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Sunday, June 24, 2001
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Plundered possessions

IN his article, "Plundered possessions" (June 3), Surinder Malhi has described the history of a number of ancient Indian artefacts that are currently in foreign possession. Quite often one hears of slogan-shouting zealots demanding their return.

However, looking closely at the mismanaged museums of our country, where, "for the most part, apathy reigns", (a quote from B.N. Goswamyís accompanying article), one wishes that they should remain wherever they are.

Going by the writerís convincing conclusion that "history cannot be undone by reclaiming objects and nationhood is not threatened by their absence", this becomes more rational. And his assertion that today these objects are celebrations not of the military supremacy of their keepers but of our own artistic achievement is also worth pondering over and appreciating.

BALVINDER, Chandigarh.

Being an examiner

This refers to the article "Thrill of being an examiner" by D.C. Sharma (June 10).

I have in my possession a letter written to my father, then working in Madurai. It was obviously written by a professional letter writer. And was written in order to get a job at the place where my father was a manager.

The letter concluded thus.

"I pray to the Lord Jesus Christ, who your Lordship so greatly resembles....."

I donít know if he succeeded in getting the job!

JOHN FELTHAM, Via e-mail.

 


Deceptive appearances

This refer to Taru Bahlís thought-provoking write-up "Appearance can be deceptive" (June 10). Appearances are not only deceptive but can often be erroneous as well. The writer raises a pertinent question in the context of human nature ó can a man with a vile past lead an honourable life?

Man can be redeemed. Deep and sincere affection has the power to redeem a man of even the roughest nature. The emotional outburst of Suresh before Rehana confirms this.

In the present times, appearance has become to deceptive that in most cases we find that people are much more naive and simple than we assume them to be.

P. L. SETHI, Patiala.

Forging a national metaphor

This refers to the article: "Forging a national metaphor" by Surinder Malhi (June 10). More and more Bollywood actors and actresses are making a mark in southern cinema. Stars like Arvind Swamy, Prabhu Deva and Nagarjuna have become familiar faces from Kashmir to Kanyakumari. However, coming together to Bollywood and South Indian film industry is not enough to conclude that Indian cinema is attaining the status of national cinema. This can only happen if the level of interaction between Bollywood and other regional film industries also increases.

ONKAR CHOPRA, Ludhiana

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