ART & LITERATURE
'ART & SOUL
ENTERTAINMENT
TELEVISION

GARDEN LIFE

NATURE
FOOD TALK
CONSUMERS, BEWARE!
FASHION
GLOBOSCOPE
BRIDGE
ULTA-PULTA
EARLIER FEATURE
TRAVEL
RELATIONSHIPS
DREAM THEME
TIME OFF

New hub of global art
India is emerging as the new canvas where global art and galleries are creating an exciting new collage of opportunity, mega-bucks and visibility for artists and their works, writes Nonika Singh 
N
ot
too long ago, as art auctions set the market aflutter with prices of Indian art touching sky high the buzz was: Has Indian art arrived on the international market? Today, as works of celebrated signatures like Subodh Gupta, Bharti Kher, Sudarshan Shetty, Jitish Kallat and, of course, masters like Husain, Raza and Souza are being handled by prestigious international galleries, perhaps the answer to the first query is but obvious: "Indeed, yes."

A visitor walks past an art work by Vivek Vilasini at the India Art Fair in New Delhi.
A visitor walks past an art work by Vivek Vilasini at the India Art Fair in New Delhi

Romancing Valentineís Day
Divisha Saran
Nobody has ever measured, even poets, how much a heart can hold. ó Zelda Fitzgerald

R
eams
and reams have been written on the subject of love which has a special significance for all. Some fall in love and others rise in it. Wars have been fought over it; emperors have abdicated their thrones and people beheaded in blind rage of the spurned. All for love.

Woo each other with a makeover
I
tís
that time of the year when women are all set to kill with their looks. And guys, if youíve tried everything to keep your girlfriend happy, from irresistible chocolates and romantic night-outs to flowers, then perhaps itís now time to gift her a "makeover session" this Valentine season. Many of them are queuing up to do it for themselves whereas others are opting to undergo the treatments for their beloved.

On wings of Love
It is the time of the year when love is in the air. And the one day that most signifies this emotion is February 14, the Valentine's Day, when it is celebrated. Would, then, any destination do for a Valentine date? There are some places that are closely associated with this fragile feeling. If you are planning some time out, try these romantic destinations for Valentine's Day, says Neerja Bhatnagar
On the BackwaterS front

NOTHING can replace the magic of spending Valentine's Day in Kerala. The exotic southern experience includes those of boats swaying languidly in the water, sweeping beaches, herbal massages, palaces, gardens and a finger-licking cuisine. Romance can be in full bloom on the backwaters on a luxury wood-and-coir boat that cruises lazily in the gently lapping waters. Backwaters are not natural reclusive islands of glory in an untouched paradise. 

Infectious kiss
A
n
expert has warned lovers to be cautious while kissing on Valentineís Day, as this is "usually the peak season for infectious diseases". Changing weather or temperatures are often blamed for winterís coughs and sniffles. But in reality, colds, coughs and the flu are infectious diseases "caught" through transmission from one human to another.

Love is in the theatres
Close on the heels of flower and greeting card industries, the film fraternity is also keen to cash in on the Valentine fever, observes Deepa Karmalkar

N
ever
mind if the maharaja of mush Karan Johar proclaims that heís "tasted blood" with the super success of Agneepath. Heís definitely not holding back his trump card this Valentineís as he pegs his next release Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu near Valentineís Day. Proof enough of the fact that Valentine fever has caught on and quite on the lines of Diwali and Christmas releases, Valentineís Day is turning out to be a coveted period for film releases.

Fragrance of love
A view of packed bouquets of roses ahead of Valentine's Day, the biggest holiday of the year for fresh-cut flower sales, at a flower farm in Facatativa, near Bogota, Colombia. In giant greenhouses outside Bogota, the flowers are clipped and shipped worldwide, accounting for 65 per cent of the roses imported in the United States and many of the bouquets delivered in Europe. The hours ahead of Valentine's Day are a boom period for Colombian growers, who expedite their exports.

fruit facts

 

COLUMNS

'ART & SOUL: The story of printing
by B. N. Goswamy

consumers beware!: Wake-up call for insurers
by Pushpa Girimaji

Food talk: Treat from Awadh
by Pushpesh Pant

globoscope: Rare treat
by Ervell E. Menezes

TELEVISION: Wild AFFAIR

ULTA PULTAA draping disease
by Jaspal Bhatti

w-horos

BOOKS & ARTS

This writer offers a slice of the world
Patricia Schultz, an American travel writer whose huge global compendium 1,000 Places to See Before You Die sold three million copies is all set to publish a sequel to her work. She talks to Nick Duerden about travelling to the most exotic places alone
In 1995, Patricia Schultz, an American travel writer, began to work on a book that was less travel guide than it was global compendium. Her See. Schultz liked neither the title nor the number. "If you write about the 100 best places in the world, you write about all the usual suspects: London, Paris, Beijing," she says. "But add a zero, and you suddenly throw yourself open to the entire world."The result was 1,000 Places to See Before You Die.

The many facets of HRD
Reviewed by Sanchita Bansal
Economics of Human Resource 
Development in India
by Dr M. M .Goel.
V. K. Global Publications. Pages 244. Rs 300.

Thriller captures Biharís wild, feudal days
B
ihar
is a goldmine of drama. A ruthless thakur, a landowner with vendetta in his blood and an unarmed man with a fortune to his name are chasing a rare diamond, each for different reasons. Bihar has perhaps spun its first homegrown thriller, a Western-style potboiler, by son-of-the soil writer Hemant Kumar.

Dickens will always regale
Even though the Victorian writer lived more than 200 years ago, his work is still relevant as the traits of his much-loved characters are universal, writes Nivedita Ganguli
Charles Dickens
was born nearly 200 years ago, on February 7, 1812. His bicentenary is being celebrated in a big way on screen and stage, in print, street festivals and exhibitions.

Call of the land
Gurvinder Singh, whose debut Punjabi film Anhe Ghore Da Daan, based on Gurdial Singhís novel of the same name, talks of his cinematic journey and connect with Punjab to Aruti Nayar
Meeting
Gurvinder Singh, is a surprise because he is the very antithesis of the usual image of a Punjabi filmmaker. Modest and a trifle diffident, he opens up gradually. This despite the fact that his debut feature film Anhe Ghore Da Daan premiered in "Orizzonti" at the 68th Venice International Film Festival in September last year.

Mona Lisaís Ďtwin sisterí found 500 years later
S
panish
curators claim the Mona Lisa at the Prado in Madrid was executed by an artist in Leonardo da Vinciís workshop at the same time as the original. It is the first known copy of the most famous painting in history, and a discovery that curators at Spainís national art museum believe sheds new light on the creation of the masterpiece, according to The Independent.

short takes
Discussing development and culture

* Target 3 Billion 
by APJ Abdul Kalam & Srijan Pal Singh
Penguin. Pages xix+298. Rs 299
*
Recent Development Debates
Ed. Balwinder Singh Tiwana & V. Upadhyay
Punjabi University. Pages: xi+378. Rs 400
*
The Hidden Glory of India 
by Steven J. Rosen. Jaico. Pages 191. Rs 395







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