs only after dispassionate scrutiny and that too after adequately compensating the rightful owners of the land. The scheme should not be a money-making machine for various parties or persons.

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Oil on the boil
Government needs to prepare for it

Once again a steep hike in the global crude prices has jolted financial markets worldwide. From the level of $50 a barrel, that had at one time appeared unreasonable, the oil price recently rose to $78.18 and there is no guarantee that it would not go beyond that. This time the trigger for the price hike has come from the Israeli-Hezbollah conflict in Lebanon. The oil prices escalated due to fears that the fighting in Iraq and Lebanon could engulf other oil producers. The International Energy Agency has warned that OPEC, a cartel of oil producers, is unable to control the prices.

The Indian stock market, in sync with global markets, too has been buffeted by the turmoil in West Asia and FIIs in particular are on a selling spree. This is despite some excellent corporate results, which indicate that India Inc’s growth story is on a strong foundation. The rising interest rates in the US and elsewhere are also driving foreign investors to pull out of relatively risky stock markets and park their funds in US bonds. As a result of persistent selling, many currencies have weakened against the dollar. The Indian rupee recently touched a three-year low of Rs 46.75 against the dollar.

While the depreciation of the rupee against the dollar will not have any serious repercussions, the flareup in the crude prices is a cause for concern. While another increase in the retail oil prices may not be politically feasible, given the Left’s known opposition to it, the oil companies will take a direct hit. India will have to work out a strategy to cope with the rising oil prices, which may even touch $100 a barrel in the not-too-distant future. The Centre may have to intervene effectively to persuade states to cut taxes on oil before another hike is effected.

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Thought for the day

The philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways; the point is to change it.

— Karl Marx

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Eliminating the quotas
Price may be high, but benefits may be worth it
by Pran Chopra

A tragic situation arises when one cherished principle collides with another which is equally cherished. The only choice then left appears to be to abandon the one or the other. Just such a choice now looms ahead, thanks to the ill-considered insistence of the Human Resource Development Minister, Mr Arjun Singh, on quotas for one and all, and on a basis which invites the stigma of communalism. If this tragedy befalls us it will be all the more tragic for the reason that what he says is his aim can be served better in a secular way. But if that is to happen some clear decisions must be taken soon. Otherwise the opportunity will pass.

The Constitution has rightly prescribed equality for all religions, because that is essential for a country of so many religions. But it has also prescribed affirmative action in favour of two secular sections, the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes. This is because Hindu society, misguided by its own religious beliefs and customs, has discriminated against both of these sections for centuries, and so severely that it has extinguished their ability to compete with others on the basis of equality. That is why the Constitution has sanctioned special aid for them to help them regain their innate ability, and courts have rightly denied it only to those individuals in these two sections who have already risen above the need for it, and their list, as officially announced now, is huge. The way is thus open for serving two values in this way, equality for all and special aid for those who need it most.

Mr Arjun Singh is trying hard to extend these advantages to other sections also. But his methods for deciding who needs them most are tainted by communal yardsticks, because they do not rest upon histories of traditional deprivation like that of the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes; they rest upon labels worn by religious and other such communities in electoral battles. But fortunately for him and his aims, the history and demography of societal injustice in India are such that the communities most affected by it can be secularly defined by space.

A substantial part of the Indian humanity which has been traditionally deprived in social and economic terms lives, by and large, in regions and localities which are not difficult to identify. The reasons for this are easy to see, but they need not detain us here. What is of interest at present is that anything done on the secular plane to uplift these areas also uplifts the affected communities without any need to identify anyone by his faith or beliefs, and without fixing any quotas for the upliftment of one community or another.

Only two further conditions would then need to be added. First, any affirmative action chosen for the benefit of any other disadvantaged group should not dilute any action selected for the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes, and on that there would be no great differences. And second, those who have only marginally fallen short of any prescribed standards, such as marks in an examination, may be given an extra year or two to catch up, may be with a marginal subsidy on the basis of a means test but not on the basis of any caste, class, or communal identity. There would be no great opposition to that either.

Areas will compete for benefits, of course. But competition between demands defined by area, with the most backward being assisted first, is much to be preferred over those defined by communal categories. Response to future demands can also be tied to the levels of performance by these secularly defined areas, and demands can also be phased out as performance approaches fulfilment. The way can thus be cleared for universal targets, area by area. Experience gained in different types of areas will also help public authorities to discover how much they can chew so that they do not bite more than they should in the given circumstances; and also avoid raising expectations to unrealistic levels because unfulfilled expectations are pits which have swallowed many schemes for the welfare of the public.

The moment is particularly relevant today to education, and that makes Mr Arjun Singh more relevant in the evening of his life than ever before in his long and fruitful career. Education has become a constitutionally enforceable fundamental right. It must be provided to whoever demands it. There is no room in this for allotment by quotas. Public attention, therefore, must be focused upon the most feasible way of reaching this goal, stage by stage, for all areas and for all segments of the population in it. It must not be distracted by a variety of other issues which have been raised in last year’s draft of the Right to Education Bill, such as a common schools system or public or private minority/ majority administered schools or school management committees, etc.

The cost of meeting the right to education as a fundamental right is in any case going to be colossal. There is now a growing demand that the state must concede and fund certain educational rights of the child before it reaches the age of six and after it crosses the age of 12. But even without conceding this demand, implementing the Right to Education Bill as it stands will, according to estimates by the Central Board of Education, cost the state anything between Rs 50,000 crore and Rs 70,000 crore a year for the six years between 6 and 12, in addition to current expenditures on education.

That thought should be sobering enough to clear extraneous considerations out of many heads. But once this need is met, everyone will be as qualified as anyone else to be considered for higher than school education or for jobs thereafter. With everyone standing on the same starting line, many of the yardsticks all will face thereafter will be freed of the most cumbersome criteria which are at present confusing higher education and the job market. The financial cost may thus be considered worth incurring for by-passing the political costs of quotas based on divisive criteria. But we would be buying the worst of both worlds if we funded the Bill and still remained caught in communal controversies fuelled by competing demands for quotas by communities.

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Smoking thoughts
by Harish Dhillon

I had been diagnosed with a mild angina problem and I had become an inveterate chain smoker. On a routine checkup, my doctor was amazed to discover that I had started smoking after the diagnosis.

“Did someone advise you that smoking was good for the heart?” I had no answer but at the time I was not able to quit smoking.

On my first visit to the UK, I was shocked to find how expensive cigarettes were in terms of rupees. Budgetary constraints forced me to cut down on my smoking and I was miserable. My niece took pity on me and every morning, when she packed my lunch, she included two packets of Marlboros. They were not my brand but, as the saying goes, beggars can’t be choosers.

I spent a delightful fortnight being able to visit at last, all the places and buildings that I had read so much about, that I had seen only in movies and picture books. Most of all I loved walking around London. Looking for landmarks connected with the lives of literary and historical personalities whom I so much admired and even more than the walking I enjoyed the short rests on park benches — and London has hundreds of parks — for a quiet cigarette.

It was my last day in London and the effort of trying to pack so much into so short a time had finally caught up with me. I sat on a bench outside the Tate Gallery, smoking cigarette after cigarette and trying to organise the myriads of images that thronged my mind into a coherent order. Suddenly I became aware of someone standing next to me. He was one of the Gallery employees who had been sweeping the surroundings clean.

“A bit of a chain smoker, aren’t you mate,” he said with a friendly smile. “Used to be one myself. So was my brother. I quit when my brother died. Horrible death, slow and painful. Cough, cough, cough all the time, couldn’t breathe, couldn’t sleep, a curse I tell ya. I gave up quick enough and mark my words you’d be best to give it up too.”

After that there was nothing I could do but stub out my cigarette and throw it into the dustbin. On second thought I pulled out what remained of my second packet of cigarettes, crumpled it and threw that too in the dustbin. He gave me an encouraging nod. I wished him good night and made my way homewards along the Thames.

I had walked 30 yards before I realised I was headed in the wrong direction. I turned back.

There on the bench, exactly where I had been sitting earlier, was my would-be guardian angel, his right leg crossed carelessly across his left one, puffing away at a cigarette, my crumpled packet of cigarettes, held casually in his left hand.

I did eventually give up smoking and haven’t smoked a cigarette for six years, but that, as they say, is another story.

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Justice demolished
Delhi law subverts governance
by Jagmohan

FEW of us realise that the issue of illegal constructions and conversions of properties in Delhi is not merely one of civic governance; it extends to a much larger realm of constitutional morality and the way our democracy is functioning in practice.

While dealing with the manifold aspect of the Mailey Yamuna case, the hearing of which has been going on for a number of years, the Supreme Court expressed its deep anguish over serious and large scale violations of civic and environmental laws and also of zoning regulations stipulated in the Delhi Master Plan. Similar concern was voiced by the Delhi High Court in connection with cases that came before it. Both the Courts, in their respective orders, issued strict directions to the Delhi Municipal Corporation to take strong action against illegal constructions and conversions.

In connection with one of the offshoots of the above case, the Supreme Court, noting the inclination of the local authorities to circumvent its orders, was constrained to observe: “It appears that as of today, not a single direction issued by this Court has been implemented since the first order. The continued infraction of the law appears to be encouraged and this has given rise to vested interests who appear to be so powerful as to see that even the orders of this Court are not implemented”.

In view of its past experience, the Supreme Court appointed its own committee and Delhi High Court its own court commissioners to monitor compliance of their orders in recent cases. The Municipal Commissioner was left with no other option but to take action. When he started doing so, a loud protest was orchestrated by vested interests. A special legislation to cover all infringements was enacted with the unanimous support of all political parties, including that of their top national leaders. The Delhi Laws (Special Provisions) Act, 2006, was approved by the Union Cabinet and was passed hurriedly with a voice vote by both the Houses. The moral bankruptcy to which the highest executive and the highest legislative bodies have been dragged by our brand of democracy should be self-evident.

The Delhi Laws (Special Provisions) Act, 2006, has virtually nullified various orders passed by the Supreme Court and Delhi High Court. It regularises all violations of civic laws, however, blatant they may be and whatever may be the magnitude of corruption involved in them. It exposes the hypocrisy of all those political elements who have been talking incessantly of good governance and of ending corruption but doing everything in practice which causes bad governance and boosts corruption.

The aforesaid law has created two classes of citizens — one comprising powerful vested interests who have made democracy a hand-maiden in their design of securing wrongful gains and the others who would be at the receiving end of this design. While the land and building mafia and other lawless groups have been given new muscles and made to believe that they could even get over the orders of the Supreme Court and the High Court, the law-respecting elements stand demoralised, wondering whether they have been wise in not resorting to violations and reaping benefits thereof.

To begin with, the new Act legalises all violations for one year. But the malafide intention to cover these on regular basis could easily be read in between the lines. The ‘statement of object and reason’ appended to the Act virtually rationalises every infringement of law. It also constitutes a subtle attempt to mislead the unwary public. For example, it talks of the gap between supply and demand, conveniently suppressing the fact that if illegal constructions and conversions in Delhi are allowed and if additional residential and commercial spaces could be created unauthorisedly and huge pecuniary benefits secured, no one would think of going elsewhere for residence or business.

That Delhi is a commercial centre and attracts a large number of persons every year was known at the time of finalisation of the Master Plan. The normal increase had been accounted for and the provisions of the Plan were duly approved by all authorities concerned, including the Union Government and Parliament. It is the dishonest implementation, the dishonest activities of a self-serving network of beneficiaries, and dishonest pleas, that are advanced to cover up corruption that are at the root of the problems.

When unauthorised colonies are to be regularised, it is said that there is acute shortage of houses. If it be so, then why are thousands of houses being allowed to be converted into commercial units and why are scores of hectares of commercial areas, such as in Rohini and Dwarka city centres, lying unconstructed and unused? Why at the time of every regularisation of unauthorised colonies for last 30 years, it has been declared: ‘In future, illegal activites would not be tolerated and the offender would be dealt with severely?

What were the top executive and legislative agencies doing when the Capital of the Republic was being robbed of its social, cultural and environmental assets? Why did they wake up only when the Supreme Court and the Delhi High Court showed unusual firmness in securing implementation of its orders through court commissioner? And why was my portfolio suddenly changed when it became clear that I was determined, while functioning as Urban Development Minister in 2000, to clean the Augean stable, enforce the rule of law and break the unholy alliances amongst various vested interests? And how was it that, after virtual stoppage of illegal constructions during the period of my drive, 18,000 new illegal constructions came up soon after my removal from the scene?

The new law is nothing but a perversion of justice. It subverts truth, panders to the wishes of the corrupt and crafty groups and fatally injures whatever little dispositions remain in the society to be honest and law abiding.

The writer is a former Union Minister of Urban Development

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The most expensive bottle in the world
by Jerome Taylor

Despite a long and proud history as Mexico’s national drink, tequila nowadays tends to be regarded as the favourite tipple of barely-clad characters heading for a drunken night out.

But now a company in Mexico is trying to rebrand their country’s favourite firewater as the exclusive preserve of the fabulously wealthy by selling what they describe as the “world’s most expensive bottle of tequila.” At a glitzy launch party in Mexico City earlier this week, Tequila Lay .925, a company that specialises in vintage and premium quality tequila, unveiled a brand new luxury range which included 33 solid platinum bottles selling for an eye-watering $ 225,000 (Rs 1 crore). Such a price tag would almost certainly create the world’s most expensive shot.

“Tonight we are trying for the Guinness Book of Records with the most expensive bottle in the world,” Fernando Altamirano, chief executive of Tequila Ley .925, told guests at the launch party.

Each one of the limited edition containers, which resemble a barbed sea shell and are individually engraved by Mexican artist Alejandro Gomez Oropeza, are filled with the highest quality “Pasion Azteca” tequila, a 100 per cent six year old blue Agave.

For tequila lovers with slightly less disposable income, a further 33 bottles have been commissioned out of gold and platinum and will retail for the slightly cheaper price of $150,000 (Rs 69 lakh) whilst a “budget” range of gold and silver bottles will set buyers back by $25,000 (Rs 11.5 lakh).

According to Mr Altamirano, who has won numerous awards for his company’s unorthodox bottle designs, one buyer has already purchased an undisclosed number of bottles but he refused to say where the offer came from.

“Since we started out, we began with the idea of making the finest, most expensive bottle of tequila in the world,” Mr Altamirano said.

Stuart Claxton, a spokesman from the Guinness Book of Records in New York, said the Mexican company’s claim to have the most expensive bottle of tequila in the world had yet to be verified.

“Whilst we do recognise records for most expensive items, we obviously prefer that these are officially recognised once proof has been produced that someone has actually paid a record breaking price — as opposed to a company simply placing a price tag on an item,” he said.

Much of the Pasion Azteca’s price tag is taken up by the quantity of platinum in the bottle rather than the actual quality of the liquor inside.

According to Guinness World Records, the most expensive bottle of spirit to be sold at auction was in 1992, when an unknown bidder paid £45,483 in 1992 for a 50-year-old bottle of Glenfiddich single malt whiskey in Milan.

The most valuable bottle of wine, a 1787 Chateau Lafite once owned by Thomas Jefferson and engraved with his initials, was sold in 1985 to Christopher Forbes. In 1986, the bottle’s cork dried out under exhibition lights making the wine undrinkable.

By arrangement with The Independent

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Chatterati
HQ, Congress Inc.
by Devi Cherian

IT has taken exactly 18 years for the new Congress office to don the corporate look. It was in 1988 that money was deposited to obtain land for the party building, by Taj Babbar, the then DPCC President.  The new five-storied swanky office right in the middle of the city cost Rs. 2 crore, but has a modest look.

There are three conference halls, a fully computerised environment with Internet facilities, a voicemail recording system and the latest fire alarm system. It is also disabled-friendly and comes with complete power backup.

The conference hall has a podium made of teakwood with a backdrop depicting all Congress leaders.  The steel chairs have nickel polished armchairs and are fixed to the ground. Did they think one would walk away with them? The General Secretaries and Vice-Presidents have their own separate rooms, with enough privacy for all their activities. This is the party’s second office. The first one is Jawahar Bhawan near Windsor Place which is now being used for the Rajiv Gandhi Foundation.

Googly humour

There was an evening of fun and laughter in the Capital last week. Boman Irani’s non-vegetarian jokes and former India cricket captain Kris Srikkant’s cricketing tales kept everyone in splits. Boman Irani’s opening one was of how, as a child, he assumed that his mother was having an affair because whenever the dhobi came, his mother said “Mein Abhi Kapde Nikal Ke Ati Huin”. 

Srikkant also revealed quite a few cricketing anecdotes about veterans like Kapil Dev, Sunil Gavaskar and Sachin Tendulkar.  Only wish Delhi could have more such evenings — after all, laughter is the best medicine.

Healthy exercise

The Health Minister is trying desperately to regain his lost image after the AIIMS controversy. He has decided that the Parliamentarians will now get their heart and lungs checked out in a unique camp in the Parliament annexe.

Looking after

Parliamentarians who have the mandate to see that democracy in the country remains in the pink of health, may be a good PR exercise for Ramadoss. For this week long health mela, specialists are being flown in from Chennai, Mumbai and Bangalore. Cardiologists, eye surgeons, dentist, an ortho-experts along with practitioners of Ayurveda, Yunani, Siddha and Homeopathy will also attend.

They will get a gift too – a specially designed medical kit with Chyavanprash, medicinal plant powders and leaves, and extracts from oil seeds from Kerala.  Once the MPs look after their constitutions, they can take care of their constituencies, with their hearts beating for the right causes, and their fingers on the pulse of the nation. Well! That is expecting too much!

Gentlemen cops

Preparing itself for the Commonwealth Games in 2010, the Delhi Traffic Police has roped in the British High Commission. Keeping in mind the unruly traffic of the city, there is a great need for enhancing the communication skills of the cops and a personality that is more friendly and less intimidating. The Delhi State Government is expecting a major transformation with the British School of Language producing gentlemen cops to welcome the international guests in 2010.

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From the pages of

May 21, 1968

“Papads” to fry

THE proof of the “papad”, as of the pudding, lies in the eating. With Mr Bansi Lal’s election as leader of the Haryana Congress Legislature Party, his “papads” are headed for the frying pan or the fire. The fire started crackling and there was a flash in the pan even at the party meeting when Mr Ranbir Singh reportedly charged certain leaders with creating a “majority complex” and for leaving him out of the get-together at Mr Nanda’s place where Mr Bansi Lal’s “papads” were presumably sampled and pronounced good. Mrs Om Prabha Jain’s retreat was, by comparison, more graceful and with no trace of intimidation. To reward the one or the other with a Deputy Chief Ministership would be the wrong kind of gesture. Mr Birendra Singh had not been particularly lucky with the Deputy Chief Minister, and the Congress need not repeat the experiment.

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When a king aspires to monarchy, he should keep away from games of pleasure like dice. The challenge of dice can corrupt the sanest mind, rob the wisest of his throne and the richest of his wealth.

— The Mahabharata

God is the source of all the creations of the Universe in the same manner as the seed, which holds the key to creation of the leaves, branches and fruit.

— Kabir

One cannot bring the holy image into a temple if the droppings of bats are all around. The eleven bats are our eleven organs, five of action, five of perception and the mind.

— Ramakrishna

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