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Sunday
, June 9, 2002

Bridge

When west tried one of his partnerís tricks
By Omar Sharif

HOLDING up an Ace when you are defending is fairly routine ó often it can seriously interfere with declarerís communications.

Holding up with King and another can work in the same way, but it is more dangerous.

In a recent rubber East tried it out ó he held K2, dummy AQJ1098, West 7654 and declarer 3.

With the lead in hand declarer led the three and finessed the Queen. East held off smoothly. He hoped that declarer might have to use up another entry to hand to repeat the (now) unsuccessful finesse.

Unlucky! With no more cards in the suit, declarer could not finesse again and the play of dummyís Ace brought unexpected dividends.

This was the very next deal.

South was the dealer at game all and his partnership bid to Six Spades (Six Hearts would have been more comfortable).

West led the Ace of Diamonds and declarer ruffed on the table. It seemed obvious to run the ten of Spades.

If it lost, he argued to himself, declarer would still be in complete control and would have more winners than he needed.

This was equally clear to West, however, and, in spite of his partnerís little setback on the previous deal, he ducked the Spade.

"I hope that you are not trying one of your partnerís tricks!" chuckled South as he confidently repeated the Spade finesse, catering for East holding four trumps.

"I am afraid that I am," replied West, producing the Queen of Spades and the King of Diamonds in quick succession.

To give South his due, he good humouredly joined in the general amusement.

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