Sunday, November 18, 2018
facebook

google plus
Uttarakhand » Community

Posted at: Nov 25, 2015, 1:10 AM; last updated: Nov 25, 2015, 1:05 AM (IST)

Madhesi stir hits marriages between Indians, Nepalese

Traditional relations hampered

  • The marriage relations between the people living in the border areas of both countries have been a tradition for a long time
  • A large number of Nepalese had migrated to India and settled in the region during the rule of the Chand kings of Champawat
  • No marriage party has crossed over to Nepal nor has come from the neighbouring country to India this year
  • Following the Madhesi agitation in Nepal, most of the people are reluctant to marry their children across the border as they suspect the two countries will have estranged relations for some time

BD Kasniyal

Pithoragarh, November 24

No marriage party has crossed over to India from Nepal or from India to the neighbouring country though seven days of the Hindu marriage month of Mangsir have passed. This is believed to be the fallout of the agitation by the Madhesi community in the Terai belt of Nepal for the last some months. Residents of border towns of Tanakpur and Banbasa in India and Mahendranagar of Nepal traditionally marry their children into the families residing in the other country.

The marriage relations between the people living in the border areas of both countries have been a tradition for a long time as a large number of Nepalese had migrated to India and settled in the region during the rule of the Chand kings of Champawat. “Even today, most of the people settled in border villages of Pithoragarh and Champawat districts relate their origin to Nepal and maintain matrimonial relations with people living in the neighbouring country,” said Navin Deopa, a resident of Banbasa town of Champawat district.

According to sources, no marriage party has crossed over to Nepal nor has come from the neighbouring country to India this year, while more than 12 marriages had taken place between the people of the two countries till November last year. “Following the Madhesi agitation in Nepal, most of the people are reluctant to marry their children across the border as they suspect the two countries will have estranged relations for some time. India has already imposed restrictions on the free movement of people to Nepal,” says Ghanshyam Dutt Joshi, a priest residing at Banbasa town of Champawat district.

Joshi says during the marriage season several marriages take place between the people of Kanchanpur district of Nepal and Indian towns of Champawat, Banbasa and Khatima. “If the situation continues, the traditional matrimonial relations between the communities of the two countries, especially those residing in the border areas, will suffer as well as the goodwill among the people,” he adds.

COMMENTS

All readers are invited to post comments responsibly. Any messages with foul language or inciting hatred will be deleted. Comments with all capital letters will also be deleted. Readers are encouraged to flag the comments they feel are inappropriate.
The views expressed in the Comments section are of the individuals writing the post. The Tribune does not endorse or support the views in these posts in any manner.
Share On