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Sunday
, January 13, 2002

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War against India

"WAR against India" by Rajeev Sharma (December 23) was a through-provoking write-up. It is now clear that Pakistan and the ISI is wholly responsible for the acts of terrorism in various parts of our country. It is time we launched a full-fledged war against Pakistan to teach it a lesson for the activities that it has been carrying out. To put up with injustices is as big a sin as it is to perpetuate injustice. We have tolerated terrorism for very long. Now the time is ripe to tell the world that if we are strong enough to tolerate misadventure on the part of other countries, we are also strong enough to face them.

H.S. Dimple, Jagraon

II

"War against India" by Rajiv Sharma was timely and exhaustive. After the creation of Pakistan military juntas have ruled there. The annexation of Jammu & Kashmir was the very first misadventure by Pakistan which sowed the seeds of enmity between the two nations. Besides, the wars with India in 1965 and 1971, the Pak rulers also created the ISI to destablise India. Various madrassas (training schools) were opened to train local and foreign youths to carry out the nefarious designs of Pakistan. In the name of jehad, foreign money was collected to purchase arms and ammunition to kill innocent people and create terror. It should now be dismantled.

Karnail Singh, Ranjit Sagar Dam.

 

III

Apropos of "Terrorism: The concern spreads unhindered" (December 23) by Amar Nath Wadehra & Randeep Wadehra, the series of recent terrorist activities suggest that terrorism has entered a new phase and almost the entire world is under its threat.

Most leading anti-terrorism experts are of the view that religion has become the main factor motivating terrorism. Though efforts by police and intelligence could help in providing sufficient information about a possible terrorist attack, it is doubtful that such a mechanism could be successful in dealing with terrorists driven by fundamentalism.

K. M. Vashisht, Mansa.

Healing therapies

Geetanjali Sharmaís article "Seeking healing" (December 16) was excellent. Its tone was soothing and it avoided technical jargon, but at the same time it was informative.

Depression, irritability, melancholia, anger, hypochondria, anxiety are the result of stress generated by the modern lifestyle. Allopathy hardly has any effective cure for these diseases. Hence, the need and justification for alternate healing therapies.

In fact, now even the pratitioners of allopathy have started acknowledging the merits of alternate healing therapies like yoga. Yoga is popular the world over and it is both preventive as well as curative. But it is unfortunate that an adequate number of qualified and competent yoga teachers are not available in India. It appears that the centre and state governments are paying only lip sympathy to this ancient science. A qualitative change for the better in the nationís health can be brought about by propagating yoga.

Beant Singh Bedi, Chandigarh.

Psychological craving

In the article "When the craving is psychological", Taru Bahl has rightly said that gluttony of the mind manifests itself in extremes.

Therefore we had better not be gluttonous for it is no less a psychological disease than gluttony of the stomach. Gluttony of the mind leads to insecurity, jealousy and acquisitiveness.

Hans Raj jain, Moga

Teen troubles

Apropos of Mohinder Singhís article "Tackling teen troubles" (December 16),when children enter teenage, parents normally notice a change in their behaviour but donít really know how to handle them. Demanding explanations does not help, instead it may further push them on the back foot. Parents canít ask children to compromise either on TV, sports or Internet. So the motivation should come from within. The strategy should be to help them develop into good human beings rather than emphasis only on studies. We should respect their emotions, give them quality time and lead by example.

Vinish Garg, Panchkula

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