HEALTH & FITNESS

Unmanaged anger is injurious to health
Dr R. Kumar
N
eera, 35, has multiple complaints: foggy vision to eye-ache, headaches to sleeplessness, high blood pressure to digestive problems and many others. Anger is visible at her face at the slightest provocation. She slams down the phone when faced with several calls.

Take care of skin & defy age
Dr Gurinderjit Singh
I
F you have skin problems or your skin condition is affecting your personality, do not get disheartened. Cosmetic dermatology can help you considerably. It can make patients look better and feel good about themselves.

EYESIGHT
Rehabilitation of the visually impaired
Dr Mahipal Sachdev
Helen Keller changed the life of blind and deaf people. She has set an example for the world what a blind person can achieve. Today there are about 161 million people in world who are visually impaired out of which about 35-43 million are in India.

Health Notes

  • “Memory pill” just got closer to reality

  • Expectant mothers who smoke more likely to have girls

  • Diabetics found more prone to memory problems

  • Cocoa, not tea, calms blood pressure





Top








Unmanaged anger is injurious to health
Dr R. Kumar

Neera, 35, has multiple complaints: foggy vision to eye-ache, headaches to sleeplessness, high blood pressure to digestive problems and many others. Anger is visible at her face at the slightest provocation. She slams down the phone when faced with several calls. She gets into a shouting match with a stranger over a parking space at the mall. She puts her fist through the wall after an argument with her spouse. She has not been on talking terms with her mother-in-law ever since she came home after marriage.

It is well known that inappropriately expressed anger can be harmful. Whether you’re overly passive and keep your anger pent up, whether you’re prone to violent outbursts or whether you’re quietly seething with rage, you may have headaches, sleep difficulties, high blood pressure or digestive problems. Stress and hostility related to anger can lead to heart attacks if you are expressing anger in a hostile, aggressive manner. Anger or hatred that’s out of control can be destructive, leading to problems in your relationships, at work, in your enjoyment of life and with health. Watch out: do you experience physical reactions such as muscle tension or a racing heart when you get angry? It is a warning that something is wrong somewhere.

What causes people to become angry?

There’s usually an activating event — something in particular that sets you off such as a disagreement at work, being stuck in traffic or not being able to get through to an actual person on the phone. Some people may be angry about their own personal circumstances, such as financial problems or ego clash or struggle for dominance with mother-in-law.

How to handle anger in a healthy way?

Trying to suppress or deny your anger can lead to a host of physical complaints such as headaches, depression, stress and sleeping or eating difficulties. It can also lead you to erupt into violent behaviour if your anger has been simmering for a long time. Managing anger effectively can benefit you and those around you. Your health may improve, you’ll feel better about yourself, and your relationships with others may improve.

You may have built up years of feeling unheard, ignored, sad, frustrated or disrespected. From the activating event that initially triggers your anger, you move along a continuum where you feel a number of things, such as intensifying agitation or irritation, and then your personal history comes into play and you may explode, especially if you don’t step back to think about where your anger is heading to. Also, if you were taught that being angry was negative, you may not have learned how to express anger.

Some anger management techniques include:

  • Self-talk to remind oneself and be aware of one’s angry reactions.
  • Walking away from the situation until one calms down.
  • Remembering to treat other people like he’d want to be treated.
  • Agreeing to disagree, and leaving it at that.

A patient may also need professional help or qualified anger management sessions to help him unlearn the angry behaviours. An anger management session is a way to teach people how to express their anger in a controlled way. So, for the angry person the professional would work with him on realising that he doesn’t need to yell and scream and get aggressive when he’s angry. They would also work with him on issues he may have with his upbringing, such as being in an abusive household.

The writer, an eye specialist, has to his credit many books on health-related subjects.

Top

Take care of skin & defy age
Dr Gurinderjit Singh

IF you have skin problems or your skin condition is affecting your personality, do not get disheartened. Cosmetic dermatology can help you considerably. It can make patients look better and feel good about themselves.

The cosmetic dermatologist’s tools can be divided into the following categories: the 4 Rs – refilling, relaxing, resurfacing and resuspending.

Refilling: Dermal fillers fill in deep creases or furrows and the treatment involves injecting hyaluronic acid (restylene), using a fine needle inserted at several points. If you are relatively happy with the shape of your face and just want to turn the clock back, then refilling is the answer. While the results of these fillers last only a limited period of time, they provide a quick cosmetic boost to the looks and the psyche. They are fast and easy, and entail no recovery time. A lunch-time visit is all it takes.

Relaxing: Botox is a toxin derived from a bacteria and when injected it works by paralysing the connection between the muscles and the nerves, thus erasing unwanted lines. The safety profile is excellent and the major advantage is that its effects are temporary and reversible. The diluted form of the toxin is injected into the overactive muscle and the pain is minimal, almost like a mosquito sting. The office procedure requires only 10-15 minutes. For those who fear or dread the sight of a knife or the idea of surgery, botox is a boon.

Resurfacing: Our skin is a living organ made up of millions of cells. Everyday thousands of cells fall off and are replaced by new cells from below. This is slow and haphazard process. It does not allow the skin to shed off either dark spots or the lifeless, sun-damaged dull-complexion skin. Resurfacing causes an even, controlled shedding of the damaged cells.

Resuspending: Non-ablative radiofrequency is a non-surgical facelift, which generates heat through resistance in the lower dermal skin layer as well as in the subcutaneous tissue. The energy heats the collagen deep in the dermal layer, leading to an immediate firming of the skin. Over time, collagen synthesis is stimulated, leading to a more youthful look. Unlike lasers, it can be performed on patients of all skin types.

The writer is chief Dermatologist, Mohan Dai Oswal Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Ludhiana.

Top

EYESIGHT
Rehabilitation of the visually impaired
Dr Mahipal Sachdev

Helen Keller changed the life of blind and deaf people. She has set an example for the world what a blind person can achieve.

Today there are about 161 million people in world who are visually impaired out of which about 35-43 million are in India. Of these, 25-28 million are actually suffering from low vision. This has a huge impact on the emotional and economic demands of the family and society.

A person with low vision is one who has difficulty in managing his day-to-day activities without the assistance of special visual aids. They have an impairment of vision function even after treatment or standard refractive corrections like glasses or contact lenses. But they can use or are potentially able to use vision for planning or execution of a task with the help of these low visual aids.

These low vision patients usually face problems like the following:

  • Bumping into objects while moving
  • Poor night vision or poor vision in less illuminated places
  • Fluctuating vision
  • Inability to find lost objects
  • Poor colour discrimination
  • Sensitivity to light and glare
  • The aim of management of these patients:
  • to enhance vision
  • to make them independent
  • to enhance the quality of life

This can be done by improving their visual performance with the aid of various optical and non-optical devices. Environmental modifications also do a lot of difference to them.

Various devices called low visual aids are available to improve the visual performances. These include telescopes, the magnifiers available as hand-held/ stand magnifiers/spectacle magnifiers. The CCTV provides magnified images and also talking instruction/learning materials. Talking devices like talking books, calculators and clocks make their life much easier. Most of these devices magnify an image by enlarging it or bringing it closer. The patient has to hold the object close to face to see it clearly, which may be annoying to many but that way only they can see the text better.

The world has changed a lot since Helen’s days and now so many options are available to improve the quality of life of a visually handicapped person. So, every effort should be made to help patients achieve a positive attitude about their capabilities to use residual vision successfully and to live a full and enjoyable life.

Rehabilitation of a visually handicapped patient is a satisfying service.

In Helen’s own words:

“The public must learn that the blind man is neither genius nor a freak nor an idiot. He has a mind that can be educated, a hand which can be trained, ambitions which it is right for him to strive to realise, and it is the duty of the public to help him make the best of himself so that he can win light through work.”

The writer is Chairman and Medical Director, Centre for Sight, New Delhi. Email: msachdev@bol.net.in

Top

Health Notes

“Memory pill” just got closer to reality

LONDON: Scientists at McGill University in Montreal have announced that the world’s first pill to rescue memory in Alzheimer’s patients may soon be developed, for they have identified a gene mutation that affects the memory of mice.

For their study, the scientists inactivated the gene in mice before they swam around a water maze, and noted an improvement in the performance of altered mice.

They, however, observed that an increased gene activity worsened the performance of the mice’s memory.

This gene is also thought to exist in humans, and boffins are now hoping to find molecules that target and inhibit its activities, which may ultimately pave the way for a memory-enhancing pill. — ANI

Expectant mothers who smoke more likely to have girls

LONDON: Paediatricians at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine suggest that expectant mothers who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to have girls than boys.

The investigators also say that the chance of having a male baby drops by almost half if both parents smoke during early pregnancy, for they have found fresh evidence that smoking could “kill” male foetuses in the womb.

An extensive study conducted by them says that smoking not only reduces the chances of conceiving a male child, but could also stop male embryos implanting in the womb and cause miscarriages. — ANI

Diabetics found more prone to memory problems

CHICAGO: Diabetics are at higher risk of getting a type of mild memory impairment that may later develop into Alzheimer’s disease, US researchers said.

Several studies have shown that people with diabetes are at greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

A new study, published in the Archives of Neurology on Monday, found diabetes was linked to a significantly higher risk of a memory problem known as mild cognitive impairment. — Reuters

Cocoa, not tea, calms blood pressure

Chicago: Some may see a cup of tea as soothing but chocolate is more likely to lower one’s blood pressure, German researchers reported.

Foods rich in cocoa appear to reduce blood pressure but drinking green and black tea may not, according to an analysis of previously published research in the Archives of Internal Medicine, published by the American Medical Association on Monday.

The drop in blood pressure among participants who consumed cocoa products for at least two weeks was in the same range as achieved by someone taking drugs commonly prescribed to control high blood pressure. — Reuters

HOME PAGE

Top