SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
M A I L B A G

Corruption in Army is disturbing

It is a pity that many senior officers in the Army are indulging in corrupt practices. The juniors are left with no option but to meekly surrender before their seniors because they cannot take the risk of antagonising them keeping their career growth in mind.

Using government property, regimental and other funds for personal use is so common that no eyebrows are raised. Malpractices remain undetected in units and formation CSD canteens. Some commanding officers got into trouble for directly buying rum from certain distilleries to make huge profits.

Non-CSD canteen is another wrong practice followed in many units. Of the total yearly profit of CSD, hardly 2 per cent is used for the welfare of the Junior Commissioned Officers JCOs and others. The stores are struck with supplies and money made in these deals in several units. “Baniya” (civil canteen in units) canteen is another source of making money in many regimental canteens.

The result: while complaints against bosses get played down, the court of inquiry or other small probes are initiated against the complainants to fix them. Thus JCOs and other ranks serving under corrupt senior officers find themselves between the devil and the deep sea.

R. P. SRIVASTAVA, Chandigarh



Waiting for salary

About 7,000 computer teachers are working in Punjab’s government schools under the Punjab Information Communication Technologies Education Society (PICTES). They have not been paid salaries for the last three months. This project is a self-financing one where fees are charged from the students (Classes VI to XII) in advance in two installments - April to September; and October to March - which are regularly deposited in the account of the Director-General School Education.

The Education Minister has clearly told our delegation on October 30 that the DGSE has been directed to release the teachers’ pay, but compliance is still awaited.

SHRAVAN KUMAR YADAV, Kapurthala

Earth rotates from west to east

I read Prof Yash Pal’s article (Science Page, The Tribune, Nov 16). The writer has served the public for a long time by educating the people about scientific knowledge. The scientific field is so vast that a continuous replenishment of fresh insight is essential. It was incorrect to say that the earth’s rotation is from east to west. The rotation is from west to east and that’s why the sun rises in London later than in Delhi. The reverse rotation of Venus is explained by admitting that the axis of rotation has been deflected by about 179 degrees and the peculiar rotation of Uranus can also be understood similarly.

Most planets suffer from deflection of the axis of rotation when they get to have satellites. The theory is explained with diagrams in the book on Geophysics published in 1997 by this writer. Prof Yash Pal’s amazement about the differences in speed of rotation of various planets is also misplaced since these are quite consistent with the size and the mass of the planets. Only one has to postulate the rotation impulse per unit volume in the solar system to be the same for each planet.

Prof J.N. NANDA, Visiting Professor (Geophysics), Panjab University, Chandigarh

 


Exam for judges

I read Dr Shruti’s letter, “Exam for civil judges” (Nov 2). I would like to add one more anomaly committed by the selection committee in the recruitment of HCS (Judicial) Branch. While only 34 vacancies have been given to the committee for conducting a special recruitment, it started the process for filling 54 vacancies including 20 anticipated vacancies in terms of a Supreme Court ruling in Malik Mazhar Sultan’s case (2006).

The said judgement reiterated periodic filling of vacancies of civil judges by all state governments so that every eligible law graduate gets a chance to compete for the judiciary. It never intended to fill anticipated vacancies of civil judges along with duly advertised vacancies, thus making the near future passing out law graduates waiting for long in aspiration of appearing in state judicial exams.

I am a final year law student. If all 54 vacancies are filled, I have to wait for another two or three years or so.

ROHTASH SIHAG, (Dept of Laws, Delhi University), Rohtak

Nuclear deal

India and the US are engaged in finalising the nuclear deal. On the understanding for peaceful use, both are trying to convince their respective opposition parties. The US is giving utmost preference for India.

Now, both have understood their importance for their economic development. It is hard for India to maintain relations with the US on one side and Russia on the other. However, on the grounds of economic development, India has to go with them equally.

D. KISHAN PRASAD RAO, Secunderabad

 






Top

HOME PAGE | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Opinions |
| Business | Sports | World | Mailbag | Chandigarh | Ludhiana | Delhi |
| Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |