SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
M A I L B A G

Centre in a fix over OBC quota

The Supreme Courtís interim stay on the Central law providing 27 per cent reservation for the OBCs is most welcome. The apex court has indeed come to the rescue of general category students who were feeling ignored in the present set up.

The government, in its eagerness to appease the OBCs, extended 27 per cent quota to them in institutions of higher education without doing its homework properly.

It failed to justify the quota as it had not done any survey to buttress its claims despite the Supreme Courtís rulings in earlier cases. The Centre finds itself in a tight spot today because of the political ramifications in the light of the ensuing UP elections. It should refrain from enacting another legislation overriding the court ruling. Quota on the basis of caste is a political fraud and this must stop.

V.K. GUPTA, Kurukshetra


 

II

Our politicians of all political hues have twisted and defaced the Constitution for protecting their respective vote banks in past 60 years. While there is no consideration for the economically poor in the general category, quotas have remained in the hands of powerful and influential families, depriving those who needed it most.

The Centre should review the entire quota scene. It must examine family units who have enjoyed the quota benefit many times in the past and the justification for its continuance now.

RAMESH KAUSHAL, New York (USA)

III

The Supreme Court has given relief to thousands of talented students who would have missed seats in IIMs and IITs and other institutions due to 27 per cent reservation for the OBCS.

The politicians are always worried about their vote banks and make laws to suit their interests in the elections. They care two hoots about general merit and the studentsí future. The stay order on the OBC quota is right and should be appreciated. The government has every right to formulate policies to raise the living standard of backward classes and give them more opportunities in educational institutions, but reservation will foment tension and bitterness and it is not the solution. Thus, the government should come forward with some other plan to help them permanently and satisfy students of all castes and sub-castes.

SHAILESH KUMAR, Bangalore

Waiting in the court

Can senior judicial officers ignore the Supreme Courtís directive that the members of medical profession should not be unnecessarily called to the courts and, if called for evidence as expert witnesses they should be allowed to go as early as possible keeping in view the nature of their duties to the patients.

Recently I appeared in the court of a senior judicial officer as expert witness in a murder case and informed the court of my arrival. I had to wait for more than an hour though the court was busy in some civil cases. This might be happening to many doctors who otherwise are not willing to highlight the matter due to fear of the court and ignorance of the law and the Supreme Courtís directions.

Being a representative of the associations of forensic medicine experts and in-service doctors of the state, it is my duty to highlight this problem being faced by the medical professionals. I appeal to all concerned to do the needful in public interest.

Dr D.S. BHULLAR, Patiala

Top

 

 
HOME PAGE | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Opinions |
| Business | Sports | World | Mailbag | Chandigarh | Ludhiana | Delhi |
| Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |