L U D H I A N A   S T O R I E S

‘Global warming may redistribute rainfall’
Vimal Sumbly
Tribune News Service

Ludhiana, May 18
J.S.Samra, member of the PAU Board of Management and deputy director-general, Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi, who has been appointed chief executive officer (CEO), National Rainfed Area Authority (NRAA), for a period of five years, has said that global warming, high frequency and intensity of extreme weather events and melting of glaciers will redistribute rainfall, water balance, rise in sea level and change the aquatic system.

According to Samra, this would require mitigations, adaptations, diversification of land uses, management of risks and vulnerability. This gigantic task would require unified approach of convergence and utilisation of inter-governmental, inter-ministerial and inter-departmental networking, he added.

Giving an example, Dr Samra said forests, sequesters greenhouse gases, support livestock rearing, provide fuel wood, medicinal products and are the best bet to reduce floods, soil erosion and enhance ground water recharging for enhancing productivity of input intensive agriculture.

Management of wastelands is being considered for producing bio-diesel. Reclamation of these lands has been and will continue to compensate diversion of agricultural land for non-agriculture purposes.

He felt that assets can be generated by organising landless, small and marginal farmers around wastelands to reduce poverty by enhancing income, employment and environmental services sustainably.

In the highly productive states like Punjab, Haryana, western UP, parts of West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, etc. simultaneous or integrated management of both surface and ground water resources has been highly successful and sustainable.

It is, therefore, believed that a symphony of planning and networking of surface and ground water resources can convert many threats of water logging, secondary salination and over exploitation of aquifers into opportunities of better livelihood.

Samra’s new assignment is expected to converge, complement, harmonise, rationalise, prioritise and coordinate resource development strategies of five ministries. Facilitation, capacity building, evaluation and a common approach will be endeavoured by this policy making and advisory think tank. This technically expert body is also mandated to prepare perspective plans, prioritise investments, identify gaps in inputs, credit, technologies, national and state level institutions, issues of landless and marginal farmers, safety networks, research etc. 

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Mealy bug appears in Bathinda area
Tribune News Service

Ludhiana, May 18
Mealy bug attack on tomatoes, desi cotton, jawar, congress weed and bukain tree has been reported from villages of Mirjeana, Kaureana and Gehle Wala in Talwandi Sabo block of district Bathinda. PAU scientists who surveyed the area have revealed that the stacks of cotton sticks in the fields especially near shady trees and water channels and pre-sowing irrigation of cotton may be acting as a source of this pest which is migrating to weeds and other crops including trees.

To check the spread of this pest, the farmers have been advised to regularly rough out the weeds growing adjacent to road sides, pathways, water channels and waste lands.

Farmers should destroy the infested host plants along with the pest very carefully preferably by burning/deep burying and never to throw in open/water channels.

Scientists have advised the farmers to control the pest by spraying chloropyriphos 20EC @ 2 litres or profenphos 50 EC @ 500 ml or acephate 75 SP @ 800g or quinalphos 25 EC @ 800 ml or carbaryl 50 WP @ 1 kg or thiodicarb 75 WP @ 250 g per acre by using 100 litres of water.

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Expose wheat to sunlight to prevent smut, farmers told
Tribune News Service

Ludhiana, May 18
In a message to the farmers, Dr Satvinder Kaur Mann, head, Department of Plant Pathology and Dr D.P. Pannu have suggested controlling of loose smut in wheat through proper exposure to sunlight in the months of May and June.

Dr Mann said that loose smut was destroying wheat in many areas of Punjab. This disease was internally seed-borne, she added. Explaining its appearance, Dr Mann said a black loose powdery mass was produced in place of grains. When the powder was blown away by wind, the rachis was left behind. The fungus grew within the plant and no symptom was visible till flowering occurred.

The scientists informed that though chemicals had been recommended for the control of loose smut, yet there were ways to check it with the help of sunlight in these two months.

Giving details on control method, they said the wheat seed should be soaked in ordinary water from 8 am to 12 noon. After four hours of soaking, the moist seed should be spread out in the sun in a thin layer on cloth or Hessian.

Completely dried grains could then be stored in a dry place till further sowing, they added.

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Save water by using laser leveller: Expert
Tribune News Service

Ludhiana, May 18
"Water is precious and every drop should be used judiciously," said PAU the director of Extension Education, Dr N.S.Malhi, while speaking to farmers at a field day on laser levelling organised at Fatehgarh Sahib.

Impressing upon the farmers that sustainability of agriculture heavily depends upon availability of irrigation water that was fast declining, Dr Malhi said the use of laser leveller not only helps in reducing water requirement but also improves input and water use efficiency.

He advocated for promoting the use of laser leveller among farmers.

Dr M.P.Kaushal, head, Department of Soil and Water Engineering, told the farmers that "laser leveller" being costly, should be purchased by every co-operative societies so that farmers could avail themselves of the services on custom hiring basis.

He informed that in laser levelled fields, up to 25 per cent of irrigation water can be saved. Farm scientists Dr Sunil Garg and Samanpreet Kaur demonstrated the working of laser leveller to about 150 farmers.

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World Museum Day 
Jesus school students set up mini-museum
Our Correspondent

Ludhiana, May 18
Students of Jesus Sacred Heart School, South City, Ludhiana, celebrated World Museum Day here today by setting up a mini-museum depicting the rich cultural heritage of Punjab. It gave a vivid revelation of the customs and conventions, beauties and bounties, teachings and traditions of Punjab.

The museum displayed Punjabi kitchen with the typical food and an exclusive collection of a chullah, madani, chakki and other utensils. Leaving an indelible impression on all minds was a treasure house of handicrafts, embroidered daris, sheets, hand fans, phulkari and above all the heart of Punjabi culture, charkha. The huge clay model of a village rendered an exquisite sight.

A cavalcade of children in multicoloured punjabi dresses presented various models of agriculture, animal husbandry, music, martial arts, and displayed the essence of religion, the great personalities of Punjab, freedom fighters, the literary heritage, the rising modernity through education and health and technology.

Folk dance by Palak of Class I was the centre of attraction. Amanjot of Class IX spoke on the rich culture of Punjab and the need to preserve it, while Tarun of Class IX spoke about the significance of museums. Principal Gurnam Kaur Grewal threw light on the rich cultural heritage of Punjab backed by its traditional social values. 

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NSS Camp
Art of tie and dye taught
Our Correspondent

Ludhiana, May 18
On the fifth day of 10-day special NSS camp being organised at Guru Nanak Girls College, Model Town, Ludhiana, a practical demonstration on various techniques of tie and dye and flower making was given. Jasbir Kaur and Kamalpreet Kaur, lecturers in fashion designing, were the resource persons. They imparted knowledge regarding
the preparation of fabric and dyes.

Various kinds of innovative tie and dye designs, ornamentations of tied and dyed articles through embroidery, mirror work, sequin work etc., was also demonstrated.

A mehandi competition was also held. The volunteers actively participated and exhibited their talent by different styles of mehandi (Arabic, bridal etc). The winners of the competition: Manpreet Kaur of B.Com(III) I, Genica Kanishka of B.Sc (II) and Satvir Kaur of B.Sc (III) II, Bhavpreet Kaur BSc (II) and Harmandeep Kaur BA (III) III. 

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LCET celebrates Telecommunication Day
Our Correspondent

Ludhiana, May 18
The Institution of Engineers (India), Ludhiana centre, in collaboration with the Ludhiana College of Engineering and Technology (LCET) (training and placement cell) celebrated the 39th World Telecommunication Day at the college campus. A.N Sachdeva, senior manager from Bharti Teletch Ltd, Hambran, was the chief guest and Parminder Rana, technical head, Bharti Airtel, was guest of honour and Dr J.S Sohi, LCET, Principal, presided over the function.

Dr Surindra Singh, chairman, the Institution of Engineers (India), Ludhiana centre, talked about the history of telecommunication in the world. He said telecommunication actually began in 1844 when Samuel Morse sent the first public telegraph from Washington to Baltimore. He said, “It is one of the fastest growing sectors the world over and is recognised as a key factor in the development of socio-economic, commercial and cultural activities”. They emphasised that legislations are not sufficient to contain mobile phone and cyber crimes.

World Telecommunication Day is celebrated to educate the users to use it as a facility and not abuse it.

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Designer studio
Tribune News Service

Ludhiana, May 18
Neelam's, a designer wear outlet, has opened a special designer studio in the city.

According to a press note issued yesterday the new studio would cater to customised orders in traditional wear.

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