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THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE
TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
L E T T E R S    T O    T H E    E D I T O R

Varun can’t be let off the hook

The editorial Prosecute Varun Gandhi(March 24) has aptly taken the BJP to task for not following the advice of the Election Commission. The BJP is well aware that Varun Gandhi’s diatribe at an election rally was nothing but minority bashing which could have led to social unrest. Obviously, Varun was playing to the gallery to garner votes by targeting the largest minority in the country. His denial that the CD containing the footage of his speech is tampered does not seem convincing.

The BJP’s soft pedalling on Varun’s inflammatory harangue perhaps indicates its endorsement of dividing people along caste, region and religion lines for electoral gains. This policy is striking at the roots of the pluralist Indian polity. No party should, therefore, condone irresponsible behaviour of its leaders. The communal harmony and peace in the society has to be given utmost priority.

Anyhow, in view of the BJP’s refusal to cancel Varun’s nomination, proceedings against Varun should be started immediately. He should be barred from fighting elections.

SATWANT KAUR, Mahilpur, Hoshiarpur




II

I strongly feel that provocative statements against minority community by Varun Gandhi and the BJP supporting Varun’s candidature, thus rejecting the Election Commission’s advice, has damaged the BJP’s image as a democratic mainstream party. In recent past, the BJP’s association with Pragya Singh Thakur embarrassed it considerably. First it distanced itself from her and was then compelled to come out in her support which really exposed the extremist facet of the BJP and the hidden communal agenda of the Sangh Parivar.

Our political parties need to wake up to the fact that unless candidates like Varun Gandhi are stopped in their tracks, India would surely face communal unrest and violence.

DR VITULL K GUPTA, Bathinda

III

The hidden agenda of the BJP has been totally exposed. Whether its Hindutava card will serve as a blessing or a curse will be seen in the forthcoming Lok Sabha elections.

OMAR LUTHER KING, New Delhi

Educating voters

The Tribune campaign “Your Vote Matters” beseeched voters not to vote for those who have grown rich in politics.

I draw your attention to the fact that perhaps today there are a handful of politicians who are not corrupt. The few exceptions could be men like Dr Manmohan Singh. Then there are fools like me who have lost their health, wealth and energy in this dirty game. Kindly accept the reality and advise the readers to vote for the less corrupt candidate. Besides, the politicians in power have made elections so costly that the common man cannot dream of contesting polls.

HARMOHINDER SINGH GROVER, Abohar

Campaign with dignity

It is disturbing that standards of politics and political debate have deteriorated considerably in the run-up to the Lok Sabha polls. There is an urgent need to elevate the country’s politics to Gandhian standards, where the political opponents would argue but would not try to defame each other.

The election campaign should be conducted with dignity and under no circumstances should one use offensive language against others. The political leaders should try to bring down the political temperature in the country through mutual goodwill.

N S VENKATARAMAN, Chennai







GM food: allay the fears

The article, Move to allay fears over GM food (March 19) by Andrew Grice is enlightening information for the scientific community. The progressive step taken by the British Government to sanction a major research project can provide a clean chit to the controversial genetically modified crops. There has been a lot of debate on whether the GM crops are safe or not.

The anti-GM crop brigade has always warned people against its use. There have been numerous reports in The Tribune over the issue but the basic query is still unanswered. Are GM crops safe or not?

The Indian government should also make a panel of experts and chalk out a well-considered plan to check open field trials of GM crops. The government should encourage scientists to conduct a feasibility survey of GM crops and compare it to the conventional varieties. The issue should remain away from politicians and be guided by the scientific community only.

DR KAMALJEET KAUR SEKHON,

Thapar University, Patiala

 





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