Saturday, August 11, 2007

COLUMNS
THIS ABOVE ALL
TELEVISTA
fASHION

STAMPED IMPRESSIONS

GOOD MOTORING
AUDIO SCAN
MUSIC ZONE

PUNJABI ANTENNA

WEBSIDE HUMOUR

FOR CHILDREN

CROSSWORD
RHYME TIME

ROOTS

Who’s afraid of sex education?
The debate on making sex education mandatory in schools continues. Those against it see red at the mere mention of words like condom and arousal, while those in favour of it assert the instruction is essential to combat the risk of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. Vibha Sharma looks at the stops in the way of sex education and the new module on the subject in the offing
In a society where the word "sex" brings an embarrassed smile on most faces along with an urge to look away, the government’s and educators recent efforts to bring some forbidden words out of the closet in the form of a brand-new adolescent education programme has led to a debate on pros and cons of sex education in Indian schools.
As part of sex education, schoolgirls view exhibits in Antarang, the country’s first sex museum in Mumbai
MODEL EXPERIENCE: As part of sex education, schoolgirls view exhibits in Antarang, the country’s first sex museum in Mumbai. — Photo by Reuters

In step with rhythm
Niti Panta meets dance therapist Tripura Kashyap, who says dance can works wonders, especially for the differently abled
Did you know that dance is an ideal way to keep fit? It is a complete body workout which can burn more calories than walking, swimming or riding a bicycle besides correcting the posture. So if you want to shake your blues away and lose a few kilos then check into a dance class.

Ronnie Wood pens his life
English rock star Ronnie Wood is following in the footsteps of his band mates Sir Mick Jagger and Keith Richards by penning his autobiography. The Rolling Stones bassist is all set to spill out the secrets of 30 years with the band in Ronnie Wood: The Autobiography.

Risk of falling in love
Scientists in Britain have warned that failing in love triggers a range of physical reactions in the body that can seriously damage health. The ups and downs of romance cause a range of physical reactions like dilation of eyes, sweating of palms and increase in heart rate. It also leads to high secretion of the hormone adrenaline and that harms the body, researchers said. Martin Cowie, a professor at Imperial College in London, said that stress-related illnesses at work arose from near-identical physical phenomena, reported the online edition of Daily Mail.

 

COLUMNS

THIS ABOVE ALLCrime and punishment
by Khushwant Singh

TELEVISTAThose abrasive anchors
by Amita Malik

GOOD MOTORING: Nitrogen for tyres
by H. Kishie Singh

AUDIO SCAN: Jojo at his best

WEBSIDE HUMOUR: Timeless appeal
Compiled by Sunil Sharma

GENERATION X

CROSSWORD
by Karuna Goswamy

Rhyme Time





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