SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI
O P I N I O N S

Editorials | Article | Middle | Oped

EDITORIALS

Avoidable crisis in J & K
PDP out to create instability
T
HE action of PDP leader Mehbooba Mufti in the Jammu and Kashmir Assembly in wrenching the mike out of the Speaker’s podium and throwing it away in a show of defiance and anger was reprehensible. 

Nurturing growth
RBI, FM make all efforts
T
HE RBI’s rate-cutting spree that began with the global financial crisis seems to have ended. The apex bank left the key rates unchanged in its monetary policy review on Tuesday. 


EARLIER STORIES

Kargil to Arihant
July 28, 2009
Modi not above law
July 27, 2009
Redefining education
July 26, 2009
Who rules Haryana?
July 25, 2009
Musharraf in the dock
July 24, 2009
A disgraceful act
July 23, 2009
Better than expected
July 22, 2009
Two years for killing six!
July 21, 2009
Sharif’s triumph
July 20, 2009
Bringing out the best
July 19, 2009
No to wheat exports
July 18, 2009


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE
TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS


Terror trio
Their punishment must serve as a deterrent
T
HE long arms of justice have caught up with the Mumbai couple and the zari worker who have been convicted for the twin bomb blasts in the country’s commercial capital on August 25, 2003. 
ARTICLE

Justice, ego and arrogance
How class comes into the picture
by B.G. Verghese
T
EN years ago, six persons, including three policemen, were run over in Delhi by a speeding BMW with an inebriated young man at the wheel. The Delhi High Court has now commuted the trial court’s sentence of the offender, Sanjeev Nanda, from five years to two, all but a month of which has already been served as an under-trial. The justification for the revised sentence was that the event, though a result of rash and negligent driving, was not wilfully caused with the intent to kill but was truly an accident for which the maximum penalty, as finally awarded, is two years imprisonment.

MIDDLE

A couple’s dream
by Jupinderjit Singh

Journalist couples, especially those working as reporters, must be sharing a dream, my wife and I always talked about. How it would look like if we saw our bylines on the same day on page one in our paper --- The Tribune?

OPED

Education Policy — A Tribune Debate 
Improve teaching in rural schools
by Gurbax Singh Shergill
T
HE HRD Minister seems to be more concerned about problems of the urban elite than the conditions of rural and backward poor students. The urban elite students study in public schools, paying hefty fees. They attend coaching classes. They are under heavy pressure mainly because of their parents’ high expectations and the system of CAT and PMET for admissions to top institutes.

Continuous evaluation is a better option
by B.S. Ghuman

Building a knowledge society
by Rup Narayan Das

Grades better than marks
by S. Sapru

When tempers fly: How to avoid air rage
by Simon Calder
C
HEAP plane tickets have a nasty habit of becoming expensive. Three years ago I booked a bargain trip from Belfast City to Stansted with Europe's third-largest budget airline, Air Berlin. We passengers all turned up at the airport on time, knowing that even a minute's tardiness is enough to see you offloaded. But a flight that began with an hour's delay was, later in the evening, cancelled. Apparently the plane that was supposed to operate was redeployed to replace a broken aircraft elsewhere on the network.

Corrections and clarifications



Top



















 

Avoidable crisis in J & K
PDP out to create instability

THE action of PDP leader Mehbooba Mufti in the Jammu and Kashmir Assembly in wrenching the mike out of the Speaker’s podium and throwing it away in a show of defiance and anger was reprehensible. That the PDP did not stop at that and one of its senior leaders, Mr Muzaffar Hussain Baig, the very next day linked Chief Minister Omar Abdullah to the infamous sex scandal that had rocked Srinagar in 2006 is a pointer that the real purpose was to disrupt the assembly proceedings, seek to embarrass the Chief Minister and precipitate a political crisis. After her defeat in the last assembly elections, Mehbooba has given indications that she has joined hands with separatists. Her rabble-rousing has increased and her statements have often been provocative and intemperate. She has been seeking to make political capital out of the unfortunate rape and murder of two young girls in Shopian instead of working to restore peace and calm.

Recently, Mr Omar Abdullah had pointed to the appalling double standards of the PDP and the separatists in maintaining silence on the killings of a three-year-old boy and his father by Hizbul Mujahideen militants and the brutal killings of two women — 17-year-old Nigeen Awan and 45-year-old Rashma Jan — by the Hizb militants, while they breathed fire on the rape and killing of the two Shopian girls. One wonders whether the pandemonium in the assembly and the subsequent salvos fired at Omar were intended to force him to quit. That a stickler for propriety that Omar is, he went to Governor Vohra and handed over his resignation to him soon after he was slandered in the assembly is unfortunate indeed.

It is time the PDP leader’s bluff be called. She must be duly punished for consciously working along with anti-national forces to destabilise the elected government of the day and to keep the pot in Kashmir boiling. As for Omar Abdullah, he must be given a chance to prove his innocence speedily so that the affairs of the state go on without impediment. The Governor will be well advised in the interest of political stability to reject the resignation of the Chief Minister which was given in an emotional response to the wild charges made by Mr Baig. This is so particularly when the CBI and the Home Minister have said that Omar’s name is not there in any of the charge-sheets filed in the sex scandal. This will be the best way to resolve the crisis which was sought to be created by the PDP.

Top

 

Nurturing growth
RBI, FM make all efforts

THE RBI’s rate-cutting spree that began with the global financial crisis seems to have ended. The apex bank left the key rates unchanged in its monetary policy review on Tuesday. Since October last year the RBI had taken measures to lower interest rates and increase liquidity in the system. The government has announced three stimulus packages to revive consumer demand, boost housing and prop up falling industrial production. The 2009-10 Union Budget proposed to leave more money in the hands of rural consumers. On Monday Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee gave another push to the economy by providing 1 per cent interest subsidy for lower and middle-income housing loans and tax relief to industrial parks and food processing units.

The RBI and government efforts have yielded results. There is a clear turnaround in the economy. Corporate earnings have picked up, though manufacturing and exports are still sluggish. While the RBI has raised the GDP growth rate to 6 per cent this fiscal, the erratic behaviour of the monsoon can upset its calculations. Deficient rains, which are likely in the North-West region, can affect growth as well as push up prices of essential commodities. No wonder, the RBI has predicted the hardening of inflation to 5 per cent, which could be also due to other factors like the recent oil price hike, heavy government borrowings and expansionary monetary policy of the RBI.

A major worry for the RBI as well as economic analysts is India’s fiscal deficit, which at 6.8 per cent of the GDP has been the highest in 16 years. The apex bank has rightly warned: “Large fiscal deficit, if continued strictly beyond the recovery period, can crowd out private investment and trigger inflationary pressures”. The government is set to borrow a record 4.51 trillion rupees to fund its stimulus packages, loan waiver and pro-poor schemes. It is banking heavily on economic recovery, which, it hopes, would increase its tax revenue.

Top

 

Terror trio
Their punishment must serve as a deterrent

THE long arms of justice have caught up with the Mumbai couple and the zari worker who have been convicted for the twin bomb blasts in the country’s commercial capital on August 25, 2003. Their heinous acts led to the killing of 52 people and injuries to many more, yet the main killer, Hanif Syed, was shamelessly smiling when the special court, set up under the Prevention of Terrorism Act, pronounced the keenly awaited judgement on Monday. Interestingly, it is for the first time that a man-wife duo (Hanif and Fehmeeda Syed) has been convicted for being involved in acts of terrorism. The woman was found as much active in making and planting bombs as was her husband and the third convict, Ishrat Ansari.

The quantum of punishment, to be declared on August 4, will be either imprisonment for life or death sentence, as the law provides for either. Anyone indulging in acts of terror must be given the harshest punishment possible. No leniency need be shown so that others think twice before causing death and destruction in the manner the three convicts did at Mumbai’s Gateway of India and Zaveri Bazar on that black Monday.

This is the second biggest terrorism-related case in which conviction has been possible. The first case dealt with the 1993 serial bomb blasts in which 100 people were pronounced guilty in 2007. Six years ago, on August 25, Hanif Syed, his wife Fehmeeda Syed and Ishrat Ansari committed the crime at the bidding of their Lashkar-e-Toiba handlers in Pakistan, as they admitted, on the pretext of avenging the killings in the 2002 post-Godhra riots in Gujarat. They deserved what they have got, as an act of terrorism can never be justified, whatever the reason for it. 

Top

 

Thought for the Day

You think you are dying for your country; you die for the industrialists. 
— Anatole France

Top

 

Justice, ego and arrogance
How class comes into the picture
by B.G. Verghese

TEN years ago, six persons, including three policemen, were run over in Delhi by a speeding BMW with an inebriated young man at the wheel. The Delhi High Court has now commuted the trial court’s sentence of the offender, Sanjeev Nanda, from five years to two, all but a month of which has already been served as an under-trial. The justification for the revised sentence was that the event, though a result of rash and negligent driving, was not wilfully caused with the intent to kill but was truly an accident for which the maximum penalty, as finally awarded, is two years imprisonment.

So far, so good. That is the law. But is that justice? Other than the fact of an accident through rash and negligent driving there were certain other attendant circumstances. After the accident, Nanda and his companions did not report to the police or carry the injured/dead to the hospital. Instead, they drove off to the Nanda residence and garaged and thereafter cleaned the car of bloodstains. The attempt to obliterate any trace of guilt proved unavailing as there was a tell-tale oil trial from the accident site to the garage. At some point in the trial proceedings, an effort was made to suggest that the vehicle in question was not the BMW but a truck!

At yet another point, a news channel exposed collusion between Nanda’s counsel, R.K. Anand, and the prosecutor, I.U. Khan, to subvert the trial. A year later, the High Court held both Anand and Khan guilty of contempt and barred them from appearing in court for four months. On whose behalf did Anand act if not that of his client? These events add a moral dimension to the case through the attempt to evade the law and subvert due process. The High Court judge did take cognizance of these facts in awarding the maximum punishment permissible under the law. Yet, Nanda’s case was not improved by the statement by his counsel that he deserved leniency because the family had paid Rs 65 lakh as compensation to the accident victims and that he himself had suffered the trauma of 10 years of incarceration as an under-trial.

What of the agony of the victims’ kith and kin who had to wait for 10 long years for closure against a guilty but powerful and well-connected accused? The Nanda case merits a closer systemic look as this is not the first time that well-heeled offenders have violated the law and then sought to pull their rank and wealth to try and get away, buy witnesses and seek leniency while the lowly are often treated with indignity and pushed to the wall unheard by society. Maybe, the answer to moral as against legal guilt might lie in an amendment to the law that permits courts to award “moral punishment” in appropriate cases in the form of a year or two of approved social service among the downtrodden as determined by the court before such persons gain final absolution.

Egos and arrogance take many forms but in all of these “class” comes into the picture. Everyone but Dr Abdul Kalam seems to have been outraged because the former President was frisked and unshod on the aero-bridge by the Continental Airlines security staff in Delhi before boarding a flight to the US as required under American law. The incident took place in April and a public ruckus and threats of legal action against Continental Airlines could have been avoided by quiet bilateral diplomacy to ensure avoidance of or strict reciprocity in such cases on the basis of agreed protocols.

Then, MPs of all hues were up in arms when the government said it wished to downgrade NSG security to certain former ministers. At a time when the country has insufficient policemen to combat crime in the cities and fight the Naxalite menace, it is absurd to have to tie down dozens upon dozens of the highest trained security personnel to guard ever longer lists of former ministers and others on grounds of “threats” to their lives.

These security norms and baubles like red and blue car-top beacons and shrieking sirens must be reviewed as they have largely become status symbols for vainglorious politicians. More recently an MP tried to break the Prime Minister’s motorcade security while he was proceeding to Parliament on the ground that he had as much right to reach Parliament on time as anybody else. Some MPs have extended this VIP principle to delaying flights which they board after the departure time.

And then the Andhra MP who slapped a rural bank manager for not giving out Dalit loans as he desired.

In the midst of all these ego-trips one must welcome a judgement of the Andhra High Court staying a state government order providing financial assistance to Christians desirous of going on pilgrimage to Bethlehem, Jerusalem and Nazareth. The proposal was a clear case of communal vote banking and an abuse of public funds on a par with the increasing subsidies being given to Haj pilgrims and those undertaking the yatra to Kailash-Mansarovar. It is time the UPA put an end to such flagrant competitive communalism that goes against the Constitution and the commitment to secularism. Provide facilities within reason, yes. Subsidies — essentially the buying of community votes — no.

Finally, the country needs to come down heavily on such unacceptable traditions as neck-deep burial of children to cure their disabilities during total solar eclipses, as happened in Gulbarga last week, and a series of “honor killings” for marriage within the same gotra in Haryana. Leaving social reform to time alone is a poor answer.

Top

 

A couple’s dream
by Jupinderjit Singh

Journalist couples, especially those working as reporters, must be sharing a dream, my wife and I always talked about. How it would look like if we saw our bylines on the same day on page one in our paper --- The Tribune?

Two reporters, even if they are husband and wife, posted at one station can have a joint byline on a single story on the front page. But we thought it would be quite embarrassing and childish. And it was almost impossible to get two different stories carried on page one the same day if the place of posting was a city like Ludhiana.

We tried it for many years but the desire remained unfulfilled. It was, however, no problem for us to be together on the front page of The Ludhiana Tribune. Some ardent readers had nicknamed us “JK express”, taking the initials of our names.

The front-page dream of the main paper eluded us for almost eight years. And, finally, when the day of reckoning came, it was no occasion to celebrate. We thought it would have been better had the dream never realised. For, it was the day of a great tragedy that hit Punjab --- the death of singing sensation Ishmeet Singh.

Some readers have a habit of congratulating reporters on a page one story even if it is about a tragedy. I always got irritated when someone called me to congratulate me on a report concerning a tragedy. I remember how one reader, much to my displeasure, congratulated me on the display of my story on the Jodhpur stampede, which consumed 215 lives.

But that day no one called me. The entire region was in a state of shock. The Tribune dated July 30 carried an interesting story by me about power theft. Above my story was Kanchan’s byline. But it was no occasion to express joy. That day no one could be happy. Ishmeet had reportedly died of drowning in the Maldives.

My wife had reported the story, which broke late on the July 29 evening. We had already reached home after finishing our day’s work when she got a call from a source. Within minutes the worst that had happened was confirmed.

Next morning our stories were on page one. We saw the paper with a heavy heart. I remember tears rolling down our eyes.

This was the cruelest stroke of destiny to fulfil our wish. We never shared the dream again. And if ever we get such a chance again, we hope it is related to some happy occurrence. Amen.

Top

 

Education Policy — A Tribune Debate 
Improve teaching in rural schools
by Gurbax Singh Shergill

THE HRD Minister seems to be more concerned about problems of the urban elite than the conditions of rural and backward poor students. The urban elite students study in public schools, paying hefty fees. They attend coaching classes. They are under heavy pressure mainly because of their parents’ high expectations and the system of CAT and PMET for admissions to top institutes.

Rural and low-income group students join government and aided schools where the teaching-learning levels are very low. Even the high I.Q. students are unable to achieve their best. There is automatic promotion up to class 8 and in most cases students do not feel the need for learning and the teachers also take it easy. There is mass copying and the use of unfair means, fully encouraged by teachers to improve their result percentage which is the basis of teacher evaluation.

Most of these rural and poor students become unemployable certificate holders with very low self-esteem, easily vulnerable to drugs on account of frustration i.e. negative stress which is more dangerous than positive stress of the urban elite.

The abolition of the class X examination will further lead to lower standards of teaching-learning in the rural areas.

The rural and poor students will come under greater stress as they are unable to afford costly tuitions. They will not be able to get even normal grades in their final examination.

The basic need, therefore, is not to abolish examinations but take strong and bold initiatives to improve the quality of teaching at the elementary and high school levels so that the academic gap between the urban elite and the rural poor is minimised.

It is worth noting that most of the present generation of retiring engineers, doctors, army and IAS/IPS officers are products of government and aided schools.

In view of the above facts the HRD Ministry should give priority to the improvement of elementary and higher school education. The teachers’ accountability should be based on a continued comprehensive system on the basis of self-improvement coefficient of the students in their class. The result percentage basis of teachers’ evaluation is the main cause of organised copying in the board examinations.

There is a need to allow the rural backward area students to use their mother tongue in science and mathematics by making the use of standard English terms, formulas and equations compulsory. There is a provision for using mother tongue/Hindi for the IAS/IPS examinations. There is no reason why this option is being denied in the CAT and PMET examinations. This option should also be available in the class X and XII examinations. Special English orientation classes can be held in all medical and engineering colleges so that students with low-level English may come up to the normal standards. This facility is available in some regional institutes even now.

The Sarb Siksha Abhiyan envisages free and compulsory education up to class 8, which will become the first cut-off point. The middle standard examination for these students becomes absolutely necessary. Instead of the abolition of these examinations, the need is to improve paper setting to avoid the evil of private tuition.

The idea of one central board for the whole country consisting of multi-cultural and multi-linguistic population is not only impractical but also sounds to be a unicentric move which will cut the very roots of the federal Constitution of India.

Top

 

Continuous evaluation is a better option
by B.S. Ghuman

THE scrapping of class 10 board examination and replacing the U.G.C., the AICTE, etc. by an Independent Regulatory Authority for Higher Education will have far-reaching implications. In both cases the middle path may yield better results. Charles E. Lindblom — an authority on public decision-making argues that in a pluralistic society, an incremental model of decision making based upon ‘baby steps’ or ‘muddling through approach’ is most suitable. The ‘gradualism thesis’ of Lindblom, however, is not a suitable policy prescription for India in the light of its ambitious plan to quickly become a knowledge power. Simultaneously, the nature of federal polity and pluralistic society are the major hurdles for revolutionary reforms. The middle approach, thus, deserves the attention of the policy makers.

Instead of conducting only one examination at the end of the year, the universities have adopted a dual practice of continuous evaluation and the external examination.

The continuous evaluation tests ‘the stages of the product’ (i.e. learning abilities of the students) and the external examination tests quality of ‘the end product’. Both examinations are, thus, complimentary.

The Kothari Commission also acknowledged the importance of continuous evaluation by stating, “There are, however, several important aspects of the student’s growth that cannot be measured by written examinations, and other methods such as observation techniques, oral tests and practical examinations, have to be devised for collecting evidence for the purpose. These methods need to be improved and made reliable instruments for assessing the student’s performance and educational development” (p. 243).

The credibility of the continuous examination is not on a par with that of the external examination and hence the continuous examination needs drastic reforms. First, the continuous examinations should be designed more scientifically aiming to test creativity, critical thinking, communication, cognition, etc.

Secondly, keeping in view the diverse background of students, the internal examination should be made broadbased. The examination may include components like project work, unit tests, snap tests, learning by doing, field work, presentation, home work, essay writing, experience sharing, comprehensive oral examination, attendance and participation in extracurricular activities.

Thirdly, improving upon the elements of objectivity, validity, transparency, introduction of online continuous examination in select papers and setting up of students’ grievances redressal machinery can also help in improving the credibility of the continuous examinations.

The adoption of the semester system in schools can further help in reducing the examination phobia.

In case the HRD Ministry finally resolves to scrap the 10th class examination; prior to implementing this policy across the country, the experiment may be undertaken on a pilot basis.

The schools for pilot project should be selected by adopting a stratified approach i.e. giving due weightages to location (state, urban and rural), type of school (boys, girls, co-educational), ownership (government, private), medium (English, vernacular).

If the learning abilities of students of the experimental group, i.e. the schools covered under the pilot project are significantly better than that of the control group, only then the pilot project be extended to the entire country.

Top

 

Building a knowledge society
by Rup Narayan Das

AT a time when India is at the threshold of great power, the imperatives of a knowledge society are of paramount importance in our nation building.

Without a strong knowledge base and intellectual capital in place, it would be difficult to envisage economic, industrial, entrepreneurial, social and cultural growth.

The knowledge base has to be holistic and multi-dimensional encompassing all aspects of society and the polity. The applied aspects are as important as theoretical and conceptual aspects.

While applied aspects are like hardware, theoretical and conceptual aspects are like software, one reinforcing the other.

To create a knowledge society two things are the need of the hour. The whole course curriculum needs to be made inter-disciplinary, be it humanities, sciences or engineering. The idea is not to erode exclusiveness of the discipline, but to enable a student to pursue a course or syllabi which is not basic to graduate students.

What we need is a cross-fertilisation of ideas, be it in the domain of bureaucracy or academia. Like the inter-disciplinary approach, the universities and research institutes should welcome talent from outside like the civil service, the private sector and civil society.

Similarly, there should be lateral induction in the bureaucracy encouraging aspirants from other backgrounds such as technocrats, professionals and academia in senior positions. In any advanced and developed knowledge society, lateral induction is a normal thing.

Top

 

Grades better than marks
by S. Sapru

THE policy of no detention at the primary school level has over the years come to be interpreted as a policy of no evaluation/examination, especially in rural India. This anomaly has badly affected the teaching-learning processes in our schools and is one of the prime reasons why our goal of the universalisation of elementary education has also not been achieved, even till date.

It is a well-acknowledged fact that the goal of the universalisation of elementary education cannot be accepted to have been achieved unless the achievement is assigned an equal importance along with universal access, enrolment and 100 per cent retention up to 14 years of age. The achievement needs to be tested on the anvil referred to above.

It was rightly pointed out by Sudhamahi Regunathan in the article “CLASS X exams, or No?,” (The Tribune, July 3) that "when you meet a fifth class student in an average government school across the country, it should come as no surprise that they cannot even write their names". If the class 10 examination is done away with, I am afraid our students will not be competitive till the time they reach class 12th and at that stage it will not be possible for them to redo what they were expected to learn from class 1 to 10th. It may, in every likelihood result, in our class X pass youth not being in a position to write their names even.

It is important, therefore, that the class 10th examination should not be scrapped. Examinations will have to stay as a very significant measuring parameter in our education system. However, in order to relieve the stress on the class 10 students the marks system may be replaced by the grades system at the 10th and 12th levels and the students who intend pursuing higher studies be asked to write a common entrance test based on which admissions to institutions of higher learning be granted.

Top

 

When tempers fly: How to avoid air rage
by Simon Calder

CHEAP plane tickets have a nasty habit of becoming expensive. Three years ago I booked a bargain trip from Belfast City to Stansted with Europe's third-largest budget airline, Air Berlin. We passengers all turned up at the airport on time, knowing that even a minute's tardiness is enough to see you offloaded. But a flight that began with an hour's delay was, later in the evening, cancelled. Apparently the plane that was supposed to operate was redeployed to replace a broken aircraft elsewhere on the network.

At that point, I should have in theory have cried "God bless the EU", as the airline showered me with compensation and arranged my hotel room for the night, plus a taxi to take me there. After all, a year earlier, the European Commission had introduced rules on compensation and assistance to airline passengers that were intended to provide "Transport with a human face" – and deal with exactly the circumstances I was in.

But almost all my experiences with "EC261/2004", as the rules are catchily titled, suggest that many airlines are simply ignoring their obligation. Instead of meals and accommodation being arranged, the sole Air Berlin rep handed everyone a piece of paper with some out-of-date telephone numbers for hotels and left us to get on with it.

The Air Transport Users' Council suggests travellers are getting increasingly exasperated by airlines' behaviour; complaints to the body are up by 11 per cent.

But I think we protest too much. Get used to it: air travel lost any glamour years ago. It is now a safe and often cheap commodity that takes from A (where you don't want to be, particularly if it's Stansted), to B, which is somewhere you yearn to be - whether for culture, romance or cheap beer.

It will deliver you to your dream; just don't moan if the process becomes a nightmare. And consult the guidelines here to see if it's worth making a fuss. It usually isn't.

Here are some of the top written complaints to the Air Transport Users' Council this year – and what you can do about them...

Cancellations (45 per cent of total complaints recieved): As the airlines struggle to contain costs, they are axing flights in the manner of serial killers. Six months ago I paid British Airways for the privilege of flying from Barcelona to London in October; the airline believes it is cheaper to keep the plane on the ground and refund my fare than to operate it. And because BA told me more than two weeks ahead, it does not owe me a penny in compensation nor interest. Even if your flight is cancelled with less notice, don't expect the airline to lavish you with cash; obfuscation is more likely.

Delays (17 per cent): One consequence of the recession is that about 10 per cent fewer flights are operating across Europe - and those that do take off are consequently less likely to be held up because of air-traffic control. That could explain the decline in complaints about tardiness. If a plane is late, all you can do is hope that the airline will honour its legal obligation to look after you with refreshment, phone calls and – if a night-stop is necessary – a hotel room.

— By arrangement with The Independent

Top

 

Corrections and clarifications

l In the report “Mankotia hints at political comeback” (Page 9, July 25), the first sentence says “Supporters of former Congress leader Vijay Singh Mankotia has pressed on him to return to active politics”. It should have been “……are putting pressure on him to return to active politics”.

l The headline “Woman alleges cop of ‘using’ her” (Page 4, July 26, Chandigarh Tribune) should have been “Woman blames cop of ‘using’ her”.

l In the first para of the report “HC: Dept action against errant cop not enough” (Page 3, July 27), in place of “DIG”, it should have been “DGP”.

l In Lifestyle (Page 1, July 27), the word “adventurous” has been mis-spelt as “Adventourous” in the second deck of the headline.

Despite our earnest endeavour to keep The Tribune error-free, some errors do creep in at times. We are always eager to correct them.

This column will now appear thrice a week — every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. We request our readers to write or e-mail to us whenever they find any error.

Readers in such cases can write to Mr Kamlendra Kanwar, Senior Associate Editor, The Tribune, Chandigarh, with the word “Corrections” on the envelope. His e-mail ID is kanwar@tribunemail.com.

H.K. Dua,
Editor-in-Chief

Top

 





HOME PAGE | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Opinions |
| Business | Sports | World | Letters | Chandigarh | Ludhiana | Delhi |
| Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |