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Winners all the way
Junior boxers savour board success after WC medals
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TíS twin celebration time for eight 16-year-old junior boxers, who managed Indiaís best-ever medal haul of four at the AIBA World Championships, as they have also cleared their Board exams, for them more frightening than exchanging blows.

Englandís secret weapon
Coloured sunglasses will be the England cricket teamís secret weapon this summer. Cricketers have been advised on how they can optimise their vision by wearing the right-coloured lenses from a selection of yellow, red, gold, silver and orange for different conditions, reports The Daily Telegraph.

Soderling on
Bjorn Borg says swede can beat anyone
Former Swedish tennis great Bjorn Borg has hailed compatriot Robin Soderlingís upset against defending French Open champion Rafael Nadal. "If you can defeat Nadal on clay in Paris, you can beat anyone," Borg was quoted as telling the Expressen daily.
Defending French Open champions Rafael Nadal and Serbiaís Ana Ivanovic were defeated by Swedenís Robin Soderling and Belarusí Victoria Azarenka, respectively
Defending French Open champions Rafael Nadal and Serbiaís Ana Ivanovic were defeated by Swedenís Robin Soderling and Belarusí Victoria Azarenka, respectively
CRASH OF THE TITANS
Former world number one sixth seed US player Andy Roddick lost to French player Gael Monfil at Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Third seed Venus Williams of US lost to Hungaryís Agnes Szavay in a third round match last week Photos: AFP
Former world number one sixth seed US player Andy Roddick lost to French player Gael Monfil at Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Third seed Venus Williams of US lost to Hungaryís Agnes Szavay in a third round match last week Photos: AFP





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Winners all the way
Junior boxers savour board success after WC medals

Shiva Thapa from Guwahati won a bronze medal in the World Championship and also cleared his board exams
Shiva Thapa from Guwahati won a bronze medal in the World Championship and also cleared his board exams

ITíS twin celebration time for eight 16-year-old junior boxers, who managed Indiaís best-ever medal haul of four at the AIBA World Championships, as they have also cleared their Board exams, for them more frightening than exchanging blows.

The eight-member team, of which Sandeep Singh (46 kg) won a silver and Shiva Thapa (52 kg), Namit Bahadur (50 kg) and Vikas Khatri (54 kg) clinched bronze medals, returned to the country earlier this week.

The team also had Mandeep Jangra (60 kg), Kuldeep (57 kg) and Sumit Sangwan (70 kg), who bowed out by the quarterfinal stage.

"Itís a huge relief to have passed out. Itís near impossible to manage your studies when you have to spend so much time in the ring," said Sandeep, who comes from Bhiwani, a place widely considered the cradle of Indian boxing after the Beijing Olympics.

"I am going home for a few days to celebrate with my parents. I think I will be seeing them after more than three months. Itís such a relief... I am glad to have got through," said Guwahatiís Shiva, who will head to the Army Sports Institute, Pune, after the brief break to resume training for the Asian Junior Championships in September.

The other two bronze medallists, Vikas and Namit, were also heaving a sigh of relief at clearing their board exams after spending a better part of their year inside the ring training in Hisar.

"We spend so much time practising that there is hardly any time for studying so it is relieving that we have got through," said Vikas.

"I will be rushing to get admission in a college."

Education is important, it canít be ignored but yes boxing is first love," added Mandeep, a protege of World Cup bronze medallist Akhil Kumar. India finished an impressive seventh in the championship, while Cuba came third with five medals (two gold, a silver and two bronze) in the event that concluded on May 30 in Yerevan, Armenia. Except for Shiva, who was a gold medallist at last yearís Hyder Aliyev Cup, the entire bunch comprised rookies making their maiden appearance at an international tournament of such repute.

"No doubt it was a wonderful experience but then we couldnít have allowed this to overwhelm us. The Russians, the Cubans, they were all there but it was thrilling not intimidating," recounted Sandeep.

"Frankly, we were surprised at how ordinary the Cubans are. They are too defensive, they hardly ever lower their guard, they donít make many attempts at hitting you. I didnít find them as impressive as they are made out to be. Nothing special about them," Sandeep says.The rest of his teammates agree.

"Itís difficult to get them to lower their guard but otherwise, they do nothing extraordinary," said Vikas.

"The Russians, who won nine medals, were far more impressive. The Cubans ... not as good as we were told they would be," added Shiva. ó PTI
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Englandís secret weapon

England cricketer Tim Bresnan looks in a mirror as he tries on a pair of sunglasses during a team practice session at Lords in London
England cricketer Tim Bresnan looks in a mirror as he tries on a pair of sunglasses during a team practice session at Lords in London. English players have been asked to wear different coloured lenses to see what improvement they made to their performance

Coloured sunglasses will be the England cricket teamís secret weapon this summer.

Cricketers have been advised on how they can optimise their vision by wearing the right-coloured lenses from a selection of yellow, red, gold, silver and orange for different conditions, reports The Daily Telegraph.

The daily reported that optometrists and sports scientists at the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) have been conducting tests to find the best way to combat the glaring sunshine that can impede playersí vision while attempting crucial catches.

The researchers found that with the right kind of glasses, cricketers can improve their vision to spot the ball by up to 28 per cent compared to wearing no sunglasses.

Players have now been told how to optimise their vision by wearing the right-coloured lenses for the conditions from a selection of yellow, red, gold, silver and orange.

Orange lenses were found to be better for players at dusk, particularly when playing with a white ball rather than the traditional red ball.

Nick Dash, an optometrist at Loughborough University and an expert in sports vision, conducted the research in a series of tests with the England Lions team in India.

Players, including bowler Monty Panesar, were asked to wear different coloured lenses to see what improvement they made to their performance. They were also put through their paces by fielding machines under a range of different lighting conditions.

Sports equipment major Adidas is expected to supply new eyewear for the team to help them in their summer matches.

Former England captain Michael Vaughan said he regularly wears black-tinted sunglasses to help him pick out the ball in bright conditions.

"I wear black iridium sunglasses. I used to wear them when it was windy to help keep the wind out of my eyes. When it was sunny or slightly bright it would help reduce the glare. With the amount of time we spend outside, a lot of the players find it helps relax our eyes if we are wearing sunglasses and it can help you pick the ball up quicker," he said. ó IANS
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Soderling on
Bjorn Borg says swede can beat anyone

Bjorn BorgFormer Swedish tennis great Bjorn Borg has hailed compatriot Robin Soderlingís upset against defending French Open champion Rafael Nadal.

"If you can defeat Nadal on clay in Paris, you can beat anyone," Borg was quoted as telling the Expressen daily.

Borg, a six-time winner at Roland Garros, said he hoped "the Swedish people really comprehend what an achievement it was." "It is really a feat," Borg added.

Borg said he believed Soderling could become a top-10 player and the win against the world Number 1 had given him the necessary edge.

The former champion Borg said he was due to visit Paris with his wife Patricia and hoped to boost Soderling.

And as Swedish tennis has slumped in recent years, Soderlingís win might contribute to reviving interest in the sport.

"This is what Swedish tennis needs. There has rightly been a lot of complaints and moaning, but this is just what was needed, Borg said, adding he didnít rule out Soderling as winning the classic Grand Slam event. ó DPA

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