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The Year that was

Traverse the highs and lows of 2008 with Rajinder Puri

Images of the year

Art mart gets bigger
The Rs-15 billion domestic art market is pegged to grow around 35 per cent annually, writes Soudhriti Bhabani
T
HE Indian art scenario this year has been through both good and bad. Great demand, great works, but on the other side, darker forces trying to mar artistic creativity.

Saas bahu soaps lose TRP race
Amar Nath Wadehra and Randeep Wadehra look at the trends that dominated
the small screen in 2008
F
ROM just one channel in 1991 to over 300 channels (with more than a hundred 24X7 news channels) today the television in India has come a long way from being an instrument of the state for forging a uniform thought process throughout the country to be a multi-dimensional platform for eclectic infotainment.

Return of the plot
THE year 2008 also saw the TV entertainment scenario getting over its self-imposed inertness. Advent of the Colors television channel has heralded the dawn of serials with original plots.

Small budget big hits
As recession sweeps across the globe, several low-budget, non-star productions are being green-lighted, most of them with first-time directors, writes Derek Bose
A
S the year draws to a close, some clarity is beginning to emerge on what the future holds for Bollywood. For one, directors, rather than stars, would determine the fate of films at the box-office. For another, the role of heroines is getting minimised.

A million dreams
Even before its release in India, Danny Boyleís Slumdog Millionaire, the story of Jamal, an underdog from the slums of Mumbai who becomes a millionaire, has won accolades at many a film festival, writes Ranjita Biswas
Living in a slum and earning millions? Whom are you kidding? Well, if itís a plucky kid like orphan Jamal who grows up in abject poverty in the slums, but still makes a million, you have to believe it. Because thatís how typical rags to riches stories are churned out by Bollywood with the mandatory happy ending with the ladylove in tow.

COLUMNS

CONSUMER RIGHTS: Tough year for the common man
by Pushpa Girimaji

BRIDGE
by David Bird

ULTA PULTA: Shoe time
by Jaspal Bhatti

BOOKS

FICTION
The wondrous world of words
Rupa Bajwa
Working on a new novel has taken me down unfamiliar, new paths this year and I didnít get to read as much in 2008 as I would have liked to. While I am wary of indulging in any critical analysis right now, here are reminisces of some of the reading I did this year, and my personal response to it.

NON-FICTION
India comes to the fore
M. Rajivlochan
OF all the books released in 2008, the singular best-seller in 2009 would be Nandan Nilekaniís Imagining India: Ideas for a New Century (Allen Lane) on what India should do in order to move forward in the present century.

Real lives on bookshelves
Harbans Singh
AS the year comes to an end and one recalls the biographical books that made an impact, one cannot miss the contrast between L. K. Advaniís My Country, My Life (Rupa & Co) and Barack Obamaís The Audacity of Hope (Canongate).

Netting numbers
Roopinder Singh
BOOKS by young non-professional writers are selling in numbers too big to ignore. They might have a tough time with critics, and established authors may have issues in making space for these writers among their ranks.

Take a chill pill with chick lit
Aruti Nayar
ITíS crazy, itís zany, and, of course, itís chic...what is more, itís spinning an entire generation of yuppies into a tizzy.

Eye-catchers
Boyd Tonkin and Katy Guest select some of the outstanding titles of 2008

International Bestsellers





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