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Sunday, July 8, 2001
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Attitudes towards the aged

Apropos of J.S. Bediís article "Attitude towards the aged is changing" (June 17), the points raised by the writer need further analysis, as the problems of the aged are the result of modernisation and urbanisation. Joint families have given way to nuclear families, which in turn, have made way for single parent families. The migration of children to other places for the sake of earning a livelihood, aggravates the problems of the aged.

The conflict of interests between husband, wife and parents often causes tensions. The children should, therefore, be more considerate towards their aged parents, as it is their duty and responsibility to make their parentsí remaining days truly happy and satisfying. Parents should also adjust to the changed times.

Both parents and children need each other for support and security. A family without elders would lack depth and colour. We should learn to cherish old people for their experience, values and qualities.

O.P. SHARMA, Faridabad

 

II

Many senior citizens live a life of neglect and loneliness. There was a time when grown up children provided physical, emotional and monetary support to their parents but now things have changed. According to a UN report, 70 million people in India are more than 60 years old. Of these, 40 per cent live below the poverty line. Elderly people who have adequate resources often live lonely lives. Their children send them money but canít offer company. The government and voluntary organisations should provide infrastructure needed to make the lives of aged people more comfortable.

VINISH GARG, Panchkula

 

Mental myopia

Apropos of I.M. Soniís thought-provoking write-up "Generalisations a form of mental myopia" (June 24). The writer argues that generalisations lead to intellectual myopia. I disagree with this view. It is a human tendency to pass judgement on others irrespective of whether one knows the person or not. Judgement in social life is determined more by feeling than by intellect. How then can it be termed as a form of mental myopia?

Admittedly, people derive generalisations from a single experience. But it is practically impossible to change oneís outlook, which is based on oneís experiences in oneís early life, in oneís later years.

The writer aptly argues that generally people categorise others in black and white and in the shades of grey with which nature made the world. There is no virtue which has not some shade of vice and hardly any vice, which does not carry with it a dash of virtue.

P.L. SETHI, Patiala

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