SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
L E T T E R S    T O    T H E    E D I T O R

Corruption, tax evasion not in focus

H K Dua in his front-page Editors Column “Vital issues that politicians hate to take up” (April 23) has rightly indicted the degenerate political system. About politicians, he has stated, “Because they do not want to face inconvenient truth?” But then who cares for truthfulness?

Political parties are not at all interested in truth. They do not have people’s interest in mind. Corruption, bribery and tax evasion are rampant. No party has any concrete plans on how to eradicate these evils. The onus is now on voters who must cast their vote in favour of honest sincere, educated and law-abiding candidates.

KHAZAN SINGH, Kapurthala




II

Mr Dua has critically focused on the dismal political scenario. Political parties and their leaders are out to garner votes through fair and foul means. They are indulging in unnecessary blame game . There is no sign of morality, character or public decorum. Yet it is these unethical leaders who wish to enter the august portals of Parliament.

Criminals and smugglers have been given party tickets. Cash is being openly distributed. Can we expect good governance from them? Both national parties have been involved in communal riots. Let the voters judge their worthiness in the ensuing elections.

GURDEV SINGH, SAS Nagar

Retirement age

Ever since Mr Sukhbir Badal took to active politics, youth welfare and development have been his priority. Ironically, he also happens to be the first one to publicly announce that his government would accept Pay Commission recommendations and implement the same. Interestingly, one of the recommendations of the commission is the proposal to increase the retirement age of employees. This will not go down well with the youth of the state as a majority of youngsters aspire to have a secure government job.

Now, the onus lies with the government which has to take a final decision whether to implement this contentious decision or not. It remains to be seen how Punjab’s Deputy Chief Minister will tackle the situation? He will have to choose between the “lobby of officers” and lakhs of youngsters seeking employment.

DR SANJAY BHAGAT, Fatehgarh Sahib

II

The Punjab government should not increase the retirement age of its employees, as it would adversely affect unemployed youth. The economic recession has already affected their chances of securing a job. The government is duty bound to evolve mechanisms for providing employment to its people, especially at the time of a financial crisis.

Steps like increasing the retirement age would worsen the crisis further and youth may feel cheated. People who retire get many benefits like pension and can make both ends meet.

However, unemployment can push youth towards crime and drug addiction. It is the foremost duty of the government to provide employment opportunities to the youth. Let us hope that Punjab government reconsiders its proposal of increasing the retirement age of employees.

DEEPA DIXIT, Rajpura

Power of prayer

The middle “Prayer as a therapy” (April 24) by Bhartendu Sood came as a shot in the arm of many a troubled soul who fall prey to fortunetellers, tantriks and tricksters in their moments of distress.

They must realise that life is full of surprises, both sweet and sour. After every sunset, the sun rises again. Patience and determination are key factors in fighting against odds.

People must have faith in the Almighty and remember “Dukh vele ardas, Sukh vele shukrana and har vele simran” (Pray when in distress, be grateful in comfort and remember god all the time). It is aptly mentioned that it is the prayer that gives strength and shows the way. Remember, “God helps those who help themselves.” A prayer is akin to a booster dose.

HARBANS SINGH, Ambala Cantt





Control illegal outflow of funds

The Indian economy is the fastest growing economy in the world. The expertise of our professionals, the confidence of industries and demographic advantages go in our favour. But if we have to sustain our development, our political process must guarantee corruption-free administration.

A US-based organisation, Global Financial Integrity, made a startling revelation that corrupt Indians are causing a huge illicit outflow of funds annually to foreign banks through clandestine channels. Corruption not only undermines Indian investment and economic growth, but also diminishes the legitimacy of the state.

Corruption cannot be checked unless prompt action is taken to investigate allegations and to book the guilty. India requires special anti-corruption courts to take speedy action against corrupt officials. An interesting approach given by the World Bank states that successful governance improvement and anti-corruption programmes are a direct function of public availability of knowledge and information plus political leadership and collective action.

MAJ MATHEW OOMMEN (retd), Pune

 





Top


HOME PAGE | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Opinions |
| Business | Sports | World | Letters | Chandigarh | Ludhiana | Delhi |
| Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |