Lessons from the Kargil War : The Tribune India

Join Whatsapp Channel

Lessons from the Kargil War



With reference to ‘Recalling the blood spilt on mountaintops’ (Nous Indica); as we approach the 25th anniversary of the Kargil conflict, it is crucial to reflect on the lessons learnt from the episode. The Kargil bloodshed, the Doklam incursion and the Ladakh standoff are stark reminders of the threats on our borders. These events should not be mere footnotes in history but pivotal moments for introspection and fortification. The valour of our soldiers must not be forgotten. However, the intelligence failure that necessitated such sacrifice should be looked into. There is a need to ensure that the bravery of our troops is matched by the vigil on our borders.

Gurpreet Kaur, Mohali


Prevent a repeat

Apropos of ‘Recalling the blood spilt on mountaintops’ (Nous Indica); the Kargil conflict is a saga of patriotism that is still fresh in the minds of Indians. The current standoff with China remains a matter of concern. The last thing we want is a repeat of the Kargil War. It would lead to bloodshed and the loss of lives all over again. China’s incursions into Ladakh and Doklam and the Dragon’s claim over Arunachal Pradesh expose Beijing’s nefarious ploy against India. New Delhi’s emphatic response to China’s baseless claims has shown that India will not succumb to such heavy-handed tactics.

Ravinder Singh, Jalandhar


Protecting India’s global image

With reference to the editorial ‘Tough stand on terror’; India needs to be wary of the Western powers that do not support New Delhi’s rise as a major power on the world stage. Of course, Western countries use India to counter the Chinese influence in the region. But when it comes to Indian efforts to nip the evil of terrorism in the bud, those powerful countries do nothing. West Asia is already going through a volatile phase. With hostilities between Iran and Israel reaching a flashpoint, the situation is a time bomb waiting to explode at any moment. India would do well to dispel the claims that R&AW carried out killings on Pakistani soil. In view of the recent diplomatic tensions between India and some Western powers, New Delhi cannot afford to take any step that will prompt the Western media to paint it as a country that does not respect other nations’ sovereignty.

Deepak Taak, Panchkula


Promise of a better future

Apropos of the editorial ‘Congress manifesto’; the Congress’ pledge to initiate affirmative action is a beacon of hope for India’s marginalised communities. For decades, these groups have been sidelined and their potential stifled by the archaic chains of caste. The proposed lifting of the reservation cap is not just a political promise. It is a clarion call for equality and justice. As the nation goes to the polls, the Congress’ commitment to the promises highlighted in its manifesto must become the cornerstone of governance, if it is voted to power. It’s time to dismantle the barriers of caste and craft a future where the circumstances of one’s birth do not decide one’s destiny.

Sargunpreet Kaur, Mohali


Don’t tinker with history

Refer to the news report ‘NCERT books drop references to Babri demolition, Gujarat riots’; the quick pace at which abrupt changes are being made to the curricula is not academically desirable. Introducing one drastic change after another in the syllabi does not bode well for the education system. In the field of science and technology, a periodic revision of the syllabi is necessary to keep pace with new inventions and discoveries. But there should be no unnecessary alterations in the books of literature or the social sciences. The NCERT must not play with history.

VK Anand, Chandigarh


NCERT book revisions welcome

With reference to ‘NCERT books drop references to Babri demolition, Gujarat riots’; the latest revisions made by the NCERT in the textbooks have sparked a debate about the portrayal of historical events and political narratives in educational material. Are these alterations an effort to reflect contemporary realities and correct factual errors in textbooks or just a needless syllabus revision? Some references to the Babri Masjid demolition have been dropped. The language is being changed to align with the latest developments in politics. There is a need to acknowledge the complexity of such events, ensuring that the communities affected are represented accurately. Overall, efforts to update textbooks reflect a commitment to providing students with accurate, relevant and inclusive learning material.

Shruti Saggar, Ludhiana


Letters to the Editor, typed in double space, should not exceed the 200-word limit.

These should be cogently written and can be sent by e-mail to: [email protected]

#Kargil #Ladakh


Top News

Kolkata Knight Riders crush Sunrisers Hyderabad by 8 wickets to clinch 3rd IPL title

'Super Kings': Kolkata Knight Riders crush Sunrisers Hyderabad by 8 wickets to clinch 3rd IPL title

KKR produce a clinical effort with the ball to dismiss SRH f...

Severe cyclone ‘Remal’ barrels towards Bengal coast; over 1 lakh shifted to shelters

Severe cyclone ‘Remal’ barrels towards Bengal coast; over 1 lakh shifted to shelters

Wes Bengal’s coastal areas on high alert; cyclone, accompani...

Army Chief General Manoj Pande gets one-month extension

Army Chief General Manoj Pande gets one-month extension

Appointments Committee of Cabinet approves extension; Gen Pa...

Collegium system ‘undemocratic’, BJP-led NDA will try to scrap it: Former Union Minister Upendra Kushwaha

Collegium system ‘undemocratic’, BJP-led NDA will try to scrap it: Former Union Minister Upendra Kushwaha

Former Union Minister was addressing an election rally in Ka...


Cities

View All