At $79 bn, India highest recipient of remittances: WB

WASHINGTON:India retained its position as the world’s top recipient of remittances with its diaspora sending a whopping $79 billion back home in 2018, the World Bank said in a report.

Washington, April 9 

India retained its position as the world’s top recipient of remittances with its diaspora sending a whopping $79 billion back home in 2018, the World Bank said in a report.

With this, India has retained its top spot on remittances, according to the latest edition of the World Bank’s Migration and Development Brief. 

Over the past three years, India has registered a significant flow of remittances from $62.7 billion in 2016 to $65.3 billion in 2017. In Pakistan, remittance growth was moderate (7%), due to significant declines in inflows from Saudi Arabia, its largest remittance source. In Bangladesh, remittances showed a brisk uptick in 2018 (15%). According to the report, remittances to low and middle-income countries reached a record high of $529 billion in 2018, an increase of 9.6% over the previous record high of $483 billion in 2017.

Global remittances, which include flows to high-income nations, reached $689 billion in 2018, up from $633 billion in 2017. The bank said remittances to South Asia grew 12% to $131 billion in 2018, outpacing 6% growth in 2017.

“The upsurge was driven by stronger economic conditions in the US and a pick-up in oil prices, which had a positive impact on outward remittances from some GCC countries,” it said. The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) is a regional inter-governmental political and economic bloc of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and UAE.

However, the bank in its report rued the global average cost of sending $200 remained high, at around 7% in the first quarter of 2019.

Reducing remittance costs to 3% by 2030 is a global target under Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 10.7. Remittance costs across many African corridors and islands in Pacific remain above 10%.

On ways to lower costs, Dilip Ratha, lead author of Brief and head of KNOMAD, said, “Remittances are on track to become largest source of external financing in developing countries. The high costs of money transfers reduce the benefits of migration. Renegotiating exclusive partnerships and letting new players operate through national post offices, banks, and telecommunications companies will increase competition and lower remittance prices.” — PTI

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