SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI



THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
W O R L D

N. Korea will conduct N-test
Seoul, October 3
Reclusive North Korea today said that it would conduct its first-ever nuclear test, blaming a US “threat of nuclear war and sanctions” for forcing its hand. The statement by North Korea’s Foreign Ministry was immediately condemned by Japan as “totally unforgivable”.

A South Korean watches a TV news report at the railway station in Seoul

A South Korean watches a TV news report at the railway station in Seoul on Tuesday about North Korea's statement about its possible nuclear test.
— Reuters photo

Security Council lacks political will: India
United Nations, October 3
India has lambasted the 15-member Security Council for failing to meet its obligations of maintaining international peace and security, saying it is the result of its "un-representative" character and consequent lack of political will.



EARLIER STORIES


No proof of ISI’s involvement received: Pak PM
Islamabad, October 3
Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz on Monday rejected Indian allegations of Inter Services Intelligence’s involvement in the Mumbai blasts and said Pakistan had received no evidence so far to support this allegation.

Hijacked Turkish plane lands in Italy
Rome, October 3
Hijackers seeking to send a message to Pope Benedict seized control of a Turkish passenger plane flying from the Albanian capital Tirana to Istanbul today, and were forced by interceptor jets to land in Italy. — Reuters

Al-Qaida HQ in Pak: report
Islamabad, October 3
A letter found when Al-Qaida’s chief operative in Iraq Abu Masab al-Zargawi was killed six months ago said the group’s leadership was based in Pakistan’s tribal region of Waziristan, a media report said today.
— UNI

2 Americans share Nobel for physics
Stolkholm, October 3
Americans John Mather and George Smoot won the 2006 Nobel prize for physics for work that helped shed light on the infancy of the universe, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said today.

John Mather
John Mather

George Smoot
George Smoot

Gandhi Peace Award for Desmond Tutu
Pretoria, October 3
Bishop Desmond Tutu has been named for the Gandhi Peace Award for the year 2006. The announcement was made by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh here last night.

Five girls dead in school shootings
Nickel Mines, Penn, October 3
Two girls died overnight after a school shooting in Pennsylvania, bringing to five the number of students killed when a gunman burst into their one-room schoolhouse, the state police said today.

Top








 

N. Korea will conduct N-test

Seoul, October 3
Reclusive North Korea today said that it would conduct its first-ever nuclear test, blaming a US “threat of nuclear war and sanctions” for forcing its hand.

The statement by North Korea’s Foreign Ministry was immediately condemned by Japan as “totally unforgivable”.

Its announcement capped weeks of rumours that the Stalinist state was planning a test and came amid increasingly bitter relations with the outside world after it test-fired missiles in July.

“The US extreme threat of a nuclear war and sanctions and pressure compel the DPRK (North Korea) to conduct a nuclear test, an essential process for bolstering nuclear deterrent, as a corresponding measure for defence,” the statement said.

But it added that North Korea would never use nuclear weapons first and would “do its utmost to realise the denuclearisation of the peninsula and give impetus to the worldwide nuclear disarmament and the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons”.

Analysts say it probably has enough fissile material to make six to eight nuclear bombs but probably does not have the technology to make one small enough to mount on a missile. — Reuters

Top

 

Security Council lacks political will: India
Dharam Shourie

United Nations, October 3
India has lambasted the 15-member Security Council for failing to meet its obligations of maintaining international peace and security, saying it is the result of its "un-representative" character and consequent lack of political will.

In a sharp criticism of the Council's inaction as the "tragic events" unfolded in Lebanon recently and the West Asian peace process was derailed, Indian Ambassador Nirupam Sen likened the Council to Emperor Nero who was fiddling while Rome was burning.

"The main problem that beset peacekeeping are not lack of resources or even personnel, but an un-representative Security Council which lacks the political will to act and when it does, does so in a manner that is entirely inadequate," he told the United Nations General Assembly.

Asking the Council members to shore up their participation in the peacekeeping operations, Sen said it is a "distressing reflection" on their willingness to share the burden of maintaining international peace and security when overwhelming number of troops in the peacekeeping operations are contributed by the developing nations.

Stressing that reform of the United Nations, which the major power are demanding, would be incomplete without the expansion of the 15-member Council, he said it needs to be made more representative and effective if it is to satisfactorily perform the role mandated to it by the charter.

It is imperative, Sen said, that any expansion and restructuring of the Council must include developing countries in both permanent and non permanent categories.

Pointing out that developing countries remain “grossly under-represented” in the Council even though most of its decision affect them, Sen said the voice of developing nations and their empowerment in the international arena is vital for levelling the “so called playing fields.” Criticising the permanent five members (P-5) of the Council for hindering real reforms, Sen said, “What some of the P-5 suffer from — a virtue they share with the Russian Tsars, the French Bourbons and the English Stuarts — is areification of the present - an unwillingness to accept that institutions can be different.” — PTI

Top

 

No proof of ISI’s involvement received: Pak PM
By arrangement with The Dawn

Islamabad, October 3
Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz on Monday rejected Indian allegations of Inter Services Intelligence’s involvement in the Mumbai blasts and said Pakistan had received no evidence so far to support this allegation.

Talking to newsmen after an Iftar-dinner hosted by an English daily in honour of ambassadors of Muslim countries, the Prime Minister said: “India has a history of levelling such allegations but has never been able to prove any of them”.

Asked whether the fresh Indian blame game could affect the ongoing dialogue process, the premier said: “Pakistan stands for peace in the region and desires a solution of the Kashmir dispute in accordance with the aspirations of the people of Kashmir”.

To a query regarding the steps to be taken on the mechanism of combating terrorism, Mr Aziz said: “First of all we would like that the upcoming foreign secretary-level talks get under way and then talks on terrorism”.

About the controversial Protection of Women Rights Bill, he said talks were in progress with all stakeholders and the process of giving the draft final shape was in an advanced stage.

He said the National Assembly session would be convened by consultations after the holy month of Ramazan.

Top

 

2 Americans share Nobel for physics

Stolkholm, October 3
Americans John Mather and George Smoot won the 2006 Nobel prize for physics for work that helped shed light on the infancy of the universe, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said today.

They won the prize for discovering “the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation”, which offered insights into the origin of the universe, galaxies and stars, the academy said as it announced the award worth $1.37 million. — Reuters

Top

 

Gandhi Peace Award for Desmond Tutu

Pretoria, October 3
Bishop Desmond Tutu has been named for the Gandhi Peace Award for the year 2006. The announcement was made by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh here last night.

Bishop Desmond received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 in recognition of ‘‘the courage and heroism shown by black South Africans in their use of peaceful methods in the struggle against apartheid’’.

He was born in 1931 in Klerksdorp, Transvaal. He studied at Johannesburg Bantu High School and then graduated from the University of South Africa in 1954.

In 1975, Bishop Desmond was appointed Dean of St Mary’s Cathedral in Johannesburg, the first black to hold that position. From 1976 to 1978 he was Bishop of Lesotho, and in 1978 became the first black General Secretary of the South African Council of Churches.

He is also an honorary doctor of a number of leading universities in the USA, Britain and Germany. — UNI

Top

 

Five girls dead in school shootings

Nickel Mines, Penn, October 3
Two girls died overnight after a school shooting in Pennsylvania, bringing to five the number of students killed when a gunman burst into their one-room schoolhouse, the state police said today.

It was the third deadly US school shooting in the past week and took place in an Amish farm community where there is little crime.

The gunman, identified as Charles Carl Roberts (32), killed himself after lining his victims against the wall and shooting them execution-style in the head.

The two girls who died overnight were aged 7 and 8 years, said Commissioner Jeffrey Miller of the Pennsylvania state police. One other girl remained in critical condition and another four were described as stable, the state police said. — Reuters

 

 

Top

 

HOME PAGE | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Opinions |
| Business | Sports | World | Mailbag | Chandigarh | Ludhiana | Delhi |
| Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |