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Posted at: Apr 25, 2018, 2:57 PM; last updated: Apr 25, 2018, 2:57 PM (IST)

Cyberbullying may double risk of self-harm, suicidal behaviour

Cyberbullying may double risk of self-harm, suicidal behaviour
Photo for representational purpose only.

LONDON: Children and youngsters who face cyberbullying are more than twice as likely to self-harm and enact suicidal behaviour, a new study has found.

The research also suggests that it is not just the victims of cyberbullying that are more vulnerable to suicidal behaviours, but the perpetrators themselves are at higher risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviours as well.

Cyberbullying is using electronic communication to bully another, for instance by sending intimidating, threatening or unpleasant messages using social media.

Researchers from Swansea University, University of Oxford and University of Birmingham in the UK looked at over 150,000 children and young people across 30 countries, over a 21-year period.

The findings, published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, highlighted the significant impact that cyberbullying involvement (as bullies and victims) can have on children and young people.

The researchers say it shows an urgent need for effective prevention and intervention in bullying strategies.

“Prevention of cyberbullying should be included in school anti-bullying policies, alongside broader concepts such as digital citizenship, online peer support for victims, how an electronic bystander might appropriately intervene; and more specific interventions such as how to contact mobile phone companies and internet service providers to block, educate, or identify users,” said John.

“Suicide prevention and intervention is essential within any comprehensive anti-bullying programme and should incorporate a whole-school approach to include awareness raising and training for staff and pupils,” she said.

The research also found that students who were cyber-victimised were less likely to report and seek help than those victimised by more traditional means, thus highlighting the importance for staff in schools to encourage ‘help-seeking’ in relation to cyberbullying. PTI

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