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Taliban behead ‘US spy’ in Pak
Miranshah (Pakistan), November 3
Pakistani Taliban fighters beheaded a tribal cleric accused of being a U.S. spy in the Waziristan region bordering Afghanistan, a security official in the restive tribal region said.

4 Palestinian ultras killed in Israeli air strike
Beit Hanoun (Gaza), November 3
An Israeli air strike today killed four Palestinian militants in Gaza intensifying violence as the army pushes on with one of its biggest offensives in the Gaza Strip in months.

Spousal violence among Indo-Canadians raises concern
Toronto, November 3
Spousal violence within the Indo-Canadian community is a cancer in society, says the Attorney General of Canada's largest province, British Columbia.

Computer Associates ex-CEO sentenced
New York, November 3
Former Chief Executive of Computer Associates, Sanjay Kumar, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for his role in a $ 2.2 billion accounting fraud in the software company, which was among the top five at one time.

Indo-Canadian appointed Citizenship Judge
Toronto, November 3
An Indo-Canadian has been appointed as a Citizenship Judge by the Canadian Government. Raminder Singh Gill, a politician and former member of Ontario's provincial Parliament, is among the four Citizenship Judges appointed by the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Monte Solberg, according to a press release.

Indian-American surgeon to be honoured
New York, November 3
An Indian American surgeon, who immigrated from Madhya Pradesh, has been selected for the Physician of the Year Award by the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary. Dr Navin Mehta, surgeon director in Otolaryngology at the same Infirmary, will be presented the 2006 John Kearney Rodgers Physician of the Year Award on November 20 in New York.


Activists of the Opposition Pakistan Muslim League Party raise slogans in Multan on Friday to protest against an army airstrike on a religious school in the Chenagai area of the Bajaur tribal region bordering Afghanistan.
Activists of the Opposition Pakistan Muslim League Party raise slogans in Multan on Friday to protest against an army airstrike on a religious school in the Chenagai area of the Bajaur tribal region bordering Afghanistan. — Reuters

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Taliban behead ‘US spy’ in Pak

Miranshah (Pakistan), November 3
Pakistani Taliban fighters beheaded a tribal cleric accused of being a U.S. spy in the Waziristan region bordering Afghanistan, a security official in the restive tribal region said.

The body of Maulana Salahuddin, (45) was found on Friday on a road between North and South Waziristan, two semi-autonomous regions regarded as hotbeds of support for Al Qaida and the Taliban fighting NATO, US and Afghan forces across the border.

A note pinned to the cleric's body described him as an American spy. The corpse was sprayed with bullets after the beheading. Pakistan's government signed a pact with tribal leaders in North Waziristan on September 5 to end clashes between pro-Taliban militants and Pakistani security forces.

Since the deal was reached, US military officials say, attacks against US-led NATO troops and Afghan government forces have tripled. Pro-Taliban tribesmen appear to be violating the pact also by setting up a parallel administration in North Waziristan, just as they did after a similar treaty in South Waziristan.

Taliban commanders in Wana, the main town in South Waziristan, on Friday addressed a jirga, or tribal council, attended by about 300 tribal elders to issue new rules on punishing collaborators and criminals, as well as for collecting funds to finance their operations. Collaborators' families would be warned first, and the suspect would be executed unless they desisted.

Seven men convicted of banditry by the Taliban were paraded in a Wana bazaar after having had their hair torn out in fistfuls as a punishment. — Reuters

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4 Palestinian ultras killed in Israeli air strike

Beit Hanoun (Gaza), November 3
An Israeli air strike today killed four Palestinian militants in Gaza intensifying violence as the army pushes on with one of its biggest offensives in the Gaza Strip in months.

With the latest attack, 20 Palestinians have so far been killed, more than half of them militants, since the Israeli troops entered the northern Gaza town of Beit Hanoun on Wednesday. One Israeli soldier has been killed in the operation.

Hamas sources said a vehicle carrying four members belonging to an elite unit of the group's armed wing was targeted by the missile in the Gaza City. An Israeli military source confirmed an ''aerial attack on a vehicle carrying terrorists''.

Ammar Mushtaha, a Hamas commander, who had survived previous assassination attempts, was among the four killed, as well as bodyguard for one of the ministers in the Hamas-led government.

The offensive in northern Gaza, partly to try to halt militant rocket attacks on Israel, has further weakened any chance of peace talks, already minimal since the Hamas won elections. Hamas is sworn to Israel's destruction.

Israeli troops also exchanged fire with 60 Palestinian gunmen holed up in inside a mosque in the centre of Beit Hanoun. Witnesses said Israeli bulldozers had demolished a wall of the mosque, adding troops fired stun grenades and teargas to try to force the gunmen to surrender. An Israeli military source said some militants had given themselves up. — Reuters

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Spousal violence among Indo-Canadians raises concern

Toronto, November 3
Spousal violence within the Indo-Canadian community is a cancer in society, says the Attorney General of Canada's largest province, British Columbia.

"Spousal violence is an issue of the community at large. But it's more acute in the South Asian community," Wally Oppal said, following a series of violent acts against Indo-Canadian women.

On Sunday, Navreet Waraich, mother of a four-month-old boy, was fatally stabbed in Surrey, British Columbia, which has a large Indo-Canadian population. Her husband Jatinder, a cab driver, was arrested and charged with second-degree murder.

On October 20, Gurjeet Kaur Ghuman, a nurse in Coquitlam in the Lower Mainland region, was shot on her face by her estranged husband Paramjit Singh Ghuman.

Paramjit then turned the gun and shot himself, while Gurjeet remains in critical condition.

Three days later, the charred body of a four-month pregnant teacher, Manjit Panghali, also a resident of Surrey, was found from the Delta region of British Columbia, five days after she went missing from her home. No arrest has been made.

"This is a horrible social and criminal problem that our community has done nothing about," Oppal, who himself is an Indo-Canadian, told the Vancouver Sun.

"We have simply closed our eyes. It has horrible origins. It is the systemic demeaning of women," he said.

Oppal, a former judge, said he had heard a number of cases of domestic violence during his time.

Indo-Canadians comprise 4.75 per cent of British Columbia's total population of over four million.

He said some aspects of the Indo-Canadian culture encouraged men to discriminate against women, including favouring male infants and dowry payments to grooms' families. "I don't like the cliché of ownership but I think it's appropriate in this (Ghuman) case that it's time to send out the message that this is clearly, clearly wrong," he told the Globe and Mail newspaper.

He said some people within the community were so concerned about public reputation that they didn't want to get help when there was a problem. "Let's just solve it within the house," the Sun quoted Oppal as saying.

Meanwhile, the three incidents have alarmed leaders of the Indo-Canadian community. An emergency forum was organised yesterday by an ethnic Indian radio station, Radio India, in Surrey.

Radio India owner Maninder Singh Gill has also put up a $50,000 reward for information leading to arrest in the Panghali murder.

Raminder Dosanjh, a social activist and founder of the India Mahila Association, said the three cases demand a community response. — IANS

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Computer Associates ex-CEO sentenced

New York, November 3
Former Chief Executive of Computer Associates, Sanjay Kumar, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for his role in a $ 2.2 billion accounting fraud in the software company, which was among the top five at one time.

Kumar was also fined $ 8 million but it was deferred till the court determines the restitution he should make to the victims of the fraud, which is expected to be known by February 2. After serving the sentence, he will face three years supervised release.

Kumar, 44, who immigrated from Sri Lanka, was among several executives of the company who are charged in connection of use of fraudulent accounting practices to inflate the sales to give the impression that the company was meeting quarterly expectations in 1999 and 2000.

He had pleaded guilty to the charges in April, which included conspiracy, obstruction to justice and fraud and US District Judge Leo Glasser, who imposed the sentence, asked him to report to a federal prison by February 27 to start serving the sentence.

US Attorney Roslynn R Maukopf said that the sentence sends the message that accounting fraud and obstruction of justice would "inevitably make things worse, not better, for defendants under investigation." He was also charged with wiping the hard drive of a laptop computer after he was asked to preserve the evidence. — PTI

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Indo-Canadian appointed Citizenship Judge

Toronto, November 3
An Indo-Canadian has been appointed as a Citizenship Judge by the Canadian Government.

Raminder Singh Gill, a politician and former member of Ontario's provincial Parliament, is among the four Citizenship Judges appointed by the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Monte Solberg, according to a press release.

There are 15 Citizenship Judges across Canada who process about 150,000 applications for citizenship each year. He is the only Indo-Canadian among them and the first in Ontario.

Mr Gill is an active member of the University of Toronto Chemical Engineering faculty advisory board and works as an international consultant — IANS

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Indian-American surgeon to be honoured

New York, November 3
An Indian American surgeon, who immigrated from Madhya Pradesh, has been selected for the Physician of the Year Award by the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Dr Navin Mehta, surgeon director in Otolaryngology at the same Infirmary, will be presented the 2006 John Kearney Rodgers Physician of the Year Award on November 20 in New York. Dr Mehta graduated in medicine from Rewa in Madhya Pradesh in 1974 and went to the USA.

"We are proud to honour him for his extraordinary compassion, expertise and commitment to those in need of healing," Joseph P. Corcoran, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Infirmary, said, according to the News India-Times, an ethnic Indian newspaper. — IANS

 

 

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