SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
L E T T E R S    T O    T H E    E D I T O R

Pakistan’s admission is India’s victory

The belated and reluctant admission by Pakistan that the Mumbai terror attack was planned and executed by elements in Pakistan comes as a great moral and political victory for India. It is also a major success for India’s foreign policy. Only a few hours before the admission, Pakistan was in denial mode. Reportedly, a call from the US President, Mr Barack Obama, carried the day for India.

This proves that the world has at last come to believe and realise that Pakistan is the hub of international terror. Despite this admission by Pakistan, there is a long way to go before the culprits of the horrendous attack are brought to book. Therefore, India should continue to exert pressure on the world at all international platforms to ensure that such attacks do not recur. Plus, the perpetrators of the heinous crime must be given exemplary punishment.

DR M K BAJAJ, Zirakpur




Testing times

Despite repeated provocations by Pakistan, culminating in the Mumbai terror attack, we have emerged more united and stronger (HK Dua’s front-page editorial “Sharp turns: Troubled times lie ahead”, Feb 9). We are managing the onslaught of recession quite well. Besides, our diplomatic offensive is working well.

Of course, the verdict of the electorate could become a serious concern. But then the working of the NDA government at the Centre under former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and the UPA government under Dr Manmohan Singh has been satisfactory. One made India a nuclear weapon state and the later signed the landmark Indo-US nuclear deal. Our potential to govern well remains intact. Let us hope the Indian electorate rises to the occasion and exercises its franchise keeping in view the national interest. The media, too, can play a positive role.

SHANTI SWARUP SHARMA, Dharamshala

II

Mr Dua’s views are absolutely right. At this crucial juncture, the world’s largest democracy may have to face an uphill task in the near future. The unfortunate episode of 26/11 and the worldwide economic meltdown are really playing havoc.

The forthcoming Lok Sabha elections also do not promise a rosy picture for the nation. The two major political parties, the Congress and the BJP, do not possess Alladin’s lamp with which they can woo voters in their favour. The regional parties may be able to form the government, but they would never be able to deliver.

MANOJ VINAY KUMAR, Nakodar

III

Mr Dua has rightly analysed the forthcoming political events. He has given a timely warning to the national and secular forces.

Earlier the Central leadership used to appoint Chief Ministers of states and this time it appears that immature regional party heads will appoint the Prime Minister of India. It is high time the national parties like the Congress, the BJP and the CPM, in particular, act in the interest of the nation and help form a stable government.

PREM SINGH SANDHU, DR. R K NARAD, Gurdaspur

IV

It has been rightly concluded, “No one knows which way the voters’ mind will work at the polls”. The fact is that voters themselves are a confused lot. They are divided on narrow considerations of caste, region and language, and have little feeling of nationalism left in them.

ANAND PRAKASH, Panchkula

Job crunch

Indeed, it is a matter of grave concern that five lakh jobs have been lost in the three months between October and December 2008 and the GDP has come down considerably. Even more shocking is the assessment that by the end of this fiscal year about 40 lakh people will lose their jobs.

You have aptly pointed out in your editorial Vanishing jobs (Feb 7) that in lieu of forthcoming Lok Sabha elections, the UPA government will be announcing a stimulus package and tax breaks. The measures may boost sagging growth, create jobs and increase exports.

SHUBASH C TANEJA, Rohtak

Change the mindset

I agree with the views expressed in the editorial, Medieval mindset (Feb 5). In the name of family honour, precious lives of young men and women are lost. The argument that the medieval mindset of the common people should change is rational. The prevalent mindset impinges upon the democratic right of the youth to choose their life-partners. Their family members and caste panchayats can oppose such alliances without resorting to violence if they so desire. But under no circumstances should parents even think of taking away the lives of their own children.

We are still nursing a medieval mindset and political leaders maintain a tacit silence on such sensitive social issues. Despite the annoying indifference of politicians, the sane elements in society should oppose such honour killings. No one should be allowed to take the law into one’s own hands.

RAJ BAHADUR YADAV, Fatehabad






Ban loudspeakers

We students need to study at least for about four hours everyday. Due to the various factors, we get time to study only late at night or in the early morning. But owing to indiscriminate use of loudspeakers during wedding parties and at religious places, we are not able to study.

If we want Punjab as also other states to be developed ones, let us study for as long as we can. It is a humble request to ban or curtail the use of loudspeakers at night and during early morning hours.

ANSHUL BAWA , Patiala

 





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