SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
M A I L B A G

Poll reforms must to ban criminals

HK. Dua’s front-page editorial, “When a criminal can sit in the Union Cabinet” (Nov 30) was thought provoking. Regional political parties play a vital role in the formation of ministries at the Centre. Therefore, the Election Commission should debar them from contesting parliamentary elections. They must be confined to their respective states only.

Candidates of only recognised national political parties of some standing should be allowed to contest elections. Independent MPs retain their intrinsic value. For, they can support or join any conglomerate coming to power after the elections. No one should be allowed to contest as an independent candidate. This will check most systemic ills.

Criminals should not have the voting right. Nor should they hold ministerial posts during their trial which must be expedited. Electoral reforms are a must to ban criminals from contesting the elections. For the speedy dispensation of justice, courts should work in two shifts. We need Indian Judicial Service on the pattern of the IAS to ensure a steady flow of competent judges.

LALIT BHARDWAJ, Panchkula


 

II

Mr Dua has rightly highlighted the flaws in the political system. The common man is very happy to see the judiciary’s pro-active role in preventing the gross miscarriage of justice. Court cases pertaining to Mr Shibu Soren, Jessica Lal, Nitish Katara, Telgi and Ms Mayawati are some recent examples where the judges have shown exemplary courage and professional integrity by ordering a thorough re-investigation and retrial.

Those politicians who do not honour the oath they take when they enter Parliament or State Assembly must be identified by the alert public and rejected during the subsequent elections.

The media should also continue to enlighten the public about the misdeeds of selfish politicians, errant bureaucrats and rich individuals who misuse money power.

DALIP SINGH SIDHU, Patiala

III

We the people are not ashamed of our politicians’ conduct. Instead we are proud of their criminal conduct. We have not learnt lessons from tainted and corrupt politicians like Mr Shibu Soren.

In the United States, a criminal is put on an electric chair and he/she dies. In Arab countries, criminals are brought to the open ground and shot dead. In Japan, they have their method to teach criminals a lesson. But in India, Mera Bharat Mahan, we honour corrupt people by garlanding them and making them ministers. Are we fit for democracy? Certainly not. We need a strong hand, i.e. danda. May God save India.

BAKHSHISH SINGH ARORA, Jalandhar

IV

Owing to political compulsions, the Prime Minister inducted tainted persons in his Cabinet. Inordinate delay in the dispensation of justice is the root-cause of all social and political ills. We have inherited this system from the British and it does not suit our society.

The political system will continue to remain a sanctuary for the corrupt and criminals unless and until we speed up the dispensation of justice.

SHYAM SUNDER AIRI, Kapurthala

V

Our Constitution is so simple that a “housewife” can be called from her kitchen to take over as Chief Minister of the state only because her husband is involved in a corruption case. Some leaders seem to feel that they are the sole descendants of gods, goddesses, great yogis and saints and, therefore, they are the only legitimate claimants of Hindutva and Bharatiyata.

Sometimes, one wonders where our freedom fighters faltered while achieving freedom for the country. All sorts of deceitful and dirty politicians are bent upon grabbing power. The Constitution is silent on tainted ministers. Criminals, murderers, the corrupt and scamsters should not be made ministers.

K. MURARI, Chandigarh

Deplorable incident

This is regarding the death of two Chandigarh students due to the negligence of sports organisers who sent them after reportedly charging money from them. Effective measures are needed to prevent such incidents.

Why were the Chandigarh college students and residents of Rajpura made to represent a Himachal sports organisation without the permission of the college and parents? Such mismanagement is not new to sports persons, who are often duped by similar bodies under the pretext of providing them participation certificates (though often after paying a price).

There is no regulatory body to look into the affairs of these associations. Rarely a student who gets admission to professional institutions through sports-quota seats, even after participating at the national/international level, ever displays his or her sportsman’s passion at these institutions. Why?

Such murky looking sports promoting schemes that have not been upgraded since their inception promote only mediocrity. That is why India is not shining in sports at the international level despite a huge human resource.

BALVINDER, Chandigarh

 


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