Research

External factors may help kids develop internal control

External factors may help kids develop internal control

Image Istock

Washington, April 5

The ability to control your own behaviour, known as executive function, develops with many influences from outside the mind, suggests a new theory.

The theory, detailed in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science, draws on dynamic systems theory which originated in mathematics and physics and has been used to describe complex organising phenomena like cloud formation and flying patterns of birds.

The executive function has been shown to play a role in everything from children's readiness for school to their social relationships.

Its development is also tied to long-term outcomes for adulthood.

"We propose that executive function is really about using cues from the environment to guide your behaviour," said Sammy Perone, Assistant Professor at the Washington State University.

"As humans we use our experience and norms to decide what's the appropriate path to take, so to encourage executive function development, we want to help children build those connections between cues and appropriate behaviours." In a classroom, these cues might include things such as decorations on the wall, verbal instructions or the way tables are set up.

Eliminating environmental distractions may also help children control their behaviour like having sharpened pencils on hand or resolving a tottering desk chair.

In addition, physical things normally thought of as peripheral, like whether a child has adequate sleep or enough to eat, also influence executive function, Perone said.

Previously, the dominant view held that executive function was three distinct neurocognitive processes: working memory, inhibitory control, which is the ability to stop yourself from doing something, and cognitive flexibility, which allows you to transition from one activity to the next.

This perspective has been called into question, Perone said.

"If these different cognitive processes are what makes up executive function, you would think you could just train those processes, and then, you can then use them everywhere," he said.

"Turns out, that doesn't work, and that's been shown over and over again. People think and behave in an environment, so we can't just train executive function by say doing computer exercises on working memory." The new theory builds on the work of cognitive scientist Sabine Doebel who called for a redefinition of executive function in 2020 as the "development of skills in using control in the service of behaviour". IANS

Top Stories

India to open up COVID vaccination for all adults over 18 from May 1

India to open up COVID vaccination for all adults over 18 from May 1

Vaccine makers will need to reserve 50% doses for Centre and...

No evidence of the young being at greater risk in ongoing COVID wave: ICMR

No evidence of the young being at greater risk in ongoing COVID wave: ICMR

Over 70 per cent of patients above 40 years in both waves; n...

Punjab imposes stricter curbs as COVID-19 cases rise; bars, cinema halls, gyms, spas to be closed

Punjab imposes stricter curbs as COVID-19 cases rise; bars, cinema halls, gyms, spas to be closed

Ban on gatherings of over 20, including at weddings and fune...

Former PM Manmohan Singh tests positive for COVID-19; admitted to AIIMS

Former PM Manmohan Singh tests positive for COVID-19; admitted to AIIMS

88-year-old Singh and his wife had taken their second shots ...

Delhi announces 6-day lockdown starting  Monday night

Delhi announces 6-day lockdown starting Monday night

We cannot have people dying on the roads: Chief Minister Kej...

Cities

View All