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Dudiya: In Your Burning Land

Dudiya: In Your  Burning Land

Dudiya: In Your Burning Land by Vishwas Patil. Translated by Nadeem Khan. Niyogi Books. Pages 220. Rs 395



Book Title: Dudiya: In Your Burning Land

Author: Vishwas Patil

Dudiya is a spirited young Adivasi girl whose destiny is trapped between the two blades of a pair of scissors — the administration on the one hand, and the Naxals on the other. She joined the Naxals as a young girl and trained with them in the remote and inaccessible Abujmarh mountains. However, as she ended up feeling disillusioned and trapped, she surrendered before the police. She is now branded as a traitor with the Naxals gunning for her life. Her story is narrated by civil servant Dilip Pawar, who is posted in the Naxal-affected districts of Chhattisgarh. What transpires during the 76 days that his duty goes on in the area, changes his outlook on life forever. The novel has been written by Sahitya Akademi novelist Vishwas Patil.


Dance, Nani, Dance: Stories of Grandmothers and Grandfathers Edited by Bulbul Sharma. Speaking Tiger. Pages 248. Rs 399

Paati, Thatha, Dida, Nani, Dadi, Dadu — call them by any name and they’ll remain special. A collection of stories by some of India’s best writers brings to life the unique and beautiful bond children share with grandparents. It will make readers laugh, wipe a tear, or inspire them to cuddle the grandparent some more. There are stories on loss, fun, mysteries, ghosts... Writers in the compendium include Jerry Pinto, Menaka Raman, Deepa Agarwal, Nandita da Cunha, Nandini Nayar and Sayantan Ghosh. Ruskin Bond gives a glimpse of his granny as a young girl. Bulbul Sharma recounts an exciting and unusual train journey with her Dida. Bijal Vachharajani’s grandma would know just what to do with all those single-use plastic bags everywhere.


Who Cares About Parliament: Speaking up to Protect India’s Great Institution by Derek O’Brien. Rupa. Pages 192. Rs 395

Derek O’Brien’s new book is a collection of essays on various themes that have engaged him in his political career, as also in his attempts to contribute to the shaping of public debate and policy-making as a parliamentarian. It deals with contemporary subjects of political and policy interest. Through 25 essays divided into five categories, the author attempts to look at India, with Parliament at the centre of discussion. The first section includes his observations and learnings from the 12 years spent in Parliament. The second consists chapters on passing of the controversial farm Bills. There is a section on the sorry state of relations between the Centre and the states; another one holds a mirror to the ruling party.