SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
L E T T E R S    T O    T H E    E D I T O R

India always on the defensive

Right from the day we became an independent nation, our track record in preserving our integrity has only been in defending ourselves rather than taking any pre-emptive action against our hostile neighbours. We have seen many wars, but only the 1971 war with Pakistan can be termed as pre-emptive. We miserably failed in 1948 and 1962, entailing a loss of territories to the enemies. The others when we won we were not able to capitalise upon our army’s achievements.

While preparing for a competitive examination, the subject of our mock group discussion was national integrity and non-violence. We concluded to our dismay that we as a nation are good only in defending ourselves. The second conclusion was that non-violence was good as a way of life but not as an ingredient of statecraft.

Today’s youth, who will be at the helm tomorrow, certainly find themselves at the crossroads.

NEENA SHARMA, Sundernagar




Punish the guilty

The cold-blooded murder of PWD engineer MK Gupta, who said no to donations for UP Chief Minister Mayawati’s birthday bash, is shocking. It will be more shocking if the guilty are not brought to book. The U.P. police should ensure that the guilty are punished according to the law of the land. The police should not forget that policemen can also fall a victim to political violence.

The UP engineers association should continue its struggle till justice is meted out. The politicians who shelter the guilty should not be voted to power. The media has a special role to play whenever and wherever such acts are committed. Criminals-turned-politicians are a virulent threat to democracy. One wonders why they are not punished. Their cases linger on for years. This encourages the guilty politicians to commit more crimes. The UP Chief Minister’s refusal for a CBI probe speaks volumes about her insensitivity

GURBACHAN SINGH, Patiala

Unfair to Leftists

In the editorial “Reforms in Insurance” (Dec 24), the word monkey has been used for leftists. It is an outright insult to responsible persons who endorse Marx’s ideology.

The Leftists are watching the interests of the working classes and the country. Their warning that an increase in foreign direct investment from 26 per cent to 49 per cent in the insurance sector is risky is most logical, more so when the world is facing economic depression .In this context, the use of the word “monkey” for these sane people is not proper.

PROF O P VERMA, Malerkotla

Security fixation

The editorial “Security mania” (Dec 19) effectively highlighted the present-day scenario when the nation’s hard-earned money is unnecessarily being wasted on VIP security. The same money can be saved and spent on constructive works meant for the poor and the downtrodden.

The politicians who really consider themselves patriotic must reduce their security cover so that a large number of cops deployed with them are used for the security of the common people. The government should initiate an exercise to re-evaluate threat perception and provide minimum security to VIPs, especially politicians.

JAGAT RAM, Shimla

Peace emissaries

Eminent personalities of the country, the noted sports legend “Flying Sikh” Milkha Singh, who is held in high esteem among the people of Pakistan, and former supercop Kiran Bedi, a Magasaysay award winner, should be deputed to have peace dialogue with Pakistan. The people of both countries want peace, as war will bring havoc and finish both forever.

NARINDER SINGH, Chandigarh





Police must be people-friendly

In the article “Getting the fundamentals right” (Dec 23), B. G. Verghese has very appropriately observed that the criminalisation of politics and politicisation of crime have gone hand in hand over the years lubricated by corruption. In the context of the menace of terrorism looming large over the national horizon, he hits the nail on the head when he asserts that good policing is a must for getting the fundamentals right.

Sadly, in the eyes of people, the police is a pliable tool in the hands of the political classes and it is enmeshed in the cesspool of corruption. The people feel not only alienated from the police but also antagonistic towards it.

The police has to be equipped with top class weapons. Unless the police is made people-friendly and corruption is rooted out, there is little hope of fighting out terrorism.

In my view, a few regional commando hubs cannot meet the cascading menace of terrorism. Until the fundamentals of the polity and governance are set right, ensuring total transparency and accountability at all levels, we can’t hope to be terror-free.

DR PREM SINGH DAHIYA, Rohtak

 





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