SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
M A I L B A G

SEZs are a boon for Haryana

Agriculture has been the main occupation of the people of Haryana. However, ever since its formation, every Chief Minister has encouraged industrialists and colonisers to go ahead with industries and colonies in villages around Delhi. These industrial houses have grabbed lakhs of acres for achieving their objectives. Most villages which were earmarked for vegetable cultivation during the Fourth Five-Year Plan have industrial units and colonies on their land.

Thus, the landless and marginal farmers of these villages have the poorest economy. What alternative is there for their better livelihood except employment in industries which have mushroomed all over? Gurgaon and Faridabad are clear examples. The SEZs there are obviously the legacy of the past industrial ventures.

The SEZs will boost Haryana’s economy and status as the topmost developed state. The farmers whose land will come under SEZs must come forward to support it. The creation of 10 lakh jobs will help farmers’ families. All political parties should support SEZs.


 

Industries should set up their own institutes for training the educated boys and girls, especially of the landless and marginal farmers, to become eligible for jobs. Additionally, the growing migration of rural people to the cities can be checked.

Some restrictions should be imposed on the industries in SEZs vis-à-vis the land required. A part of the profit could be shared with the locals, especially the farmers. An expert committee could review them periodically.

J.L. DALAL, Former Director, Agriculture (Haryana), Chandigarh

Speedy justice

The Chief Justice of the Himachal Pradesh High Court has rightly asked the subordinate judiciary to cut delays in the disposal of cases. To achieve this objective, the role of the prosecuting agency and the police in the criminal cases cannot be overlooked. They should be involved in this task.

I remember a former Chief Justice of the High Court, Justice T.U. Mehta, had convened a joint meeting of the magistrates and public prosecutors of the entire state to discuss issues of mutual concern of which reducing the arrears of cases was an important item. Such a practice needs to be revived.

The idea that a mechanism would be evolved soon to monitor the functioning of the subordinate judiciary is a commendable step. Since his assuming the office of the Chief Justice of the High Court, he has seen that judicial complexes are constructed for the convenience of the members of the Bar as also litigants at various places in the state. Above all, the massive building of the Himachal Pradesh High Court is a result of his keen interest and dynamism.

SOM DUTT VASUDEVA,Additional Advocate-General,Shimla (HP)

Punjab economy

Punjab’s economy is in a shambles these days. Political masters are responsible for this situation. The freebies given to farmers, injudicious use of electricity and water by them and the extra burden on the industrial sector, thus lowering industrial production, are some of the factors responsible for the malady.

Political heavyweights make promises only to protect their vote-banks. The need of the hour is to take stringent measures to end Punjab’s plight and restore its glory. The government should wake up from its slumber.

VARINDER PAL BRAR,Chandigarh


Can we protect Chandigarh’s beauty?

Following Partition, Punjab lost Lahore, its capital. Then, renowned French architect Le Corbusier designed Chandigarh as its capital with sectors, parks, roads and markets. The capital started functioning in 1953 under the Punjab government and remained so for about 12 years.

Punjab was bifurcated and new states of Haryana and Himachal Pradesh were carved out of it. The Union Territory administration spearheaded Chandigarh’s development with the cooperation of the residents and social welfare societies. Many facilities were provided to the citizens. Garbage was lifted from the houses, roads were recarpeted, parks were maintained and service lanes were cleared every year. To tackle the shortage of water and electricity, deep tube-wells were dug and a 33-KV sub-station was provided.

After the Chandigarh Municipal Corporation came into being in 1995, the city’s beauty started deteriorating due to political interference, administrative mismanagement, the influx of labourers from other states and non-cooperation of citizens and social welfare societies. Chandigarh is fast losing its beauty and becoming a polluted city.

In Canada, I have seen cities which are far more beautiful than our present Chandigarh.

BANT SINGH BHANDAIR,Chandigarh

Need of the hour

In her piece “Meeting children’s need” (Sept 4), Lakhbir Kaur Deol has suggested various measures to revamp the relationship between children and adults. The education system is based on four tiers: administration or management, teachers, children and parents. The teachers’ role in the growth of students is very important. The teachers’ relationship or behaviour towards children should be positive and friendly as a guide. The children should be treated well and not exploited. Exploitation is the root cause of all problems.

If an educational institution is unable to provide respect, love, security and discipline to the children, it must be viewed seriously and action should be taken against it. Plato said, “Do not teach children to learn by force and harshness but direct them to it by what amuses their minds so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy and peculiar bent of genius of each.”

The basic structure of a school is not the infrastructure but the children and the teachers. For, the children are the future and their guide is the teacher.

AMANDEEP KAUR KHAIRA,Khurampur (Mehatpur)

Overhaul needed

The office of the Counsel-General of India in Birmingham needs urgent attention of the government. It needs overhauling. Its employees are insensitive, and indifferent. For long periods its servicing counters remain unmanned and often persons for overseas citizenship of India are very poorly attended to. Complaints are ignored. This is unrepresentative of India, a rising world power.

Dr SATYA PRAKASH GOEL,Staffordshire (UK) 

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